Suggest Some Composers

Locked
Slaughterer
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:53 pm
Location: South Africa

Suggest Some Composers

Post by Slaughterer » Sat Jan 13, 2007 4:49 am

Hi everyone. I'm new to this forum.

I am looking to expand my knowledge base of classical music. I have always listened to some of the more famous composers such as Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Vivaldi etc.

I am now specifically looking for something where cellos and a bass undertone play a large role in the music.

I am not familiar with the technical terms, so please bare with me :) .

moldyoldie
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:51 pm
Location: Motown, USA

Re: Suggest Some Composers

Post by moldyoldie » Sat Jan 13, 2007 5:39 am

As a fairly recent "recruit" myself, let me offer my welcome.
Slaughterer wrote:I am now specifically looking for something where cellos and a bass undertone play a large role in the music.
A couple things popped into my head almost immediately:

Villa-Lobos: Bachianas Brasileiras No. 1; a great, semi-popular piece in three movements scored for eight cellos.

Mahler: Symphony No. 1; another popular work where the lower strings are most prominent.

Slaughterer
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:53 pm
Location: South Africa

Post by Slaughterer » Sat Jan 13, 2007 8:20 am

Thanx moldyoldie

Will give them a listen :D .

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:31 am

Welcome! Hope you join in our discussions regularly.

If you enjoy a deep bass sound, you must discover Dittersdorf, one of the greatest but least known (in America) composers.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

lmpower
Posts: 877
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 2:18 pm
Location: Twentynine Palms, California

Post by lmpower » Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:06 am

You might try the symphonies of Sibelius for some powerful deep bass sounds.

Slaughterer
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:53 pm
Location: South Africa

Post by Slaughterer » Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:30 pm

Thanks for replying and the suggestions.

Will certainly give them a listen. Hopefully finding some of the works will be easy :D

Brahms
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:21 pm

Post by Brahms » Mon Jan 15, 2007 4:25 pm

Brahms, Piano Concerto no. 1 in d minor, op. 15 (first movement esp)

ratsrcute
Posts: 365
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:01 pm

Re: Suggest Some Composers

Post by ratsrcute » Tue Jan 16, 2007 1:16 am

Slaughterer wrote:Hi everyone. I'm new to this forum.

I am looking to expand my knowledge base of classical music. I have always listened to some of the more famous composers such as Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Vivaldi etc.

I am now specifically looking for something where cellos and a bass undertone play a large role in the music.

I am not familiar with the technical terms, so please bare with me :) .
Welcome! Could you describe a little more about bass sounds and what you like about them? I mean, we could assume that you like bass because it's big and impressive, but perhaps you have other reasons.

If it is the big and impressive nature of bass that you like, have you thought about brass music? I have a CD of a trombone quartet called the Triton Quartet playing German music. They have an enormous sound, with gorgeous intonation. There's a baritone (singer) on the recording too, and amazingly enough he sounds like a trombone. He can get his voice to blend with trombones which are probably the loudest brass instruments (or close to it).
Enjoy your stay here,
Mike

walboi
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 7:31 am

Post by walboi » Tue Jan 16, 2007 4:37 am

Well a Orchestra has more than basses and cello's. There are no compositions entirely devoted to the lower strings. And your stepping into classical music via compositions with lots of basses and celli is a bit odd!

johnshade
Posts: 103
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 6:33 am
Location: ...between sunset and river

Post by johnshade » Tue Jan 16, 2007 8:25 am

One of the first composers I liked is Bela Bartok. I started with 20th Century composers and worked back in time. I suggest a disc with "Concerto for Orchestra" and "Music for strings, percussion and celesta".

I also suggest the tone poems of Richard Strauss -- Don Juan, Ein Heldenleben, Alpine Symphony, Don Quixote, Also Sprach Zarathustra, Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks. Strauss was a master of melody and orchestration.

JS

Slaughterer
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:53 pm
Location: South Africa

Post by Slaughterer » Tue Jan 16, 2007 5:13 pm

Could you describe a little more about bass sounds and what you like about them? I mean, we could assume that you like bass because it's big and impressive, but perhaps you have other reasons.
And your stepping into classical music via compositions with lots of basses and celli is a bit odd!
I primarily listen to metal, I have for quite a few years, but I have always enjoyed classical music, I'm trying to find something comparable to Wagner's work and compositions like Bach's Toccata and Fugue. I also particularly enjoy Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and various other works (and yes, I know these are some of the most popular, but I still like them). The bass adds power to the music for me, and that's what I love. In some works I enjoy the macabre atmosphere it creates.

I'm not sure if any of you have heard of a band called Apocalyptica. They used to do covers of Metallica entirely on cellos and are now doing their own thing. Might be going off topic now for a classical music forum, but what I'm getting at is that I love the sound of bass instruments. I don't always enjoy 'frilly' compositions so to say, like some of Vivaldi's.

Hope this clears up a few things :D
If not, let me know.

:: moldyoldie ::
Mahler: Symphony No. 1; another popular work where the lower strings are most prominent.
I have managed to find a CD of his 5th Symphony and i quite enjoy Sherzo. Thank you :). As for some of the other composers, I'm still trying to get hold of their music.

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Jan 16, 2007 9:35 pm

If you like metal and are looking for "Wagneresque" pieces, try the Bruckner symphonies. Maybe start with the scherzos to get the feel of them. Carmina Burana is also usually a hit with metal fans.

