haunting works

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mileschris

haunting works

Post by mileschris » Mon Aug 15, 2005 3:43 pm

greetings...as i get older (and become less and less stimulated by modern music) i appreciate classical music more and more. i've spent
countless hours here educating myself and enjoy reading your comments. this site is what makes the internet such a valuable tool.

anyway, i'm looking for haunting, eerie choral works. i came across the album Into the Light recorded by the Christ Church Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys of Indianapolis, Indiana. i purchased this disc several years ago. i am finally beginning to appreciate the amazing sounds
captured on this recording, particularly Monteverdi's "Ave Maris Stella."
i searched "haunting" on this site and came away with Shostakovich's Symph No 15. i plan on picking this up but was wondering if any of you have other suggestions. the works don't have to
be exclusively choral (sorry if i'm abusing classical terminology, still learning). i love eerie, creepy, haunting, etc music so any suggestions would be appreciated. thanks...

mc

12tone
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Post by 12tone » Mon Aug 15, 2005 3:54 pm

I'm one of the biggest fans of a cd called Morimur and I can't recommend that cd enough!

It's on the label 'ECM New Series' and it has both choral work and the Partita in D minor (BWV 1004) for solo violin by JS Bach. The choral works are very short but sweet and also have a hint of 'eerieness' about them.

It's more of a concept cd in that it's based on findings of a researcher that found out some new information on the Ciaccona that Bach wrote...I'll leave you to read the story :)

I'd recommend it to you 100% Great singing and great violin playing!

Performed by:

The Hilliard Ensembled

Christoph Poppen - violin

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Aug 15, 2005 4:03 pm

Perhaps Ligeti's Lux Aeterna. I find much of the medieval and gothic vocal tradition can be quite haunting - try Anonymous 4's A Mass for the End of Time. Many Requiem masses may also fit the bill - although Verdi's is more terrifying than haunting.

For pure 'Dracula' stuff I like Bach's organ music.

mileschris

Post by mileschris » Mon Aug 15, 2005 4:23 pm

any specific bach works, Brendan?

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:35 pm

Actually, nothing specific. When the mood hits I tend to reach for the Walcha complete box set and grab a disc at random.

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Post by fourseasons » Mon Aug 15, 2005 8:47 pm

Try Gorecki's Symphony #3 ( Symphony of Sorrowful Songs)

It's definitely worth the listen in my opinion.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Mon Aug 15, 2005 9:08 pm

fourseasons wrote:Try Gorecki's Symphony #3 ( Symphony of Sorrowful Songs)

It's definitely worth the listen in my opinion.
Yes. Excellent choice. Rachamaninoff's symphonies and his The Isle of the Dead fit the category, too.

And this isn't strictly classical, as it's avant-garde ad also combines some metal and rock elements, but it does include much classical instrumention... (primarily that)

check out Devil Doll -- The Girl Who Was Death...and The Sacrilege of Fatal Arms. Dies Irae is also good. Just prepare for some very haunting and creepy music if you can actually find it. And one scary vocalist...

mileschris

Post by mileschris » Mon Aug 15, 2005 11:13 pm

H Sorrow - any particular Rachamaninoff symphs?

THANKS FOR ALL OF THE REPLIES....I'M COMPILING A LIST OF THE WORKS RECOMMENDED....VERY EAGER TO CHECK THEM OUT....

KEEP THEM COMING......THANKS AGAIN!

btw....can anyone recommend haunting choral music albums, collections?

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Post by Lance » Tue Aug 16, 2005 1:18 am

I would highly recommend to you two pieces by Felix Mendelssohn:

[1] Die erste Walpurgischant (The First Walpurgisnacht) for Orchestra & Chorus, Op. 60, composed in 1846. There are a number of fine recordings.

[2] Elijah (Elias) for Chorus & Orchestra, Op. 70, composed in 1846. Again, many fine CDs available of this work.

