The Image Of Classical Music in the present day

Locked
DanielFullard
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 6:25 am
Location: Durham, England

The Image Of Classical Music in the present day

Post by DanielFullard » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:00 pm

So how is Classical Music percieved as we head into the year 2006? Amongst the general public I mean

Personally I still think here in a GB rife with anti-intellectualism the image of classical music is not changing. Its still regarded as 'boring', snobbish and 'only for posh people'. I live in a working class family and even my own family think its rather odd I listen to classical music....
Why is it that My 18 year old sister who is a very very intelligent girl and open minded about everything laughs at my interest in classical music?
Why did I get a sneer from Teens behind me when buying Gramaphone magazine in WHSMITH?


Its annoying but theres nothing we can do about it. All the consolation we have is that those people who laugh are just plain dumb. We dont laugh at thier ridiculous pop music!

But the image of classical music here in England seems to be still the same as it was 50 years...something inaccesible, boring and only for 'posh people'

Muriel
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Canada

Re: The Image Of Classical Music in the present day

Post by Muriel » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:08 pm

DanielFullard wrote:So how is Classical Music percieved as we head into the year 2006? Amongst the general public I mean


We dont laugh at thier ridiculous pop music!
I laugh at their ridiculous pop music. Fight fire with fire. Turn it up.

Classical music is alive and well somewhere in your neighbourhood ,try the music schools.

DanielFullard
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 6:25 am
Location: Durham, England

Re: The Image Of Classical Music in the present day

Post by DanielFullard » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:09 pm

Muriel wrote:
DanielFullard wrote:So how is Classical Music percieved as we head into the year 2006? Amongst the general public I mean


We dont laugh at thier ridiculous pop music!
I laugh at their ridiculous pop music. Fight fire with fire. Turn it up.

Classical music is alive and well somewhere in your neighbourhood ,try the music schools.
I know its alive..Im feeling it...but it still hasnt shaken off that 'stereotypical' image here in the uk

Cyril Ignatius
Posts: 1035
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:14 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Thu Dec 01, 2005 5:15 pm

I'm a college professor and get different varieties of the same response from students. The main response I would have to say ranges from an unknowing blank stare, polite tolerance on their part, and I suppose sometimes, outright boredom. In one classroom back in Wisconsin they used the term "long-hair music'.

I often try to spark interest interest in classical music among my students, often mentioning upcoming concerts at regional venues wherever I happen to be living and teaching. And I sometimes share stories from the concerts I regularly attend. I even play the occasional melody on the harmonica in class, which it seems they like, or at least prefer to what we otherwise might be doing. But I'm not sure my efforts are meeting with much success, and I agree with the other accounts here that that state of classical music in the public mind is pretty dim.

Part of what bothers me is that I sense many aren't getting the foundations in either the home or the schools, despite whatever glib words people attach to education or family today. And I suspect that is the heart of the problem.

I will continue to try to spread the gospel of classical music, and I hope others will. Maybe we really are making a difference, who knows.
Cyril Ignatius

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Thu Dec 01, 2005 7:09 pm

Well, when I was a youngster I was too cool for Pop, so went for the punk rock instead. These days I maintain that I'm still too cool for Pop, and often put it down publically, asking my friends why they are still listening to amplified nursery rhymes without the intelligent lyrics, or if they intend their musical development to remain so limited for life, or if they are simply so amenable to the advertising practices of today they buy product they rarely listen to just to be fashionable.

Deriding rockers as conformist mass-market fashion sheep is great fun if done in good humour (I have my own favourites too, and get as much curry back as I give), as rock was meant to be the music of rebellion. When rebellion against the prevailing culture is the prevailing culture it's against, well, why bother? I say I'm the real anti-establishment, anti-corporatist non-conformist by listening to classical instead of Pop.

Lark Ascending
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 1:53 pm
Location: Great Britain

Post by Lark Ascending » Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:22 pm

Living in Britain, I have to agree with Daniel that classical music is perceived as boring, pretentious music listened to by upper or middle class people - I have to confess that up until earlier this year I would have though the same. Thankfully I saw the error of my ways :lol: I do think that Classic FM has gone some way to redressing the balance. Yes, the majority of it's output is the "popular classics", and "modern" classical singers of the likes of Rene Fleming, which are not to my taste but if it serves to bring classical music to a wider audience then that has to be a good thing.

12tone
Posts: 304
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: BC, Canada

Post by 12tone » Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:02 am

Well when you think about it, when's the last time you played classical music loud in your car when driving on busy streets in town or the city with the windows down? What do you think people will do? My first thought would be: stare. How pretentious do you think that would look?

As much as I'd like to, I wouldn't get away with it as I would if I were blaring the 'Top 50' stuff -- music everyone knows pretty much.

I think it just comes down to having everyone see you as pretentious... buying magazines or going to concerts. As if 'your not good enough for popular music'.

Lark Ascending
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 1:53 pm
Location: Great Britain

Post by Lark Ascending » Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:18 am

It would make a pleasant change to hear VW or Chopin issuing forth from a passing car stereo as opposed to the rap (the c is silent, obviously) that assaults my ears on a daily basis.

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sat Dec 03, 2005 7:58 am

I don't think the world has changed that much. Neither has human nature. Teens and young adults generally need and seek acceptance and conformity serves that purpose. But teens also need their own gestalt, areas of shared interest which they enjoy and grownups don't.

Posters here who were atracted to classical music as kids tend to fall into two categories. The first is those who came from music-loving families where relationships were strong. The other is those who for some impossible to discover reason simply got turned on. I'm in the latter group.

Culture is so much more vivid and omnipresent than it was decades ago that the differences between those who enjoy majority interests and a minority who find companionship here are stark.

Last weekend my teenage son asked me to take him to a vegetarian/vegan restaurant on the Lower East Side called "teany" owned by some singer/composer I'd never heard of named Moby. Moby was actually there in his small eatery. On Monday I asked my class if they knew of Moby and all but one person raised his/her hand. If I had asked who was familiar with Bruckner or Sibelius (everyone will at least have heard of Mozart, Beethoven and Dittersdorf) I'd have been lucky to get any response.

It makes little sense to bemoan the status of classical music among kids. The fact is that conservatories are full of talented youngsters and concert halls have a fair if not major representation of younger attendees. I wouldn't recommend driving about town blasting Mahler with the windows down because that might just lead to a summons for noise pollution. But, by all means teens who enjoy classical music should invite friends to share their experience and if they won't, so what.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Dec 03, 2005 8:28 am

I never had the slightest interest in popular music. The exception would be show music and music of its type which was inspired by the European operetta tradition and is therefore essentially classically derived. But pop and rock in the modern sense bored my gourd off or even drove me up the wall even when I was a teenager. I know that "Hey Jude" is by the Rolling Stones (just kidding--I know it's really Peter Paul and Mary) because I couldn't help knowing it, but that's about it. I'd be pleased if I could forget even that.

I don't say that should be a norm for young people, but I do offer them the comfort if they know they only love classical that there is at least one other person in the world who is or was like them.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests