Todays Purchases

Cyril Ignatius
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Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:14 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:18 pm

I've just had a mini splurge:

a CD version of one of my favorite LPs - Mascagni's Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo's I Pagliacci, Von Karajan conducting

An Evening with Nicolai Ghiaurov

Angela Gheorghiu's Puccini CD

And two DVD copies of the movie musical "The music Teacher" to replace and uprade on the VHS I've loved so much.
Cyril Ignatius

Eetu Pellonpää
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 4:31 pm

Post by Eetu Pellonpää » Thu Mar 02, 2006 2:33 am

Image

6 CDs of Grieg conducted by Neeme Järvi! :D

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:55 pm

4 CDs arrived today from ArkivMusic, all from cpo, which they had a sale on recently.

1) Johann Ernst Hartmann (1726-93): Complete Symphonies (4)--Concerto Copenhagen, Lars Ulriik Mortensen, hpsi, and music dir.

2) Gade: Violin Sonatas 1-3--Dora Bratchkova, violin, Andreas Meyer-Hermann, piano

3) Otto Klemperer: Syms 1 & 2, Merry Waltz, Marcia funebre, Recollections, & Scherzo--Alun Francis, cond Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

4) Ernst Toch: String Quartets 7 & 10--Buchberger Quartett
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Richard Mullany
Posts: 203
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:12 pm
Location: Waynesville, NC

Post by Richard Mullany » Fri Mar 17, 2006 9:33 am

The first purchase in a couple of years; Chadwick: Melpomene, Rip Van Winkle, Symphonic Sketches, Tam O'Shanter. Jarvi DSO
I've gotten most of Chadwicks works now, I really find his music very enjoyable. Jarvi has recorded most of it I believe.

Richard Mullany
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Location: Waynesville, NC

Post by Richard Mullany » Fri Mar 17, 2006 4:14 pm

Panzerfaust wrote that he was afraid some Shubert might "be weighty" I wish he would amplify that remark as I wonder what, if anything, is wrong with weighty. I would expect weightiness in classcal music, Shubert is, while at times tuneful, at other times very serious. An example that comes to mind is the slow movement in the Quintet; this may be the weightiest music ever penned, it is sublime and deadly serious. The funeral march from the "Eroica", the Bach C minor Prelude and Fugue, the ending of Mahlers ninth symphony, all very weighty. Understand, I'm not trying to be picky; I'm really interested in what is meant by weighty. I do want to welcome you to the world of good music and record collectiing too.
So, I hope you share your thoughts with me, with us.

Panzerfaust
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 9:04 pm
Location: New England

Post by Panzerfaust » Sat Mar 18, 2006 1:19 pm

Weighty was probably a poor choice of words. As I mentioned earlyer I am very much an outsider, not an expert. What I probably meant was something more along the lines of austere, difficult to fathom or appreciate. I think this is what most of the general public thinks of classical music in general.
I now have 4 Schubert c.d.s and I don't think he is at all difficult to appreciate. The odd thing however, is that I can't quite put my finger on what it is I like about his music, even though he is becoming one of my favorite composers.
As for weighty music, I really have no problem with it. As I said, it was simply an inept word choice. I quite dig things that are heavy and weighty in music. I am an expert regarding extreme heavy metal, and as the name implies, there is quite a bit of heavyness and weightyness going on in that genre.
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jserraglio
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Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Sat Mar 18, 2006 4:13 pm

Hildegard von Bingen. Canticles of Ecstasy. Sequentia on BMG.
Chant vol. 3. Angel.
Herrmann. Vertigo on Varese Sarabande.
----------------------------------------------
Bach, Brandenburgs with Britten/ECO. London 2LP set.
Harry Belafonte, At Carnegie Hall. RCA 2LP set, LSO 6006.
Brahms, Symphony 2. Ormandy/PO. ML 4827.
Brahms, Symphony 1. Bernstein/NYP. MS 6202.
Brahms, Serenade in D. RCA LSC 2976.