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26858
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Jan 16, 2007 9:50 pm

Brendan wrote:Carmina Burana is also usually a hit with metal fans.
So is the score of Jaws. I know, Brendan, that you were not intending to be condescending, but that is the impression one leaves on a board like this when one makes a recommendation based on what someone might like if he is a "metal fan."

A classic moment for bass is the scherzo from the Fifth Symphony of Beethoven, one of the great (and few) passages for the double bass section. Double bass players are still kept in shape by the awareness that they will from time to time be called upon to play this passage. That is what bass means in classical music, not emotive grumbles at the low end of the human hearing range.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

maskedman
Posts: 147
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: INDIAN WELLS CA.

Post by maskedman » Wed Jan 17, 2007 12:58 pm

[quote="jbuck919"][quote="Brendan"]Carmina Burana is also usually a hit with metal fans.[/quote]

So is the score of [i]Jaws[/i]. I know, Brendan, that you were not intending to be condescending, but that is the impression one leaves on a board like this when one makes a recommendation based on what someone might like if he is a "metal fan."

A classic moment for bass is the scherzo from the Fifth Symphony of Beethoven, one of the great (and few) passages for the double bass section. Double bass players are still kept in shape by the awareness that they will from time to time be called upon to play this passage. That is what bass means in classical music, not emotive grumbles at the low end of the human hearing range.[/quote]

Edgar Meyer.....

xiaopv
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:52 pm
Location: Binghamton, NY

Post by xiaopv » Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:42 pm

Maybe you want to give a shot to Elgar's Cello concerto.

IcedNote
Posts: 2963
Joined: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:24 pm
Location: NYC

Post by IcedNote » Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:13 pm

Welcome!

I'm also a huge metal fan...Deftones, old Metallica, Meshuggah, Cryptopsy, etc. 8)

I'll ignore your preference for bass and just recommend some darker composers/pieces that I enjoy.

Mahler: Symphonies 2 and 5
Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No. 4
Scriabin: Prometheus
Stravinsky: Rite of Spring
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5

That should be a good start.

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

BWV 1080
Posts: 4451
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 10:05 pm

Post by BWV 1080 » Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:36 pm

IcedNote wrote:Welcome!

I'm also a huge metal fan...Deftones, old Metallica, Meshuggah, Cryptopsy, etc. 8)

I'll ignore your preference for bass and just recommend some darker composers/pieces that I enjoy.

Mahler: Symphonies 2 and 5
Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No. 4
Scriabin: Prometheus
Stravinsky: Rite of Spring
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5

That should be a good start.

-G
For a Meshuggah fan, you ought to go darker than that:

Bartok: 3rd String Quartet, Miraculous Mandarin
Schoenberg: Perriot Lunaire
Shostakovich: Viola Sonata, 8th SQ
Ligeti: Piano Concerto, Cello Concerto
Lutoslawski: Chain 3, Piano Concerto
Carter: Piano Concerto, Concerto for Orchestra, 3rd String Qt
Schnittke: 5th Symphony, 3rd String Quartet
Dutilleux: Cello Concerto

RebLem
Posts: 9090
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Post by RebLem » Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:28 am

Well, lets see--

There are a few Double Bass Concerti around, and other pieces, most notably the Koussevitzky Double Bass Concerto. Koussevitzky was a great conductor who was a double bassist before he was a conductor.
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/alb ... m_id=25281

Here is a 3 CD set of all of Boccherini's 12 cello concerti.
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/alb ... _id=108815

Hindemith also embarked on a project to compose at least one sonata for every instrument in a symphony orchestra. He died before he could complete it, but he was well along. Here is a list of all his chamber music from ArkivMusic--he wrote a sonata for double bass, a sonata for bass tuba, 3 organ sonatas, and an octet and other pieces featuring double bass.
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Dri ... 1&genre=70

Schubert's Trout Quintet includes double bass. 76 listings for it at ArkivMusic. http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Dri ... mp_id=8620

Also, check out Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_bass
About 2/3 of the way through the Wiki article, there is a subheading called "Classical repertoire" that is about 2 1/2 full screens long.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:48 am

Here's something unusual, even unique perhaps. In May 1956, a group of professional and amateur 'cellists founded The Violoncello Society of New York. Two years later, 32 members of the society, under the direction of Villa-Lobos, recorded his Fantasia Concertante for Orchestra of Violoncellos, along with the composer's transcription of Bach's Preludes and Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier, again for an orchestra of 32 'cellists. It's on Everest 3024 (c.1959) and I don't know if it was remastered for CD.

P.S. It is written, on the back cover, that the aggregate value of the 32 'cellos thus gathered in the same room amounted, in the 1950's, to over $300,000.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

IcedNote
Posts: 2963
Joined: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:24 pm
Location: NYC

Post by IcedNote » Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:30 am

BWV 1080 wrote: For a Meshuggah fan, you ought to go darker than that:

Bartok: 3rd String Quartet, Miraculous Mandarin
Schoenberg: Perriot Lunaire
Shostakovich: Viola Sonata, 8th SQ
Ligeti: Piano Concerto, Cello Concerto
Lutoslawski: Chain 3, Piano Concerto
Carter: Piano Concerto, Concerto for Orchestra, 3rd String Qt
Schnittke: 5th Symphony, 3rd String Quartet
Dutilleux: Cello Concerto
All good suggestions...but I was just trying to ease him in a bit. ;)

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests