Todays Purchases

DanielFullard
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Todays Purchases

Post by DanielFullard » Wed Nov 09, 2005 2:38 pm

Maybe we can keep this as an ongoing thread for all the purchases you mkae....Ill kick it off

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Picked these up today.....hope they are good

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Wed Nov 09, 2005 3:07 pm

We used to have an acquisitions thread. Maybe it can take off again.
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Wed Nov 09, 2005 4:04 pm

If Ralph displays the covers of every CD he buys on one of his average days (not a binge day) I predict the site will encounter storage problems within weeks. My occasional 30-at-a-time days (post xmas sale!) would be tedious to type in, so I doubt I'll bother.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Wed Nov 09, 2005 4:04 pm

The first one is on my "wish list" at Amazon.com. I should look into getting that one some time soon...hm.... :D

On the other hand....I have other stuff to get, too.

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Re: Todays Purchases

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Nov 09, 2005 5:40 pm

DanielFullard wrote:Maybe we can keep this as an ongoing thread for all the purchases you mkae....Ill kick it off

Picked these up today.....hope they are good
I don't think you will be disappointed in the Puccini or the Paganini. The Beethoven wouldn't have been even my 10th choice (see my post on the Beethoven program). But what we think isn't as important as what you think of them. So you have to tell us after you listen to them! :twisted:

I didn't buy anything today, but Sunday I picked up the soundtrack to The Constant Gardener and a couple of Ravi Shankar discs. :wink:
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Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Wed Nov 09, 2005 6:43 pm

Brendan wrote:If Ralph displays the covers of every CD he buys on one of his average days (not a binge day) I predict the site will encounter storage problems within weeks. My occasional 30-at-a-time days (post xmas sale!) would be tedious to type in, so I doubt I'll bother.
*****

Worry not-there's no way I can post album cover pictures.
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Gary
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Post by Gary » Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:26 pm

Question:

To post an image, do I simply right click and "copy" photo, then "paste" it here, and put the "Img" tags around it?
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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:45 pm

Gary wrote:Question:

To post an image, do I simply right click and "copy" photo, then "paste" it here, and put the "Img" tags around it?
Depends on where the image is. It has to be on the Internet somewhere. If it's only on your own hard drive, it won't work.
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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:08 am

Well...in the spirit of the thread...these aren't exactly purchases from today, but they're recent ones.


And, as promised....

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I'm not a good writer, so I'll just say a short piece about each one...in the case of these....well, it's Sibelius, and I've enjoyed the recordings alot. I consider everything except for Finlandia to be of very high quality here. (to my ears at least)


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These two are very nice recordings...enjoyable, worth the money. However, if you have a substantial amount of recordings of either of the works I wouldn't recommend them unless you MUST hear a new interpretation, however, I don't regret spending the money.


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The Takacs Quartet....well, their recordings of Beethoven's work made me able not only to tolerate, but to fall in love with string quartets when it was omething I just couldn't enjoy before no matter how good of a quartet I was hearing....they just have a certain special charm. These recordings were given awards for a reason. Need I really say more?


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Unfortunatley, this has left me a bit cold, so far...(no pun intended) although I love the storyline. I think lieder (at least traditional lieder without orchestral backing) may simply not be my forte, so to speak. I'll have to give this and my other lieder album that I own some more listens, though.


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Now this...this is EXCELLENT. I've heard that it's considered one of the greatest recordings of Sceheherazade, and I can see why.


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As I mentioned earlier this leaves me cold right now...there's not much else to say at this point.

And...this is in the mail:

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Last edited by Harvested Sorrow on Fri Nov 11, 2005 12:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Gary » Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:12 am

Thanks.

Just previewed an image (which I didn't post). So, it's got to be a URL between the Img tags.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Nov 10, 2005 3:28 am

The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
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DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Nov 10, 2005 9:24 am

Corlyss_D wrote:The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
Seconded.

Some wonderful additions, Sorrow. Though Davis would not be my first choice, it is a decent set and collecting Sibelius is never wrong! (Except when Rattle's leading?) I don't know Nakamatsu but love the Rach and bet Rochester's better than many big name bands. I like the Takacs LvB SQs very much--especially these late ones, which my betters turn their noses up at--and their Bartok is award-winning for good reason. The Winterreise is a "classic" and reminds me to check out more of Matthias Goerne's lieder recordings. And Solti's CSO Brahms is a great bargain set. Looks as if you're in for many hours of happy listening!
Last edited by DavidRoss on Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:50 am

Todays Purchases....

Maria Callas: The platinum collection

matti
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Post by matti » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:02 am

Harv, who is Nakamatsu? Is he good or were those cds just so cheap you decided to give them a try?

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:12 am

matti wrote:Harv, who is Nakamatsu? Is he good or were those cds just so cheap you decided to give them a try?
He's a high quality pianist, however, don't expect a genius. I'd say the Amazon reviews give pretty good descriptions of his works. I bought them when he was a guest musician with the San Antonio Symphony. (He played Mozart's piano concerto no. 27 that night)

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:21 am

DavidRoss wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
Seconded.

Some wonderful additions, Sorrow. Though Davis would not be my first choice, it is a decent set and collecting Sibelius is never wrong! (Except when Rattle's leading?) I don't know Nakamatsu but love the Rach and bet Rochester's better than many big name bands. I like the Takacs LvB SQs very much--especially these late ones, which my betters turn their noses up at--and their Bartok is award-winning for good reason. The Winterreise is a "classic" and reminds me to check out more of Matthias Groene's lieder recordings. And Solti's CSO Brahms is a great bargain set. Looks as if you're in for many hours of happy listening!
I've looked in various places, some say that Davis set is up there with the best...some don't think so. No accounting for taste, I suppose. Why don't you recommend a set of Sibelius symphonies for me to look into later? I have a particular affinity for the Takacs...however, this is probably because this is the quartet that made it possible for me to listen to (read: TOLERATE) and learn to enjoy string quartets. As for the Solti Brahms....yes, so I've heard. :D I also picked it up because it apparently has a very good production as compared to some others and there is also attention payed to the bass (the production isn't very trebly), for lack of a better way to put it. Made me think it'd be a good starter set since I'd hear everything clearly and get to know the music, as opposed to recordings that focus on certain elements of the music. :)

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:23 am

Corlyss_D wrote:The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
Would pics (just for the fun of it) and information on what we think of the recordings do? It wouldn't be too hard to do both.... :wink:

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Nov 10, 2005 1:34 pm

Harvested Sorrow wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
Would pics (just for the fun of it) and information on what we think of the recordings do? It wouldn't be too hard to do both.... :wink:
A compromise? Sure. I'm game.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Nov 10, 2005 1:51 pm

DanielFullard wrote:Todays Purchases....

Maria Callas: The platinum collection
Daniel!!!!! Outstanding!!!!!

How many CDs and what operas?
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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 2:14 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Harvested Sorrow wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:The pics take up too much space. If it ain't landscapes, personally I'd rather read writin' than look at pics. I'd much rather hear what you guys think of what you bought than just look at cd covers.
Would pics (just for the fun of it) and information on what we think of the recordings do? It wouldn't be too hard to do both.... :wink:
A compromise? Sure. I'm game.
I'll get the post edited in due time. :)

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Nov 10, 2005 2:46 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
DanielFullard wrote:Todays Purchases....

Maria Callas: The platinum collection
Daniel!!!!! Outstanding!!!!!

How many CDs and what operas?
3 Cds and contains bits from loads of operas

12tone
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Post by 12tone » Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:55 pm

I bought these today:





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Image

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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:10 pm

Harvested Sorrow wrote:Why don't you recommend a set of Sibelius symphonies for me to look into later?
Plenty of time for that ahead. The Davis set is a fine choice to begin your acquaintance with Sibelius. Chances are you'll just shrug your shoulders and say "What's the big deal?" at first. Give it some time and come back to it in a month or two. If you eventually get hooked and want more, then browse the Sibelius topics on the other forum. There you'll find my recommendations and those of many other Sibelius admirers.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Post by 12tone » Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:31 pm

I have the Sibelius symphonies by Maazel / Wiener Phil on London. The symphonies I find are kind of cold. I'll keep trying.