Harvested Sorrow
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Post by Harvested Sorrow » Sat Mar 18, 2006 6:41 pm

Panzerfaust wrote:As for weighty music, I really have no problem with it. As I said, it was simply an inept word choice. I quite dig things that are heavy and weighty in music. I am an expert regarding extreme heavy metal, and as the name implies, there is quite a bit of heavyness and weightyness going on in that genre.
Is your name based on the Darkthrone album?

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sat Mar 18, 2006 8:54 pm

Panzerfaust wrote:Weighty was probably a poor choice of words. As I mentioned earlyer I am very much an outsider, not an expert. What I probably meant was something more along the lines of austere, difficult to fathom or appreciate. I think this is what most of the general public thinks of classical music in general.
I now have 4 Schubert c.d.s and I don't think he is at all difficult to appreciate. The odd thing however, is that I can't quite put my finger on what it is I like about his music, even though he is becoming one of my favorite composers.
As for weighty music, I really have no problem with it. As I said, it was simply an inept word choice. I quite dig things that are heavy and weighty in music. I am an expert regarding extreme heavy metal, and as the name implies, there is quite a bit of heavyness and weightyness going on in that genre.
I know I am going to hear wailing and gnashing of teeth for saying this, but I think Schubert is a bit overrated. Not a lot, mind you. He is, undeniably, a great composer. But just a bit overrated.

Many people still start to learn an instrument when the are young. This is less common among the middle classes than it once was, though Venezuela has had a wonderful program for teaching classical music to young people for quite a number of years. Many people do not pursue these studies. They find themselves playing scales and etudes by the likes of Muzio Clementi and all sorts of other also-rans. Often, Schubert is the first great composer they encounter, because his music is relatively easy to play, at least competently. For people who continue their studies, he has a special place in their hearts, and, perhaps, for those who do not, he may be the ONLY great composer whose work they have actually played. This breeds a certain affection for the man.

Perhaps you like it because you can imagine a friend or someone close to you learning to play it, whereas work that sounds fiendishly difficult seems more remote.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Panzerfaust
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Post by Panzerfaust » Sun Mar 19, 2006 2:06 pm

Harvested Sorrow, yes, my name is partialy derived from the Darkthrone album, but also from the WWII german weapon of the same name:

Image

And the translation, which is "armored fist."

RebLem, if Schubert is underated or overated I don't know, as I have virtualy no freinds to talk about classical music with. I have never played any of his music, the only instrument I have ever seriously tryed to learn is the electric bass. And I don't think I like Schubert's music because of simplicity, because I usualy like complex music.

Anyway, here are my most recent purchases:

Schubert & Schumann - Wanderer-Fantasie & Fantasie
Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique
Sibelius - Finlandia & Valse Triste
Saint-Saëns - Danse Macabre & Phaéton & Le rouet d'Omphale & Introdution et Rondo Capriccioso & Sympony #3
Workers of the World Unite!
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RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Wed Mar 22, 2006 4:23 pm

Just picked up my first shipment from Berkshire Record Outlet at the post office today. It contains the following items:

1) Albeniz: PC 1--Zedda, cond. Orchestra di Torino |Villa-Lobos: PC 5--Villa-Lobos, cond Vienna SO, Felicial Blumenthal, pn Dureco Ars Classicum

2) Beethoven: Syms 3-9--Wyn Morris, cond. 5 CDs

3) Mahler: Syms 1-9: Sym 10:Adagio--Emil Tabakov, Sofia (Bulgaria) Phil.--15 Capriccio CD set

4) Balada, Leonardo: Hangman, Hangman! |The Town of Greed--Colman Pierce,cond., Carnegie Mellon Contemporary Ensemble--Naxos

5) Beethoven: Piano Concerti 2, 5--Dame Myra Hess, M Sargent, BBC Sym Orch--BBC Legends

6) Coates, Gloria: String Quartets 2,3,4,7, & 8--Kreutzer Qt--Naxos

7) Dukas, Paul: Complete Piano Music--Chantal Stigliani, pn--Naxos

8 ) Granados: 12 Spanish Dances--Rosa Torres-Pardo, pn--Naxos

9) Ives: Concord Sonata; Varied Air & Variations; The Celestial Railroad; Transcription from "Emerson", #1--Steven Mayer, pn, Kerry Shale, reader--Naxos

10) Liebermann, Rolf: Concerto for Jazz Band and Sym Orch; 4 other orchestral worksGunter Neuhold. cond., Bremen Phil + soloists--Naxos

11) Moszkowski: Piano Concerto in E Major, Op. 59; From Foreign Lands, Op. 23--Markus Pawlik, pn, Wit, cond., Polish National RSO--Naxos

12) Silver, Sheila: Piano Concerto; 6 Preludes for piano on poems of Baudelaire--Alexander Paley, pn, Gintaras Rinkevicius, cond., Lithuanian State Sym Orch.

