Violinist David Oistrakh & Taneyev's music

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Lance
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Violinist David Oistrakh & Taneyev's music

Post by Lance » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:51 am

Usually, when one speaks of violinists, we think of all those greats who emerged from the Leopold Auer (1845-1930) school. The legendary Polish violinist is remembered as the great teacher he assuredly was. Think Heifetz, Elman, Milstein for three among the most noted of twentieth century violinists who captured the world with their fiddles.

Then there's David Oistrakh, a personal favorite of mine who ranks right along side the three violinists mentioned above. Actually, Oistrakh was in a special place of his own. He was one of the greats who did not come under the arm of Leopold Auer.

Which brings me to Sergei Taneyev's (1856-1915) composition entitled Suite de concert, Op. 28, which was written expressly for Leopold Auer. A recent reissue appears on EMI 61571 (Great Recordings of the Century, mid-priced), coupled with Khachaturian's Violin Concerto in D Minor with the composer conducting. Nikolai Malko conducts the Taneyev piece (stereo, first appearing in 1957 (stereo) on LP. This is the second incarnation for the Taneyev release.

It took me a long time to appreciate the Taneyev piece. Of the works' five movements, it wasn't until the concluding movement (Tarantella) that I began to listen more intently to the first four movements and I have come to rather enjoy this music. Taneyev, a pupil of Tchaikovsky, shadowed his master and never achieved the same kind of fame as Tchaikovsky.

Tully Potter, one of England's most outstanding annotators, notes that David Oistrakh really made the Taneyev piece his own. It didn't matter that it was written for master-teacher Leopold Auer. Oistrakh was a pupil of Pyotr Stolyarsky, who produced as many (or more) superb violinists as Auer.

If it's been a while since you've heard the Taneyev Suite de concert, you might want to pull it out of the moth balls and give it a hearing. Under Oistrakh's hands, it's a legendary recording for sure.

Parenthetically, the Khachaturian Violin Concerto is also some masterpiece with Oistrakh. A mono recording originally published in 1955, the recording is not well balanced, with the violin being more prominent than it should. Oistrakh had asked Khachaturian to re-write the cadenza. The composer procrastined long enough for Oistrakh to write his own cadenza. Khachaturian loved it - and so it has remained. Aside from sound quality, the performance is riveting. It would be hard to imagine being any better played.
Lance G. Hill
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rasputin
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Post by rasputin » Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:06 am

Lance: it's debatable Milstein's as Auer's pupil. He denied that and criticized
Auer teaching, saying that he learned much more listening to the other kids
that Auer's advice.
About K.v.c..I've 4 0istrakh's recordings of the piece; 2 with the composer,
1 Ancerl and 1 Kubelik. All are great. But Igor's version with Goosens is IMO as good as any of papa's

Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:34 pm

rasputin wrote:Lance: it's debatable Milstein's as Auer's pupil. He denied that and criticized
Auer teaching, saying that he learned much more listening to the other kids
that Auer's advice.
From Virtuosi by Richard Freed:
Both Horowitz and Milstein had some renowned teachers, but their extraordinary native gifts were of greater consequence. Milstein has remarked that what one hears "about the great teachers amounts to no more than myths. Stolyarsky used to eat an egg when we played for him in Odessa, and Auer was really no teacher at all--he picked only students who didn't need him."

rasputin
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Post by rasputin » Tue Jan 23, 2007 7:37 pm

But we don't have to believe everything Nathan said, He had an acid sens
of humor. After all, Auer and Stoliarsky had some of the greatest violinists
of the 20th.century as pupils. And they were just kids when Auer took them
So,he had to teached them a lot. :wink: :wink:

pizza
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Post by pizza » Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:18 am

Stolyarsky used to eat an egg when we played for him in Odessa....."
What's wrong with eating eggs while listening to violins in Odessa? :?

Gary
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:16 am
Location: Houston, TX

Post by Gary » Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:14 pm

pizza wrote:
Stolyarsky used to eat an egg when we played for him in Odessa....."
What's wrong with eating eggs while listening to violins in Odessa? :?
Nothing, except that they're high in cholesterol.

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