Maybe Maazel was a bad place to start?

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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:08 pm

12tone wrote:I have the Sibelius symphonies by Maazel / Wiener Phil on London. The symphonies I find are kind of cold. I'll keep trying.

Maybe Maazel was a bad place to start?
Well, it was repeated listening to the Maazel Vienna set that finally opened my ears--but I was pushing 50 by the time I finally warmed to Sibelius.

Hmmm...when I was younger, Sibelius and RVW sounded almost like elevator music to me. I figured it was music for old men who were tired and just wanted to rest. Real music, music with hair on its chest, music for virile young men, was the dashing stuff of Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky and Stockhausen, music that shouted and could not be ignored, music that pounded its chest and challenged all comers to the best two falls out of three.

But now that I am older and wiser my tastes have changed. I realize that those old guys were probably onto something all along. Don't get me wrong; I still admire Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky, and probably more now than ever. But I've learned to love music that whispers its secrets instead of shouting, music that gradually reshapes my way of hearing, that quietly invites me to enter, then seduces me into staying--offering a glimpse of eternal beauty, endless fascination, and depths that can never fully be known.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:25 pm

DavidRoss wrote:
Harvested Sorrow wrote:Why don't you recommend a set of Sibelius symphonies for me to look into later?
Plenty of time for that ahead. The Davis set is a fine choice to begin your acquaintance with Sibelius. Chances are you'll just shrug your shoulders and say "What's the big deal?" at first. Give it some time and come back to it in a month or two. If you eventually get hooked and want more, then browse the Sibelius topics on the other forum. There you'll find my recommendations and those of many other Sibelius admirers.
On the contrary....I've heard a bit of Sibelius before and I've loved (most) everything I've heard from the set. :D I'm having a bit of trouble with the fifth, however, I've only listened to everything once so far, and I believe that was simply because it seemed so...brazen, from what I remember, compared to the sort of misty, naturalistic vibe I get from the other symphonies. I'm sure that if I take it on it's own later it will be fine. I'll be sure to check that forum for references to sets I should look into later.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:42 pm

DanielFullard wrote:3 Cds and contains bits from loads of operas
Well, two you have to get if you don't get any others are her Tosca with Gobbi and her Traviata. Both on EMI. Do you have a copy of the Penguin Guide To Compact Discs?
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:19 pm

I'd add to that her Medea with Bernstein. Scary.

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Post by 12tone » Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:53 pm

DavidRoss wrote:
12tone wrote:I have the Sibelius symphonies by Maazel / Wiener Phil on London. The symphonies I find are kind of cold. I'll keep trying.

Maybe Maazel was a bad place to start?
Well, it was repeated listening to the Maazel Vienna set that finally opened my ears--but I was pushing 50 by the time I finally warmed to Sibelius.

Hmmm...when I was younger, Sibelius and RVW sounded almost like elevator music to me. I figured it was music for old men who were tired and just wanted to rest. Real music, music with hair on its chest, music for virile young men, was the dashing stuff of Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky and Stockhausen, music that shouted and could not be ignored, music that pounded its chest and challenged all comers to the best two falls out of three.

But now that I am older and wiser my tastes have changed. I realize that those old guys were probably onto something all along. Don't get me wrong; I still admire Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky, and probably more now than ever. But I've learned to love music that whispers its secrets instead of shouting, music that gradually reshapes my way of hearing, that quietly invites me to enter, then seduces me into staying--offering a glimpse of eternal beauty, endless fascination, and depths that can never fully be known.
Ever wondered about writing liner notes? Wow. :D

Myself, it's not so much elevator music as it's just cold. Sibelius is almost too modernist for me right now (his symphonies that is). I'm really having trouble with those symphs right now.

