cornet...

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david johnson
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cornet...

Post by david johnson » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:40 am

inspired by another thread...

got any favorite cornet/orchestra licks??

such as...the solo in petrushka (not always performed on cornet, though).

bix beiderbecke. love that tone!!! go listen to some old jazz recordings for him.

dj

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Re: cornet...

Post by Lance » Tue Jan 10, 2006 12:54 pm

david johnson wrote:inspired by another thread...

got any favorite cornet/orchestra licks??

such as...the solo in petrushka (not always performed on cornet, though).

bix beiderbecke. love that tone!!! go listen to some old jazz recordings for him.

dj
This will probably be difficult to answer since most people would not know (or distinguish) the difference between the cornet and trumpet. Only a very few times have I seen the instrumentation so defined in credits.
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Post by Lance » Tue Jan 10, 2006 1:19 pm

Here's a few recordings I'm aware of that "spotlight" the cornet. Obviously there are others:

Alan Morrison, Alan (cornet) ASV CD 2062
'Cornet Roundabout' music by Arban, Mendez, Seibert, others [collection, 17 tracks] w/Grimethorpe Colliery Band, P Parkes, cond

Herbert L. Clarke (cornet) Crystal CD 450
Cornet Soloist of the Sousa Band solos

Gerard Schwarz (cornet) Elektra/Nonesuch CD 79157
Cornet Favorites w/R Barron, trombone, Kenneth Cooper, Piano

Manhattan Jazz Musical Heritage CD 512122F
Ruby Braff, cornet; Dick Hyman, piano

Detroit Concert Band Walking Frog CD 306 [5cd]
Marches concert pcs etc w/Leonard B. Smith, cornet;
Underwood, William E Lane, Earle L Louder etc
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johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Tue Jan 10, 2006 1:42 pm

The cornet solo in "Swan Lake" is a real beauty and fun to play.

Yes, the cornet is not easy for the average person to differentiate from the trumpet, but as long as the horn and the player are good, a difference can be discerned.

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Post by Haydnseek » Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:02 pm

A cornet is part of the ensemble in Stravinsky's "L'histoire du soldat."

Otherwise, I suppose 19th and early 20th century brass band music is where you'll find the cornet most often - along with traditional styles of jazz. The only cornet soloists I can think of are Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy McPartland, Bobby Hacket and Ruby Braff from the past, and Bob Barnard, Peter Eckland, Warren Vache and Jim Cullum in the present.

Another conical bore horn with a beautiful sound that you don't hear often enough is the flügelhorn. Vaughan Williams used it in a symphony (the 9th?.)

And then there's the cornetto which looks like this:

Image

or this:

Image
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Post by MahlerSnob » Tue Jan 10, 2006 3:25 pm

Cornet is called for in l'Histoire, but I don't know of anyone who actually plays the part on cornet. Most modern players play it on C trumpet.

There's some great cornet stuff in La Mer. There are also really fun parts in some of the romantic tone poems by Tchaikovsky, Charbrier, Elgar, etc.
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Lance
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Post by Lance » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:56 pm

Haydnseek wrote:A cornet is part of the ensemble in Stravinsky's "L'histoire du soldat."

Otherwise, I suppose 19th and early 20th century brass band music is where you'll find the cornet most often - along with traditional styles of jazz. The only cornet soloists I can think of are Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy McPartland, Bobby Hacket and Ruby Braff from the past, and Bob Barnard, Peter Eckland, Warren Vache and Jim Cullum in the present.

Another conical bore horn with a beautiful sound that you don't hear often enough is the flügelhorn. Vaughan Williams used it in a symphony (the 9th?.) [photo edited out]
The legendary Rafael Mendez also used the cornet on occasion, but it was the trumpet that made him famous. Then there was the great Maurice André who played all kinds of trumpets - and the cornet on occasion.
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Scott in VT
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Bixophilia

Post by Scott in VT » Tue Jan 10, 2006 10:02 pm

"bix beiderbecke. love that tone!!! go listen to some old jazz recordings for him."

I'm a serious Bix fanatic; have every note he ever played on CD. It was HIS interest in impressionism that got me interested in Debussy and Ravel.

And then there's that tone!

Charles
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Post by Charles » Thu Jan 12, 2006 11:10 pm

Haydnseek wrote:A cornet is part of the ensemble in Stravinsky's "L'histoire du soldat."