13) Smith, Richard W: Moutain Requiem--Mountain Chorale & Orch, Robert Breault, tenor, Richard Smith, cond.--AUR, Arizona Univ Recordings, www.AURec.com

14) Strauss: 9 Songs with Orch.--Gundula Janowitz, sop.; Oboe Conc.--Ray Still, oboe; Metamorphosen--Richard Stamp, cond., Academy of London; Violin Sonata--Dmitri Sitkovetsky, vn, Pavel Gililov, pn--2 Virgin CDs

15) Turina: Complete works for piano trio (4)--Trio Arbos--Naxos

16) Zyman, Samuel: Quintet for Winds, Strings, & Piano; Solamente, a cycle of 4 songs on poems by Salvador Carrasco; Concerto for Piano and Chamber Ensemble--various artists. Antilles
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:20 pm

Just arrived today--

From ArkivMusic, 2 issues--Beethoven:Syms 1 & 2--Wyn Morris, LSO. I recently bought the Syms 3-9 from Berkshire, and wanted the first two to make a complete set. Also, the Bach Brandenburg Concerti from The Akademie fur Alte Musik, Berlin. Lots of folk here & in GMG have recommended this, so it better be good. If I don't like it, I'll track you down. :D :D :D

Oh, yesterday, I got 7 CDs from Arkiv. The Reiner CD of Rossini Overtures, and 3 double CDs from Ess.a.y Recordings, on which Arkiv has a sale, of the complete solo piano music of Mily Balakirev by Alaxander Paley.

Then, also arrived today, from CD Universe, the hard to find 13 CD set from Nuovo Era of the complete piano music of Robert Schumann by Jorg Demus. I have this set on LP from MHS, but Nuovo Era issued it on CD. I had ordered it about 6 months ago from ArkivMusic, but they cancelled the order a couple months later due to unavailability. I think I tried a couple other places, too. Found it listed at CD Universe, but it said its availability was limited, and did I want to be notified when it was available? I said yes. About a week later (that was about 4-5 weeks ago) they sent me a notice that I could order it; I did, and it arrived today.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
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Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Sat Apr 01, 2006 5:25 pm

<div align="center">Image

Mahler, Symphony No. 5. Anton Nanut/Ljubljana


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Leonard Bernstein's Candide (DVD)</div>

Gary
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:16 am
Location: Houston, TX

Post by Gary » Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:52 pm

Image
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Barry
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Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:50 pm

Post by Barry » Tue Apr 04, 2006 12:41 pm

From my local Tower, the new recordings of the Brahms' D-Minor concerto by Zimerman, Rattle and the BPO and the Tchaikovsky fifth by Eschenbach-Philly.

From HMV-Japan, the Giulini-VPO Brahms cycle (symphonies and Requiem) on DG and a couple discs with performances by the Ormandy-Philly on their 1958 Soviet Union tour. One includes a performance of the Prokofiev 5th concerto with Richter.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Apr 09, 2006 2:59 pm

Image Image Image Image Image<img src="http://i23.ebayimg.com/04/i/05/93/02/48_1.JPG" width="150" height="115">
(Ormandy/PO)
1. ML 5292 (1955) R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op. 45
2. ML 5201 (1956) Tchaikovsky: The Swan Lake - Ballet Suite
3. ML 5166 (1952, 1955) Johann Strauss: Fledermaus Overture
4. ML 5221 (1956-1957) Schubert: Symphony No. 8 / Mendelssohn: "Midsummer Night's Dream"
5. ML 5316 (1953-54) Haydn: Symphony No. 99 / No. 100 "Military"
(Reiner/CSO)
6. LSC 2318 Rossini Overtures

RebLem
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JUST ARRIVED FROM AUSTRALIA

Post by RebLem » Mon Apr 10, 2006 8:53 pm

About a week ago, I recieved news from Richard Eddy @ Buywell.com in Western Australia that an order I had placed a little less than 2 weeks before that had been shipped. I just received it here in Albuquerque today, Mon., 10 APR 2006--

1) Trombone Concerti by Gordon Jacob, Philip Bracanin, Neil Currie, & Georg Christoph Wagenseil, TT: 70:35--Warwick Tyrrell, trombone, Adelaide Sym Orch, 2 conductors.--ABC (Australian Broadcasting Co) label.

2) Handel: 5 Cantatas, TT also 70:35--Arcadia, Jacqueline Ogeil, dir, rec 2004 @ Carmelite Monastery in Melbourne--Tall Poppies label--I got this because I was very impressed by a CD the same group made in the same venue of cantatas by Buxtehude.

3) Beethoven: Missa Solemnis--Sir Charles Mackerras, cond. Sydney Sym Orch & Choir--ABC Classics Eloquence. rec. C. 1987

4) Schubert: Rosamunde-Complete Incidental Music--Munchinger, Vienna Phil Orch and Vienna State Opera Chorus--Decca Eloquence

5) Schumann: Complete works for oboe--Drei Romanzen, Op. 94; Studien fur den Pedal-Flugel, Op 56, transcribed for oboe by Larry Sitsky; Phantasiestucke, Op 73; Stucke im Volkston, Op. 102; Adagio & Allegro, Op. 70; Abendlied, Op. 85 # 12 (arranged by Joseph Joachim) TT: 70:40--David Nuttall, oboe, Larry sitsky, piano--Tall Poppies label. Rec 1992 in Canberra.

6) Brahms: Sym 1, Tragic Over--Bohm, BPO (Sym), VPO (Over) TT: 56:33--DGG Eloquence--The recording is a 1960 performance that I have on LP, and finally found on CD. It is my # 1 fave performance of the 1st, and IMO, absolutely the best MOR interpretation on disc.

7) Margaret Sutherland (1897-1984): Concerto for String Orch; Concerto Grosso; Violin Concerto; Haunted Hills. TT: 73:10--various Australian orchestras and soloists--ABC Classics Eloquence

8 ) Cyril Scott (1879-1970): 7 solo piano works, incl. Piano Sonata # 1, all composed from 1904-1912 TT: 79:27--Dennis Hennig, piano--ABC Classics Eloquence

9) Shostakovich: Piano Quintet; Piano Trio 2. TT: 62:46--The Australia ensemble, resident at the Univ. of New South Wales, rec 1992-3--Tall Poppies

10) Rautavaara: 2 Preludes and Fugues for cello & piano (1955); Sonata for Cello solo (1969); Sonata #1 for cello & piano(1972-2001); Polka (1977) for 2 cellos & piano; Sonata for cello & Piano (1991)--David Pereira, cello, Ian Munro, piano, Bonnie Smart, 2nd cello in Polka--Tall Poppies. TT:66:02--Tall Poppies

11) Myroslav Gutej: Piano Sonatas 1, 3-7 No timings listed anywhere--Myroslav Gutej, piano, rec 2001--KWA Records, www.kwarecords.com
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

premont
Posts: 659
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 2:15 pm

Post by premont » Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:44 am

Beethoven:

pianosonatas no.s:

1,2,4,5,6,7,8,12,13,14,17,19,20,21,24,30,31,32.

Bruce Hungerford.

Does someone know, how many of the sonatas he achieved to record other than the above mentioned - if any?

I had ordered a bunch of Beethoven sonatas by Sergio Fiorentino too, but they are unfortunately out of print. Does someone know, how many of these he has recorded?

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:47 pm

Just arrived from BRO today, Thurs., 13 APR 2006--

1) Beethoven, Mendelssohn Violin Concerti--Ferras, Sargent (B) & Silvestri (M).
2) Elgar and Walton String Quartets--Britten Quartet
3) Schoenberg, Webern, Berg: Complete Piano works--Elisabeth Klein.