I'll keep on trying though.

Whew. And I still have all of the Dvorak symphonies to go through as well. But those are boring for a different reason -- the first couple symphonies sound a bit...'immature'? Hope I don't offend anyone here. Awesome music, just not edited enough to my ears.

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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Fri Nov 11, 2005 1:00 am

DavidRoss wrote:
12tone wrote:I have the Sibelius symphonies by Maazel / Wiener Phil on London. The symphonies I find are kind of cold. I'll keep trying.

Maybe Maazel was a bad place to start?
Well, it was repeated listening to the Maazel Vienna set that finally opened my ears--but I was pushing 50 by the time I finally warmed to Sibelius.

Hmmm...when I was younger, Sibelius and RVW sounded almost like elevator music to me. I figured it was music for old men who were tired and just wanted to rest. Real music, music with hair on its chest, music for virile young men, was the dashing stuff of Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky and Stockhausen, music that shouted and could not be ignored, music that pounded its chest and challenged all comers to the best two falls out of three.

But now that I am older and wiser my tastes have changed. I realize that those old guys were probably onto something all along. Don't get me wrong; I still admire Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky, and probably more now than ever. But I've learned to love music that whispers its secrets instead of shouting, music that gradually reshapes my way of hearing, that quietly invites me to enter, then seduces me into staying--offering a glimpse of eternal beauty, endless fascination, and depths that can never fully be known.
Excellent post! Now THAT is something I can identify with, haha. I love the power in the works of the composers you mentioned, however, I've fortunately moved past that stage where I can't appreciate anything that doesn't have that sort of force behind it, already.... :)

I agree with 12tone, you should be writing liner notes!

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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Nov 11, 2005 1:25 am

DavidRoss wrote: Hmmm...when I was younger, Sibelius and RVW sounded almost like elevator music to me. I figured it was music for old men who were tired and just wanted to rest. Real music, music with hair on its chest, music for virile young men, was the dashing stuff of Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky and Stockhausen, music that shouted and could not be ignored, music that pounded its chest and challenged all comers to the best two falls out of three.

But now that I am older and wiser my tastes have changed. I realize that those old guys were probably onto something all along. Don't get me wrong; I still admire Beethoven and Mahler and Stravinsky, and probably more now than ever. But I've learned to love music that whispers its secrets instead of shouting, music that gradually reshapes my way of hearing, that quietly invites me to enter, then seduces me into staying--offering a glimpse of eternal beauty, endless fascination, and depths that can never fully be known.
Beautifully put, David. Sounds almost like it comes from Corinthians. :wink:
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Post by rogch » Fri Nov 11, 2005 8:04 am

I very much like the Sanderling set on Brilliant classics. Very cheap (as usual) and the sound is better than on many other Brilliant Classics recordings. You also get a disc of tone poems as a bonus. The problem is that you get hooked of course, and then you perhaps want the best indivdidual recordings of at least some of the works. But i have managed to resist the temptation so far...

Another great Sibelius conductor is Pavo Berglund and (reportedly) von Karajan, i haven't heard the latter.
Roger Christensen

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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:08 pm

rogch wrote:I very much like the Sanderling set on Brilliant classics. Very cheap (as usual) and the sound is better than on many other Brilliant Classics recordings.
Thanks for the recommendation, Roger. I was wondering about that set.
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Post by rogch » Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:06 am

I can still recommend it, even though i have found out that there is more than one way to get an affordable Sibelius collection. But of course the prize is not the only reason to buy this set. Sanderling hardly puts a foot wrong, does he?
Roger Christensen

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Post by premont » Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:49 am

My purchases today:

Bach: Brandenburg concertos played by the Danish National Radio chamber orchestra conducted by Mogens Wöldike (recording from 1950-54) with Knud Hovaldt playing trumpet and the composer Herman D. Koppel playing harpsichord among others. Sound is excellent for the time and interpretation competent, distinguished, human, more convincing than most of the contemporary recordings by Münchinger ,Reiner, Klemperer, Haas, Sacher, Haarth et.c. Only the Archive recording from 1950-53 by August Wenzinger is IMO more rewarding.