[3] Symphony No. 2 in B-flat for Two Sopranos, Tenor, Orchestra & Chorus, Op. 92, subtitled "Lobgesand," composed in 1840.

You have some superb listening in store for yourself! Let us know how you like any or all of these works.
Lance G. Hill
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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:45 am

12tone wrote:I'm one of the biggest fans of a cd called Morimur and I can't recommend that cd enough!

It's on the label 'ECM New Series' and it has both choral work and the Partita in D minor (BWV 1004) for solo violin by JS Bach. The choral works are very short but sweet and also have a hint of 'eerieness' about them.

It's more of a concept cd in that it's based on findings of a researcher that found out some new information on the Ciaccona that Bach wrote...I'll leave you to read the story :)

I'd recommend it to you 100% Great singing and great violin playing!

Performed by:

The Hilliard Ensembled

Christoph Poppen - violin
Have we raked over these coals before? I know that this came up on either this or the other board, and I can't remember if you were one of the correspondents. I certainly don't want to start a flame war on the topic, but I think our readers need to have underscored what you yourself point out, that this is a "concept" cd. If anyone can get good vibes from it, I won't naysay them, but let it not be thought for a minute that there is any serious Bach scholarship involved in this at best fanciful "decoding" of the Chaconne.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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where does one start?

Post by PJME » Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:33 am

As a teenager I started discovering music by renting LP's at the local library and I slowly learned to broaden my horizon... From Rumanian folkmusic and Corsican chants to massive choral/orchestral symphonies of the 19th century and quasi tonal/neo romantic minimal/repetitive works of the late 20th century....
If you have time (or make time) to listen, why not try Monteverdi complete? The Vespro della beata vergine (especially when heard live!) is worth investigating.
If you feel comfortable with vocal music the Barock era has much to offer. From the simplest cantata for one voice ( the Bach family, pre-bach composers like Schutz, Schein, Rosenmuller...) to grandiose passions, Motets etc. (the Bach family, again, Lully, Charpentier, Dumont etc in France...).
In the 19th and 20th century a lot of music is "descriptif",eerie,haunting..;even if personal taste may make for different interpretations.
Claude Debussy's "3 nocturnes" ends with "Sirènes" (orchestra and vocalising chorus of 16 female voices)
Maurice Ravel's epic ballet "Daphnis et Chloé" ( complete version, with chorus) is another wonderful evocation of a fantasy world.
Less well known are Karol Szymanowski's third symphony (Song of the night) and his ballet "Harnasie".But both works are full of choral/orchestral drama, refined orchestration and emotive power....
Darius Milhaud wrote in 1918 a spectacular ballet "L'homme et son désir" for vocal quartet and several instrumental groups (with lots of percussion). In its ca 20 mins. ,it brings the Brazilian jungle to life with both force and mystery.there's a recent version on Naxos (Lille Symph.orchestra & soli /Jean Claude Casadesus).
Chostakovitch : I highly recommend his filmscore for "Hamlet" and the cantata "The execution of Stepan Razin". The cantata is very violent and dark . It builds to a towering climax replete with bells and thundering timpani.
Just for sheer "quality" of the music ( these composers where definitely "inspired" writing following scores....!):
Frank Martin : Requiem and "La vie l'emporta"(both works soli,chorus & orchestra)The Requiem is on a grand scale,the cantata is a "chamber" work.
Heitor Villa Lobos : Choros nr 10 chorus & orchestra (a real "incantation")
Florent Schmitt: La tragédie de Salomé (go for the full orchestral/choral version - not the chamber version on Naxos).Good old fashioned high drama /histrionics....think of a silent film with Theda Bara or Gloria Swanson .....Antonio de Almeida and the Tsjech Philharmonic are superb.
Something lighter? THe complete score to Gabriel Pierné's 'Cydalise et le chevre pied' (on Timpani) . elegant, mysterious,mock-Baroque,tunes you can whistle.
On a more quasi-religious level:
André Jolivet : Suite liturgique for girls chorus,cello,harp,oboe
Maurice Ohana : Cantigas (soprano,chorus,large ensemble)
(both works availble in 4 cd box on Warner)
On ECM : Jan Garbarek (sax) and the Hiliard Ensemble : Mnemosyne and Officium ("jazz improvisations combined with renaissance choral works)