4) Haydn: Symphonies 94, 103--Collegeum Aureum.
5) Mozart: Complete Symphonies--Graf, Mozarteum Orch, Salzburg--13 CDs
6) Mozart: Syms 22-30, 32-34--Kuhn, Mozarteum Orch, Salzburg--3 CDs
7) Mozart: Syms. 25, 28, 29, 33, 35, 36, 38-41--Ernest Bour, SWF Sym Orch, Baden-Baden. 4 CDs.
8 ) Mozart: Syms. 36, 38, 40, 41--Tate, ECO. 2 CDs

9) Mozart: Syms 35, 40, 41--Paillard, ECO.
10) Mozart: Syms 33, 35, 36--Collegeum Aureum.
11) Mozart: Syms. 38, 39, Rondo, K. 373--Collegeum Aureum
12) Mozart: Haffner Serenade; Contredanses, K. 609--Collegeum Aureum.
13) Mozart: Marriage of Figaro--Fritz Busch, Glyndebourne Festival (1934) 2 CDs

14) Foote: Piano Trios 1, 2;Melody for Violin & Piano, Op 44 (1899); Ballade for Violin & Piano, Op. 69 (1910)--Arden Trio
15) Foote: Piano Quintet, String Quartets, Op. 32 & 70--Da Vinci Quarter, James Barbagallo, piano
16) Nielsen: Complete works for solo piano--Annie Oland, pn.
17) Nielsen: 2 Violin Sonatas--Lydia Mordkovitch, violin, Clifford Benson, piano.

18 ) Schoenberg: Cello Concerto; Piano Concerto; Chamber Sym 2; Die Gluckliehe Hand--Craft, Philharmonia Orch, Simon Joly Cho, several soloists
19) Britten: Songs--Robert Tear, tenor, Philip Ledger, piano--2 EMI
20) Walton: Violin Sonata, Piano Quartet--Kenneth Sillito, violin; Robert Smissen, viola; Stephen Orton, cello; Hamish Milne, piano.
21) Walton: Sym 1; Crown Imperial; Orb & Sceptre--Previn, Royal Phil Orch
22) Shostakovich: Piano Quintet; String Quartets 4, 7--Schidlof Quartet, Ian Brown, piano.

AND A FEW NON-CLASSICAL ITEMS--

23) Girl Crazy--NOT an original cast rec--Rec 1951.
24) Lady in the Dark--NOT an original cast--Rec 1941.
25) Tony Bennett--15 Songs, incl. Blue Velvet, Rags to Riches, Solitaire, Sing, you sinners, Boulevard of Broken Dreams, & Stranger in Paradise.
26) The Weavers--20 songs. Rec 1950-52.
12)
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Tue Apr 25, 2006 11:02 pm

Just arrived today, Tues, 25 APR 2006--

A 2 CD set from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra first issued last year as part of its annual fund raising Radiothon, entitled "A Tribute to Pierre Boulez," featuring Boulez conduting the following:

Boulez: Fanfare for the 80th birthday of Sir Georg Solti (6:00)--11/92

Boulez: Livre pour cordes (10:13)--12/99

Mahler: 3 Ruckert Lieder with Jose van Dam (12:00)--11/96

Strauss: Till Eulenspiegel's lustige Streiche, Op. 28 (15:28 )--11/95

Bach/Schoenberg: Prelude & Fugue in E Flat Major (Saint Anne), BWV 552 (15:39)--12/91

Debussy: Symphonic fragment from Le martyre de Saint Sebastian (20:50)--12/95

Messiaen: L'ascension (21:49)--11/96

Janacek: Glagolitic Mass--4 singers, David Schrader, organ, CSO Chorus (42:58 ) 11/2000
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Mark Antony Owen
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2006 5:46 pm
Location: Hampshire, UK

Post by Mark Antony Owen » Thu Apr 27, 2006 3:26 pm

My latest delivery from www.castleclassics.co.uk promises to make for interesting listening.

With these two discs, I've completed my survey of Vieuxtemps' Violin Concerti on Naxos:

Image Image

While with these five CDs, I'm continuing my exploration of everything played by German cellist, Maria Kliegel (who records exclusively for Naxos, and whose playing I find utterly irresistible):

Image Image Image Image Image

Am going to play the Kodaly right away while I attend to the dishes ...
"Neti, neti."

Formerly known as 'shadowritten'.

Gary
Posts: 1802
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:16 am
Location: Houston, TX

Post by Gary » Thu Apr 27, 2006 5:16 pm

Shadowritten,

Do the liner notes to the Chopin recording mention that someone else had a hand in composing some of this music--that someone being Chopin's good cellist friend, Auguste Franchomme :?:

I know for sure that Franchomme was involved in composing the Grand Duo Concertante on themes from Meyerbeer's opera Robert le Diable. But how about the other works :?:
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Mark Antony Owen
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2006 5:46 pm
Location: Hampshire, UK

Post by Mark Antony Owen » Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:02 pm

Gary wrote:Shadowritten,

Do the liner notes to the Chopin recording mention that someone else had a hand in composing some of this music--that someone being Chopin's good cellist friend, Auguste Franchomme :?:

I know for sure that Franchomme was involved in composing the Grand Duo Concertante on themes from Meyerbeer's opera Robert le Diable. But how about the other works :?:
Hi Gary

Grabbed this for you from the Naxos site:

Among the compositions of Chopin for instruments other than the piano are three works for cello and piano. The most substantial of these is the Sonata in G minor, Opus 65, written in Paris in 1845 and 1846. It was dedicated to his friend, the cellist Auguste Franchomme, and the last three movements were played in 1848 by Franchomme and Chopin at the latter's last concert. The first movement, marked Allegro moderato, starts with the first phrase of the first subject, played by the piano and then taken up and extended by the cello. There is a B flat major second subject and this leads, after a closing passage, to the central development, which opens with a reference to the principal theme and continues with delicate exploration of other keys and an abridged recapitulation. The D minor Scherzo allows the cello the opening melody, before a more equitable division of labour. To this the D major trio section acts as a foil, with the cello now enjoying melodic prominence, before the return of the scherzo. There is a shift of key to B flat major for the slow movement Largo, opening with a singing cello melody, taken up gently by the piano. The last movement opens dramatically enough, the piano theme taken up by the cello, which later introduces the contrasting second subject, presented simply enough at first, before being offered in a varied form, with cello double-stopping and allowing, from the piano, a resumption of the tarantella rhythm that dominates the movement, gathering energy as the end approaches. The piano writing is characteristic throughout, but the voice of the cello remains clearly differentiated.

The first work for cello and piano in order of composition, the Polonaise brillante in C major, Opus 3, was written in 1829 and 1830 and published the following year in Vienna. Chopin had received encouragement from Prince Antoine Radziwill and it was during a visit to his estate in the autumn of 1829 that he wrote the Polonaise to which he later added an Introduction. In a letter to his friend Titus Woyciechowski he described it as a brilliant drawing-room piece suitable for the ladies and designed for the Prince's daughter, Princess Wanda, Chopin's pupil, who played it with her father, who played the cello. The published work was dedicated to the Warsaw cellist Joseph Merk. The Introduction, marked Lento, opens with a piano flourish, after which the cello introduces part of an expressive melody, interrupted by the piano. The cello resumes, leading to the principal theme of the Introduction. The music moves dramatically into the minor and the section ends with a cadenza, in the edition by Emanuel Feuermann entrusted to the cello. The Alla Polacca, better suited, perhaps, to the abilities of the Radziwills, allows the cello the first attempt at the polonaise theme, which is then taken up by the piano. Again, in the present edition an element of virtuosity is entrusted to the cello, in a linking passage that leads back to the principal theme. There is a heartfelt F major theme from the cello, but it is the principal theme which eventually dominates.