Bach: Cellosuites / Antonio Meneses on Avie (haven´t heard them yet).

A compilation called: Twenty great pianists, containing among others a recording of Beethovens Appassionata sonata from 1951!! with Gilels and Rachmaninoffs recordings of his own 2. and 3. pianoconcerto.

Mozart: Pianosonatas / M J Pires on Brilliant Classics. This is the recording she made for the Japanese firm Denon when about 30 years old.

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Post by jserraglio » Sat Nov 12, 2005 8:53 pm

-- Handel, L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato. Gardiner/Erato

-- Lili Boulanger, Du fond de l'abîme · Psaume 24 · Psaume 129 · Vielle prière Bouddhique · Pie Jesu. Markevitch/Everest

-- Poulenc, Complete Chamber Music, vols. 1-5. Naxos

Burchest
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Post by Burchest » Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:49 pm

Ordered these from Tower;
Hummel - Serenades
Hummel - Mass in D minor

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Post by MaestroDJS » Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:03 am

The past few weeks have been pretty busy. Denise & I spent the first week of November in New York State for a book tour, and we also spent a terrific evening with Ralph. Last week I was in Toledo, Ohio for an engineering project, and later this week I'll visit St. Louis, Missouri. Toledo is within a reasonable driving distance from Chicago, so I normally rent a car and bring extra equipment with me. I returned home Friday but need not return the rental car until Monday, so Saturday I had the bright idea to revisit my alma mater, the University of Illinois at Urbana.

You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy. Although I feel quite comfortable driving through urban areas like New York or Chicago, I grew up in a small town in Illinois, so I was in my element an absolutely gorgeous autumn Saturday, driving lonely straight but well-paved country roads for over 100 miles (160 kilometers) between the Chicago suburbs and Urbana. Along the way I dodged stray cows, sheep and goats, as well as deer hunters (and along the way I played those 2nd-hand CDs of the complete Max Bruch works for violin and orchestra, which I bought 2 months ago at Encore Recordings, Ann Arbor, Michigan). It's pretty cool to consider that the University of Illinois is one of the finest engineering schools in the nation. When I was a student in the late 1970s, the rankings were roughly #1 = MIT, #2 = Stanford and #3 = University of Illinois. Woohoo! We're Number Three! We're Number Three!

And of course no visit to my old campus is complete without raids upon some 2nd-hand book and record shops in Urbana, such as Priceless Books and Record Swap. Saturday my loot included:
Amongst his CD acquisitions, Dave wrote:Antonín Dvorák (1841-1904), Bohemia / Czech Republic:

Overtures: Vanda, My Home, In Nature's Realm, Carnival, Othello. BBC Philharmonic Orchestra / Stephen Gunzenhauser. Naxos 8.550600 (Germany).

Symphonic Poems: My Home, The Water Goblin, The Noon Witch, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Wood Dove, The Hero's Song. Scottish National Orchestra / Neeme Järvi. Musical Heritage Society 523031L (2 CDs) (United States).

Harold Shapero (1920- ), United States:

Nine-Minute Overture; Symphony for Classical Orchestra. Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra / André Previn. New World Records NW 373-2 (United States).
Amongst his LP acquisitions, Dave wrote:Ferruccio Busoni (1866-1924), Italy / Germany:

Piano Concerto in C Major; Zwei Studien zu "Doktor Faust": Sarabande und Cortége. John Ogdon, Piano; Royal Philharmonic Orchestra / John Alldis Choir / Daniell Revenaugh. Angel SBL 3719 (2 LPs) (United States).

Arrigo Boïto (1842-1918), Italy:

Mephistofele: Opera in 4 Atti. Nicolai Ghiaurov, Bass; Luciano Pavarotti, Tenor; Mirella Freni, Soprano; etc. Trinity Boys Choir; London Opera Chorus; National Philharmonic Orchestra / Oliviero de Fabritiis. London LDR 730010 (3 LPs) (United States).

César Franck (1822-1890), Belgium:

Piano Quintet in F Minor. Idil Biret, Piano; London String Quartet. Finnadar Records SR 9035 (United States) + Mahler: Piano Quartet in A Minor.

Charles Gounod (1818-1893), France:

Saint Cecilia Mass. Pilar Lorengar, Soprano; Heinz Hoppe, Tenor; Franz Crass, Bass. Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, Paris / Jean-Claude Hartemann. Angel S 36214 (United States).

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), Bohemia / Austria:

Piano Quartet in A Minor. Idil Biret, Piano; London String Quartet. Finnadar Records SR 9035 (United States) + Franck: Piano Quintet in F Minor.

Darius Milhaud (1892-1974), France:

Symphony No. 3 with Chorus; Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra. Elisabeth Brasseur Chorale. Ina Marika & Geneviève Joy, Pianos. Orchestre de la Société des Concerts / Darius Milhaud. Westminster WST-17101. (United States)

Otto Nicolai (1810 1849), Germany:

Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor. Karl Ridderbusch, Helen Donath, Wolfgang Brendel, Trudeliese Schmidt, Claes Haaken Ahnsjö, Lilian Sukis, Alexander Malta. Chor und Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks / Rafael Kubelik. London OSA13127 (3 LPs) (United States).

Miklós Rózsa (1907-1995), Hungary / United States:

Overture to a Symphony Concert; Three Hungarian Sketches; Hungarian Nocturne (Notturno Ungherese); Theme, Variations and Finale. RCA Italiana Orchestra / Miklós Rózsa. RCA CL25010 (United Kingdom).

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975), Soviet Union:

The Age of Gold: Ballet Suite; The Bolt: Ballet Suite. Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra / Maxim Shostakovich. Melodiya / Angel SR-40062 (United States).
The Dvorák CDs reminded me of some recent discussions about Concert Overtures and Symphonic Poems. Composers write concert overtures before Franz Liszt invented the symphonic poem, and afterward they tended to compose one or the other. Dvorák composed several of both forms. What's the difference? Not much, although his concert overture Vanda was part of an unpublished opera, and My Home was part of incidental music. His other 3 concert overtures, In Nature's Realm, Carnival and Othello, form a trilogy and they have only general programs. Maybe the difference is that symphonic poems tend to be longer and have more specific programs than concert overtures.

One of my favorite works by Miklós Rózsa is the excellent Theme, Variations and Finale (and in fact it was one of several models for my contrabassoon concerto: Theme and Variations in G Minor for Contrabassoon and Orchestra). I first became seriously interested in Rózsa and his music a few years ago when in a 2nd-hand CD shop I found a CD reissue of the New York Philharmonic Debut by Leonard Bernstein of Sunday, November 14, 1943. This was the legendary broadcast concert in which the 25-year-old and relatively unknown Assistant Conductor Leonard Bernstein substituted for the ill Guest Conductor Bruno Walter. Theme, Variations and Finale happened to be on the program, and Rózsa later described it as one of the most vital performances the piece has ever received. Bernstein became famous as a result of that concert. Later I bought the excellent series of Rózsa orchestral works by James Sedares and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, and the above LP of Rózsa conducting his own music (the very same works in the first Sedares CD) is outstanding.

