Looking for suggestions please

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Glenn

Looking for suggestions please

Post by Glenn » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:38 pm

Hi, I'm kinda new to classical music (well not new exactly, I've always had an appriciation of it, which is partly why I own and love the Lord of the Rings soundtrack)
I was wondering if anyone could suggest anything in particular for me to listen to, something along the lines Pachelbel's Canon in D major, Bach's Air on a G String and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, something that'll help me to relax, thanks

ch1525
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Post by ch1525 » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:54 pm

You're right about the Lord of the Rings soundtracks. They are really good and I think they had a big part to play in the movies' success.

You'd probably love Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21 K.467.

I'm sure you'd like all of the music on "The Most Relaxing Classical Album in the World.. Ever" After all, it is the "most relaxing classical album in the world... ever"

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/de ... l&n=507846

And Ralph would love it if you checked out some Dittersdorf. :o

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Post by Lance » Sun Nov 27, 2005 12:07 am

Hi Glenn, nice to have you visit here.

The music world is at your feet actually. There are so many wonderful choices that I'm almost hesitant to help you begin.

Mozart's Piano Concerto. No. 21 was suggested, but any of the piano concertos from Nos. 18 thru 27 you might enjoy. Beethoven's Symphony No. 7, Vivaldi's "Four Seasons," Sibelius's Violin Concerto, Mozart's Symphonies Nos. 40 and 41, Telemann's Water Music (Ebb und Fluht); Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks AND his Water Music.

This is just a beginning. You will obviously develop your own listening tastes as you hear some of the major works. If you find you like Mozart's concertos, delve into other major works of his.

You will find the whole listening process interesting and enjoyable!
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Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Nov 27, 2005 12:31 am

Hello Glenn,

I recommend Mozart's Sonata in A major, K 331, for piano. I love the zippy [Rondo] Alla turca!
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Post by Gary » Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:14 am

Someone will point this out eventually, so let me be the one. The "Air on the G String", apart from being an obviously humourous title to us English-speaking moderns, was actually a "redone" version of the Air to Bach's 3rd Orchestral Suite in D major BWV 1068 . The rearranger's name was August Wilhelm.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Eetu Pellonpää
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Post by Eetu Pellonpää » Sun Nov 27, 2005 5:30 am

If you like singing, I would recommend G. F. Händel's "sacred cantatas" (Salve Regina etc.)!

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Post by gfweis » Sun Nov 27, 2005 7:52 am

Hi Glenn. I think you might enjoy Ravel's piano piece, which is often presented in an orchestrated version, entitled Pavane for a Dead Princess (Pavane pour une Infante defunte). Also, check out Debussy's Preludes, Books I&II, which are also for piano.
Greg Weis

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Post by Lance » Sun Nov 27, 2005 11:48 am

Gary wrote:Someone will point this out eventually, so let me be the one. The "Air on the G String", apart from being an obviously humourous title to us English-speaking moderns, was actually a "redone" version of the Air to Bach's 3rd Orchestral Suite in D major BWV 1068 . The rearranger's name was August Wilhelm.
Not to knit-pick, but the transcriber's name was actually August (Emil Daniel Ferdinand Viktor) Wilhelmj, 1845-1908, the German violinist and educator. Wilhelmj is pronounced as vill-HELM-ee.
Last edited by Lance on Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Re: Looking for suggestions please

Post by Huckleberry » Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:41 pm

Glenn wrote:Hi, I'm kinda new to classical music (well not new exactly, I've always had an appriciation of it, which is partly why I own and love the Lord of the Rings soundtrack)
I was wondering if anyone could suggest anything in particular for me to listen to, something along the lines Pachelbel's Canon in D major, Bach's Air on a G String and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, something that'll help me to relax, thanks
Glenn, I suggest a collection of FAMOUS ADAGIOS. The Naxos Music Library, for example, has a three-volume Adagio collection covering the 18th and 19th centuries.

Adagios are conducive to serenity.
I finally know what I want to be when I grow up:
Chief Dog Brusher, Music Room Keeper, and Assistant Sunlight Manager
in a hillside Mansion for Ancient Musicians.

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Post by Gary » Sun Nov 27, 2005 6:38 pm

Lance wrote:
Gary wrote:Someone will point this out eventually, so let me be the one. The "Air on the G String", apart from being an obviously humourous title to us English-speaking moderns, was actually a "redone" version of the Air to Bach's 3rd Orchestral Suite in D major BWV 1068 . The rearranger's name was August Wilhelm.
Not to knit-pick, but the transcriber's name was actually August (Emil Daniel Ferdinand Viktor) Wilhelmj, 1845-1908, the German violinist and educator. Wilhelmj is pronounced as vill-HELM-ee.
Lance,

This in-depth information should be reserved for paying members. :)
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

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Post by Lance » Sun Nov 27, 2005 8:03 pm

Gary wrote:
Lance wrote:
Gary wrote:Someone will point this out eventually, so let me be the one. The "Air on the G String", apart from being an obviously humourous title to us English-speaking moderns, was actually a "redone" version of the Air to Bach's 3rd Orchestral Suite in D major BWV 1068 . The rearranger's name was August Wilhelm.
Not to knit-pick, but the transcriber's name was actually August (Emil Daniel Ferdinand Viktor) Wilhelmj, 1845-1908, the German violinist and educator. Wilhelmj is pronounced as vill-HELM-ee.
Lance,

This in-depth information should be reserved for paying members. :)
Thank you, Kind Sir! I just can't help it; it's all done in the spirit of spreading the word about classical music and its makers/creators. Every tidbit of information is interesting, at least to me.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Sun Nov 27, 2005 10:21 pm

Glenn,

Apart from the helpful suggestions supplied already, you might try to find a good classical radio station and start listening regularly, then take notes as to which pieces "grab" you.

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Nov 27, 2005 10:27 pm

Brendan wrote:Glenn,

Apart from the helpful suggestions supplied already, you might try to find a good classical radio station and start listening regularly, then take notes as to which pieces "grab" you.
Excellent suggestion, Brendan! It would have taken me much longer to figure out who had composed the ballet, Giselle, if it weren't for my local classical radio station.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Mon Nov 28, 2005 4:58 pm

Welcome, Glenn.

Some excellent recommendations have been made. For the criteria you mention, let me offer these: First, and easy to find - Nocturnes, Etudes and the Bacarolle of Chopin; the Nocturnes of John Field, and solo works by Albinez - (I have Barenbom's Albinez and it is fantastic).

But let me also recommend great recordings done for the harp by Andrea Vigh as well as those of Yolanda Kondonasis; Frits Kreisler's violin recordings, and Tommy Reilly's harmonica CD 'Serenade'.

For symphonies - Ralph Vaughn-Williams # 5 with Haitink, Brahms # 2; Bruckner # 5; Saint Saens Organ Symphony; and a unique piece 'Rustic Wedding Symphony' by Kark Goldmark.

Best wishes.
Cyril Ignatius

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