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Post by Peter Schenkman » Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:06 am

For “Haunting Works” you really can’t top the Four Last Songs of Strauss which do it for most people most of the time and there is no finer recording then Elisabeth Schwarzkopf’s first recording (September 25, 1953) with Otto Ackermann leading the peerless Philharmonia Orchestra, Manoug Parikian playing the all important violin solo in “Beim Schlafengehen”. The Strauss songs were brilliantly utilized in the Mel Gibson film “The Year of Living Dangerously”, just when you thought that you couldn’t take the tension any longer Strauss entered and really pulled things back, nice touch and very effective use of a classic score in a movie. The film, by the way, is well worth viewing. The first movement of Bachianas Brasileiras no. 5 by Villa-Lobos as well as the Barber Adagio, very effectively used in the movie “Platoon” also easily qualifies, as does the opening of Bloch’s “Schelomo”. To go back much further the opening Kyrie of the Mass in B minor by Bach fills the bill quite nicely.

Peter Schenkman
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Post by BuKiNisT » Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:16 am

When the word 'haunting' comes up I can't help but think Mahler.

Das Lied von der Erde
are really haunting. In the distinctly Mahler way.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:22 am

mileschris wrote:H Sorrow - any particular Rachamaninoff symphs?

THANKS FOR ALL OF THE REPLIES....I'M COMPILING A LIST OF THE WORKS RECOMMENDED....VERY EAGER TO CHECK THEM OUT....

KEEP THEM COMING......THANKS AGAIN!

btw....can anyone recommend haunting choral music albums, collections?
Both of them that I've heard...no. 2 and 3 fit the bill. And I'd also like to point out that Devil Doll includes choirs for effect at times.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:27 am

BuKiNisT wrote:When the word 'haunting' comes up I can't help but think Mahler.

Das Lied von der Erde
are really haunting. In the distinctly Mahler way.
D'OH! I can't believe I forgot about that!

Good suggestion.

And the Ferrier/Walter version, while not the best recording, has three more songs tacked onto the end....they're all at least somewhat haunting, too. :) And it's relatively cheap!

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Post by pizza » Tue Aug 16, 2005 1:50 pm

Try Silvestre Revueltas' La Noche de los Mayas.

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:46 pm

In some ways I think of the Kindertotenlieder as more haunting than Das Lied, which for some reason I associate with the drunk. But I should have thought of Mahler.

I'm not sure if something like Callas permorming Medea (the Bernstein live rec) qualifies as haunting. Certainly the stuff nightmares are made of. But for me the most haunting tune of them all is a Romanian folk tune used in the film Picnic at Hanging Rock to great effect.

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Re: haunting works

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:01 pm

mileschris wrote:greetings...as i get older (and become less and less stimulated by modern music) i appreciate classical music more and more. i've spent countless hours here educating myself and enjoy reading your comments. this site is what makes the internet such a valuable tool.
Thank you, Miles. Lance and I and our regulars who work hard at their avocation appreciate your sentiments.
anyway, i'm looking for haunting, eerie choral works. i came across the album Into the Light recorded by the Christ Church Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys of Indianapolis, Indiana. i purchased this disc several years ago.
Maybe I should ask how you define "haunting." When I say haunting, I mean poignant, romantically sad, affecting, or wistful, and persistently memorable. With that as the premise, here's my offerings:

Magnum Mysterium in an english version by the Men of the Cathedral Choral Society Washington DC.

The Te Deum at the end of The Play of Daniel on most any recording, but if you can turn a copy of the old New York Pro Musica doing it (on MCA), that would be great. When they performed it, at the conclusion of the play, the lights would go out in the Washington National Cathedral, and the players would leave the stage one by one with their candles and their handbells with muffled clappers. They would recess down the aisles of the Cathedral into the dark silence, the sound of the Te Deum dying as they disappeared. It still gets me after 40 years.

Do not stop. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. Go at once an obtain a copy of the Faure Requiem conducted by John Rutter. The whole disc is haunting, including the Cantique de Jean Racine. If you aren't blown off your feet by the In Paradisum, I'll be astonished.

There's a cd of choral music called Agnus Dei. It's got a lot of things on it that fit my description of haunting. They wouldn't make your skin crawl in a spooky movie, but they are memorable.

i am finally beginning to appreciate the amazing soundscaptured on this recording, particularly Monteverdi's "Ave Maris Stella."
Well, don't stop there. Go for the entire Vespers, esp. the Duo Seraphim, and his Sacred Concertos (for chorus).

Are you restricted to choral?
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

mileschris

Post by mileschris » Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:27 pm

thanks for the response, Corlyss_D. as i stated before, this is a fantastic forum filled with interesting comments and questions...keep up the good work!

"haunting" defined
when i think of haunting music Barber's Adagio For Strings (the first time i heard this song was in david lynch's "the elephant man"....my favorite movie i am moved everytime i see, and hear, it) quickly comes to mind. your definition ("poignant, romantically sad, affecting, or wistful, and persistently memorable") would be a very accurate one.

"Are you restricted to choral?"
in short, no; but i do prefer choral music. it is hard for me to describe the feelings i get when i hear a choir singing a piece of music written hundreds, thousands of years ago. i think of it as pure music....heavenly...words are hard to find.
"music" and "restrictions" are contradictions in my opinion (they also rhyme :D ) so i welcome any "haunting" recommendations.

I AM OVERWHELMED BY THE RESPONSE TO THIS POST....THANKS TO ALL OF YOU...I WILL BE SURE TO PROVIDE FEEDBACK....THANKS AGAIN :D

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:02 pm

Due to Devil Doll albums being in rather...limited circulation, I decided to put two up here for download (in ZIP format). Here's the link to the first one:

http://s39.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=32YL ... F8HPSLIXQD

It may take a while...but it's worth it. And beware...it's about a 40 minute piece, but it has a long period of silence at the end.

EDIT: And the second work:

http://s39.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=3C9L ... NY13ICTS1M

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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Aug 17, 2005 1:59 am

mileschris wrote:when i think of haunting music Barber's Adagio For Strings (the first time i heard this song was in david lynch's "the elephant man"....my favorite movie i am moved everytime i see, and hear, it) quickly comes to mind.
Ah, then you will love the Agnus Dei disc - the lead off track is the Barber adagio arranged for chorus as an Agnus Dei. It also contains the Allegri Miserere, one of the most famous haunting choral compositions ever written because of the uses to which it was put by the Pope; and the Mozart Ave Verum Corpus, another very haunting choral composition only about 40 bars long but unforgetable.
"Are you restricted to choral?"
in short, no; but i do prefer choral music.
Well, I hope you are well heeled. We're all enthusiastic about our choices and we'll bankrupt you if you let us! :lol: I'll add some non-choral stuff later.
it is hard for me to describe the feelings i get when i hear a choir singing a piece of music written hundreds, thousands of years ago.
Okay, if you are willing to go back that far, I'm going to plug several of my really early personal favs:

Perotin's Beata Viscera (from about 1150 AD). Best version on disc is the performance by the Theatre of Voices under Paul Hillier, a hard disc to come by and not cheap. If you can't find that one, try The Hilliard Ensemble's Perotin disc.

Las Cantigas de Santa Maria by the Ensemble Unicorn on Naxos on a disc entitled Alfonso el Sabio (although he only compiled the music, he didn't "write" it as we know the term these days).

Utopia Triumphans by the Huelgas Ensemble, with a Tallis' Spem in Alium that will nock your socks off.

Abelard's O quanta qualia (available on Hilliard's "greatest hits" album Home for Thanksgiving for a pitance used at Amazon) and Planctus David (on Naxos' Medieval Christmas Carols).

Early Music Consort of London's Music of the Crusades, still available on cd after 30+ years in the catalog, probably the late David Munro's most enduring recording.

I WILL BE SURE TO PROVIDE FEEDBACK....
You better! Or we will come get ya . . . . :)
Corlyss
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Post by Auntie Lynn » Wed Aug 17, 2005 9:05 am

Sakura...

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Post by operafan » Wed Aug 17, 2005 2:13 pm

Debussy's Engulfed Cathedral - I have not found what IMO would be the definative version yet.

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Post by 12tone » Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:37 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
12tone wrote:I'm one of the biggest fans of a cd called Morimur and I can't recommend that cd enough!

It's on the label 'ECM New Series' and it has both choral work and the Partita in D minor (BWV 1004) for solo violin by JS Bach. The choral works are very short but sweet and also have a hint of 'eerieness' about them.

It's more of a concept cd in that it's based on findings of a researcher that found out some new information on the Ciaccona that Bach wrote...I'll leave you to read the story :)

I'd recommend it to you 100% Great singing and great violin playing!

Performed by:

The Hilliard Ensembled

Christoph Poppen - violin
Have we raked over these coals before? I know that this came up on either this or the other board, and I can't remember if you were one of the correspondents. I certainly don't want to start a flame war on the topic, but I think our readers need to have underscored what you yourself point out, that this is a "concept" cd. If anyone can get good vibes from it, I won't naysay them, but let it not be thought for a minute that there is any serious Bach scholarship involved in this at best fanciful "decoding" of the Chaconne.
What's wrong with the Morimur cd? No one seems to like it. Poppen took the Partita better than anyone else I've heard. Because of the cd concept and other material on there, it comes off as a very dark piece. I wish Poppen did the whole cycle of the solo violin partitas (there are 6 right?).

The singing is wonderful. I think the Hilliard Ensemble are great. How can you not take that cd seriously if only for the works themselves? Forget the concept! There's wonderful music on that cd :D

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:51 pm

I believe the reason people don't like it isn't as much the merit of the performance itself as how they're advertising it. They're advertising it like it's something 100% authentic that was just discovered, when it's apparently not.

That said, I haven't heard it yet and I'd like to.

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Don't forget the scandinavians!

Post by PJME » Thu Aug 18, 2005 5:53 am

Carl Nielsen's third symphony has a haunting slow movement!
(many good recordings - Bernstein and the Danish RSO are still impressive)
I pointed Finnish composer Erkki Melartin already out in an earlier post. Symphony nr 4 is one of those big,late Romantic works that sweep you away...:
"Symphony No. 4, Summer Symphony (1912): This was the favorite with concert audiences in Melartin's own day, and perhaps still is the favorite with listeners. A gem-like the second movement, Scherzo (Vivace), tells why. Play this movement (Disc 2, Track 6) if you want to make someone a fan of Melartin. It is an exuberant distillation of at least one aspect of the northern summer, like sunlight made audible. To my mind the third movement adds an element of wistfulness (the northerners' consciousness that winter is coming?) before a soloist and then three female voices together enter the work.

Raihala's essay for Finnish Music Quarterly magazine says the "Summer Hymn" that helps anchor the symphony is actually a melody of Swedish origin, though familiar to all Finns. It helps make this symphony a beautiful product of National Romanticism. If you like the voices in the second movement of Carl Nielsen's Symphony No. 3, you'll love the singing in Melartin's No. 4, which seems to me similar in spirit.
This may be one of his most visual works. At least the Finnish composer Leevi Madetoja, in his review of the Melartin Symphony No. 4, focused on the visual qualities of the music: "Seldom has the summer nature, its limpid, delicate landscapes, the hushed piety of the white summer night been described with such delightful and confident strokes of the brush."

Do give it a try.

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Post by 12tone » Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:15 pm

Harvested Sorrow wrote:I believe the reason people don't like it isn't as much the merit of the performance itself as how they're advertising it. They're advertising it like it's something 100% authentic that was just discovered, when it's apparently not.

That said, I haven't heard it yet and I'd like to.
The sound of Poppen's violin playing is unparalleled to me. Too many violinists seem to have this wirey sound to them. I like a flatter, more laid out ribbon-thick and 'juicy' sound. My favorite violinists so far are (and not compete and not in order):

-Poppen

-Manze

-Vengerov (whom I've only heard really do the Shostakovich VC #1 on Elatus)

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:29 pm

I should enjoy this, when I can get my hands on it, then....(all I've heard are Amazon samples)

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Post by Jack Kelso » Mon Aug 22, 2005 6:57 am

Does it get any more haunting than this?

Schumann's Violin Concerto and Schoenberg's "Transfigured Night".

Also, Vaughan Williams' "Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis".

Best regards,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:08 am

Jack Kelso wrote:Does it get any more haunting than this?

Schumann's Violin Concerto
Can't argue with you there. There is nothing more haunting than a work resurrected from the grave.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Jack Kelso » Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:20 am

jbuck919 wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:Does it get any more haunting than this?

Schumann's Violin Concerto
Can't argue with you there. There is nothing more haunting than a work resurrected from the grave.
Yes, and isn't it great that there are now so many violinists who have become devotees of this masterpiece?

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

mileschris

Post by mileschris » Sun Sep 25, 2005 2:19 pm

I picked up the Agnus Dei disc that Corlyss_D recommended. Very nice choice, Corlyss. Barber's "Adagio" is worth the price of admission alone. Allegri's "Miserere mei Deus (Psalm 51)" is very nice, too. Thanks for the recommendation, Corlyss.

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Post by miranda » Sun Sep 25, 2005 2:41 pm

great thread!

arvo part has created some really haunting works. tabula rasa and litany in particular are worth checking out.

both of the scandinavian composer nils okland's albums (bris, and straum, on the rune grammofon label) fit into this category.

and for choral music, i love sequentia's recording of hildegard of bingen's canticles of ecstasy; also la capella reial de catalunya's recording of le cant de la sibil-la: mallorca/valnecia 1400-1560.

and this is purely subjective, but i have always found mitsuko uchida's recording of schubert's piano sonata d. 960 to be as haunting as it is gorgeous.

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Post by Johnny » Sun Sep 25, 2005 3:30 pm

When we were in Dublin at the Cathedral of ST Patricks, I
heard the Choir of Men and Boys perform the Ave Verum Corpus.

This left a lasting impression on me.

For any of you that enjoy Choral Music, you must try the Luminosa
CD. This a Boy Choir from Britain. The CD is on Warner classics.

This entire CD is haunting ! Lacrymosa by Saint Saens, Sacris
Solemnis - Symphony No 7: Allegretto by Beethoven.

Last but not least is LaudateDominum from Vesparae with Maria
Zadori, Soprano and the Budapest Phil with Ivan Fischer.

These are just a sampling of the music I consider haunting. Now
if were to choose my " Desert Island Discs", that would be
very difficult. :)
I live my life one note at a time.

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Post by Gary » Sun Sep 25, 2005 5:53 pm

the works don't have to
be exclusively choral (sorry if i'm abusing classical terminology, still learning). i love eerie, creepy, haunting, etc music so any suggestions would be appreciated. thanks
Miles,

I recommend Khachaturian's ballet, Spartacus. This is, indeed, a haunting work. The Adagio Of Spartacus And Phrygia from the ballet is especially poignant. I read that it was used in the movie, The Hudsucker Proxy.

The ballet's Lament of Phrygia and Requiem is melancholy, and has some beautiful (albeit brief) choral moments.

You can hear samples here:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/de ... =classical

In case you would like the complete version, I recommend this (also, only this version contains the Lament of Phrygia and Requiem.):

http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.a ... =274076209
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Post by Febnyc » Mon Sep 26, 2005 6:46 am

Try Lament in Memory of Luigi Nono, by Giya Kancheli. If possible, listen with headphones.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:38 am

I'm going to have to second my reccomendation for Devil Doll. It's hard to get more haunting than that.

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Post by erinmr » Mon Sep 26, 2005 12:06 pm

What about Carl Orff's Carmina Burana? I suppose you could describe at least parts of this work as haunting...

~Erin

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Post by Lance » Mon Sep 26, 2005 2:32 pm

erinmr wrote:What about Carl Orff's Carmina Burana? I suppose you could describe at least parts of this work as haunting...

~Erin
Indeed it is ... a hauntingly beautiful work with its rhythms and interaction between chorus and orchestra. There are many great recordings, but the one I still favor is the Philadelphia Orchestra's under Eugene Ormandy, which has been issued at least twice on CD (recorded in the LP-analogue days) and still offers incredible sound.
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Post by Dalibor » Mon Sep 26, 2005 4:45 pm

There are a few film scores that are very haunting. Try choir section from 2001: Odissey in space or Mike Oldfields scoundtrack for "Killing Fields" - the track "Prans' Escape/The Killing Fields".

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2001 Gyorgy Ligeti

Post by PJME » Thu Sep 29, 2005 1:44 am

The choir sections from this film are by Gyorgy Ligeti : Lux Aeterna, and fragments from the Requiem for Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Two Mixed Choirs and Orchestra . This Requiem is in MHO one of the strongest works to survive from the 1960'ies. There are only 2 recordings available : on Wergo and -the more recent one - on Sony (Jonathan Nott and the Berlin Philharmonic ).

"Ligeti's music is always fresh, never predictable. Even 35 years on, the Requiem still seems a startling and often scary achievement, as its 100-strong choir builds up massive clusters of densely packed lines. The details are woven out of canonic and fugal techniques, the orchestra cutting through the swirling textures with laser-like accuracy, while at the same time some of the solo passages - a tumbling soprano line in the Tuba Mirum for instance - look forward to the surreal humour of Ligeti's only opera, Le Grand Macabre, written more than 10 years later. "(quote/Sony)

As for "haunting music" again, I'm a little bit surprised to see so few chamber/and /or vocal works.Here are some personal favorites. Some of the late Haydn pianotrios have extremely beautiful slow movements ,Schubert's Fantasie for 2 pianos,Heinrich Schutz' Psalmen Davids ,
Telemann's cantata "Du aber Daniel..."- the last movement is absolutely ravishing....(Cantus Colln/Junghanel) ("The real masterpiece, however, is the supremely beautiful funeral cantata, Du Aber, Daniel, Gehe Hin, the manuscript of which has only recently surfaced in a library in Berlin.")

, Chausson's "La chanson perpétuelle",Ravel's "Ma mère l'oye" (complete),Brahms songs for female choir, harps & horns....

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Post by MaestroDJS » Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:24 am

So many candidates for most haunting music... I had to think good and long about this. Then I chanced upon an excellent candidate which happened to be mentioned in a non-musical forum (of all places) as mood music: Franz Schubert's Piano Sonata (No. 21?) in B-Flat Major, D. 960, particularly the first 2 movements. This is music which sounds like it is trying to be happy, but has a strong undercurrent of sadness. The last 2 movements (scherzo and finale) almost succeed in being happy, but they can't completely shake off the sadness.

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