Otherwise, I suppose 19th and early 20th century brass band music is where you'll find the cornet most often - along with traditional styles of jazz. The only cornet soloists I can think of are Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy McPartland, Bobby Hacket and Ruby Braff from the past, and Bob Barnard, Peter Eckland, Warren Vache and Jim Cullum in the present...
Haydnseek, I almost always like your posts and I swear I'm not dissing you, but your leaving Louis Armstrong out of your list of cornet soloists is a staggering omission. Something like leaving George Washington out of the early history of the USA. Louis, the reigning genius of early jazz, the greatest soloist jazz produced save for Charlie Parker (it's a tie), the golden sun to Bix's silvery moon!!

For those who may not be aware of it, Louis' cornet and trumpet playing of the 1920s is a good deal greater than his horn playing was later in life. Of course it's not easy to tell when Louis gave up the cornet for good in favor of the trumpet, but one of his greatest recordings with his Hot Five, "Cornet Chop Suey" presents no such difficulty. In another great recording, "Big Butter and Egg Man," Louis mentions the cornet in an aside during his vocal. And in another masterpiece, "Muskrat Ramble," the sound of the horn is clearly mellow enough to be a cornet.

I would think that all the great records Louis made with Clarence Williams' Blue Five and Red Onion Jazz Babies bands, slightly earlier than the Hot Fives, were made on cornet. As were most of the immortal obligatto accompaniments he played for Bessie Smith and other blues singers.

George Mitchell is a fine cornet soloist on Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers records. King Oliver and Freddie Keppard are other New Orleans cornetists who recorded in Chicago in the 1920s.

I myself, based on my experience listening to New Orleans jazz, would define the sound of the cornet when played properly as 75% trumpet, 10% tenor saxaphone, 10% French horn and 5% Gray Poupon Honey Mustard. A wonderful instrument.

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Post by Haydnseek » Thu Jan 12, 2006 11:32 pm

Charles wrote:Haydnseek, I almost always like your posts and I swear I'm not dissing you, but your leaving Louis Armstrong out of your list of cornet soloists is a staggering omission. Something like leaving George Washington out of the early history of the USA. Louis, the reigning genius of early jazz, the greatest soloist jazz produced save for Charlie Parker (it's a tie), the golden sun to Bix's silvery moon!!
I think of him as a trumpet player, but you're right to remind me that he did some of his most important work on the cornet.
I myself, based on my experience listening to New Orleans jazz, would define the sound of the cornet when played properly as 75% trumpet, 10% tenor saxaphone, 10% French horn and 5% Gray Poupon Honey Mustard. A wonderful instrument.
:D :D :D
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david johnson
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Post by david johnson » Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:37 am

someone mentioned jimmy mcpartland. i got to attend one of his concerts. he was aged, but played really well and was quite nice to visit with. he used a goldplated cornet at the performance.

dj

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jan 14, 2006 12:36 am

Though it might seem that I should know something about this, and though I can distinctly remember being told as a small child the difference between a cornet and a trumpet by my father, the best I can do is a personal anecdote. Two years ago my father turned 76, and on his birthday card I wrote the following: "If you never make it to the number of cornets, at least you made it to the number of trombones."

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sat Jan 14, 2006 4:21 am

johnQpublic wrote:The cornet solo in "Swan Lake" is a real beauty and fun to play.
Which number or dance is that?
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

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johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Sat Jan 14, 2006 1:34 pm

#22 (in Act 3) Neapolitan Dance

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sat Jan 14, 2006 6:44 pm

Thanks, JohnQpublic.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jan 14, 2006 7:00 pm

Haydnseek wrote:A cornet is part of the ensemble in Stravinsky's "L'histoire du soldat."

Otherwise, I suppose 19th and early 20th century brass band music is where you'll find the cornet most often - along with traditional styles of jazz. The only cornet soloists I can think of are Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy McPartland, Bobby Hacket and Ruby Braff from the past, and Bob Barnard, Peter Eckland, Warren Vache and Jim Cullum in the present.

Another conical bore horn with a beautiful sound that you don't hear often enough is the flügelhorn. Vaughan Williams used it in a symphony (the 9th?.)

And then there's the cornetto which looks like this:

Image

or this:

Image
The fluegelhorn is a common band instrument and in my last church job, where I was privileged to work with the chief trumpeter of the US Army Band at Fort Meade, I accompanied him or played in ensemble with him a number of times when he preferred this sort of alto trumpet.

In baroque terms, "cornet" (pronounced kor-nay) is also a classic organ stop. It involves a composition of ranks at the level of 8', 4' , 2+2/23' and 1+3/5' and if you care to ask me what that means I will be happy to explain. Bach loved the cornet and in the only organ to which he was able to dictate the disposition insisted on having it on all three divisions.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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