Dave

David Stybr, Engineer and Composer: It's Left Brain vs. Right Brain: best 2 falls out of 3
http://members.SibeliusMusic.com/Stybr
Theme and Variations in G Minor for Contrabassoon and Orchestra
http://www.SibeliusMusic.com/cgi-bin/sh ... reid=47429
World Première: 25 & 26 Feb 2005

Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to author Denise Swanson
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
Murder of a Smart Cookie
Penguin Putnam ~ Signet, New York, NY

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Tue Nov 15, 2005 1:38 pm

Just Under £20 for this pair of beauties

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jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Nov 15, 2005 7:48 pm

Louis Kentner Plays Liszt Vox 2-CD
Guiomar Novaes and Otto Klemperer Vox 2-CD
5 volumes of Poulenc Complete Chamber works on Naxos
all priced @ a buck per item @ Half Price Books

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Post by Lance » Tue Nov 15, 2005 11:30 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
rogch wrote:I very much like the Sanderling set on Brilliant classics. Very cheap (as usual) and the sound is better than on many other Brilliant Classics recordings.
Thanks for the recommendation, Roger. I was wondering about that set.
These are outstanding performances and represent an exceptional value. I have them and enjoy them enormously. It's a great bargain, to boot, too!
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Lance
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Post by Lance » Tue Nov 15, 2005 11:42 pm

Harvested Sorrow wrote:
matti wrote:Harv, who is Nakamatsu? Is he good or were those cds just so cheap you decided to give them a try?
He's a high quality pianist, however, don't expect a genius. I'd say the Amazon reviews give pretty good descriptions of his works. I bought them when he was a guest musician with the San Antonio Symphony. (He played Mozart's piano concerto no. 27 that night)
Nakamatsu ranks, IMHO, among the top today. On recordings, you must try to hear his recording of Joseph Wölfl's (1773-1812) four piano sonatas on Harmonia 907324! This is rarely heard music that has been beautifully recorded.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Nov 17, 2005 8:57 am

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jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Nov 19, 2005 5:20 am

<div align="center">Miklós Rósza
Concertos for Violin & Cello</div>
<div align="center"><img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0000 ... ZZZZZ_.jpg" width="180" height="170"></div>

Harvested Sorrow
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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Sat Nov 19, 2005 1:03 pm

Lance wrote:
Harvested Sorrow wrote:
matti wrote:Harv, who is Nakamatsu? Is he good or were those cds just so cheap you decided to give them a try?
He's a high quality pianist, however, don't expect a genius. I'd say the Amazon reviews give pretty good descriptions of his works. I bought them when he was a guest musician with the San Antonio Symphony. (He played Mozart's piano concerto no. 27 that night)
Nakamatsu ranks, IMHO, among the top today. On recordings, you must try to hear his recording of Joseph Wölfl's (1773-1812) four piano sonatas on Harmonia 907324! This is rarely heard music that has been beautifully recorded.
I'm aware of that recording, but thank you. I wasn't quite of the quality of the pieces being played so I wondered about purchasing it. I'll make sure to get to that at some point, now. :)

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:24 am

In case anyone is interested, Barnes & Noble has many items on sale now at its website. I bought four major label CDs for US $12.98 each. Barnes & Noble "Members" get a further discount. The sale ends tomorrow November 21st.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:27 pm

<tr><img src= "http://footlight.com/img/product/125/31561.jpg"></tr>
Kalman, Countess Maritza
World Premiere Complete Recording - The Original 2003 Ohio Light Opera Cast Recording
Live recording with complete dialogue.
Operetta Archives--3 CDs

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:29 am

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jwinter
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Post by jwinter » Thu Dec 01, 2005 9:48 am

Nice choice, Daniel, I think you'll enjoy the Tate :)

Just got in a large order from BRO. On a whim, I picked up the Mahler symphony cycle from Emil Tabakov/Sofia Philharmonic. I've heard 7 & 9 so far (while driving, granted, so I was a bit distracted), and at this point I'm pleased with the purchase. It's not going to displace Bernstein or Abbado, but the Bulgarian orchestra is pretty well-recorded and plays this music with character and verve. So far so good, particularly at BRO's price -- recommended as a second opinion for those suffering from "Mahleritis"... :lol:

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Post by karlhenning » Thu Dec 01, 2005 9:57 am

Picking up extra Mahler on a whim -- jwinter, I worry about you, fella! 8)
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
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