The Grand Duo Concertant in E major is very different in origin. It is based on themes from Meyerbeer's opera Robert le Diable, a work that strongly impressed Chopin when he first arrived in Paris, though his taste for this kind of grand opera diminished as time went on. The work was first staged at the Opéra on 21st November 1831 and won astounding success. Pianists in Paris, Thalberg, Herz, Adam, Kalkbrenner and Liszt, tumed to it for transcriptions, fantasies and other derivative works. In his own Grand Duo based on themes from the opera Chopin collaborated with the cellist Auguste Franchomme, who rewrote the cello part of the earlier Polonaise brillante and arranged for cello and piano two Nocturnes by Chopin and possibly other works.

The piano opens the C sharp minor Introduction, marked Largo, allowing only the briefest appearance of the cello, before announcing the first theme, marked Andantino. The work makes use of the first act Romanza and the chorus Non pietà from the same act, as well as the fifth act Le mie cure ancor dei cielo, among other elements from the opera, and is in a style well able to hold its own with the transcriptions and arrangements of other Paris piano virtuosi.

The present release ends with four transcriptions of piano works for ce1lo and piano, a practice that continues the work of Franchomme in this respect. The Nocturne, B.I. 49 dates from 1830 and was published sixteen years after Chopin's death. The present arrangement is by the great cellist Gregor Piatigorsky. The well known Étude, Opus 25, No.7, from the second set of studies, here in a transcription by Glazunov, transposed from C sharp minor to E minor, has a melody that lends itself well to the cello, as does the gentle melancholy of the Waltz, Opus 34, No.2, of 1831, transcribed by the Russian cellist Lev Ginzburg. The final transcription, of the Étude, Opus 10, No.6, dating probably from the summer of 1830, Chopin's last summer in Warsaw, provides a moving postscript, the transcription and transposition from E flat minor to D minor by Glazunov.


Hope this helps. :D
"Neti, neti."

Formerly known as 'shadowritten'.

Gary
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Post by Gary » Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:17 pm

Thanks a lot, Shadowritten! :D
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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:22 pm

Gary wrote:Thanks a lot, Shadowritten! :D
No problem - you're welcome.

Naxos always put all of their sleeve notes in full on their website, so if you ever need to check out any future details of their discs, just head over to www.naxos.com - look for the 'About this recording' link when you access the track listings of individual CDs.

Incidentally, the Kodaly disc I listened to earlier is superb and highly recommended. :wink:
"Neti, neti."

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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon May 01, 2006 2:11 pm

Well, last weekend, I was at the semi-annual Seattle Public Library book sale, which usually means choice classical LPs I wanted for a long time (as well as some goodies for my little internet business), but this time the pickings were slim......it could do, partly, to my being in a semi-invalid state, 3 weeks after my hospital stay, and having to bump shoulders with dozens of other shoppers. I never could totally focus my mind on finding real rarities or some nice paperback novels to send to my parents.

I DID, however, find a few LPs for myself:

Bizet's Symphony In C & Glazunov's arrangement of Schumann's Carnaval (Goehr/LPO, on Camden 193).....could this have been the FIRST RECORDING of the Bizet?;
Borodin's Second & Steppes Of Central Asia (Maag/Philharmonia Hungarica, on Turnabout 34273);
Dvorak's Slavonic Dances (Dorati/Bamberg, on Turnabout 34672);
Respighi's Pines & Fountains (Quiadri/VSOO, on Westminster 5167);
Dvorak's Scherzo Capriccioso (Swoboda/VSO, on Westminster 5029);
Debussy's Images #1 & #3 (Monteux/SFSO, on Camden 161).
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

miranda
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Post by miranda » Fri May 05, 2006 2:10 pm

Bella Terra--Arianna Savall

The daughter of the great Montserrat Figueras had a more ethereal, less throaty and rich voice than her mother, but hers is no less beautiful. On this album, she accompanies her singing of mostly Catalan folk songs on the harp, which she plays wonderfully. A worthwhile album.

Image

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Post by RebLem » Fri May 05, 2006 5:17 pm

I just ordered the Dorati box of all the Haydn Symphonies from ArkivMusic yesterday.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri May 05, 2006 8:48 pm

miranda wrote:Bella Terra--Arianna Savall

The daughter of the great Montserrat Figueras had a more ethereal, less throaty and rich voice than her mother, but hers is no less beautiful. On this album, she accompanies her singing of mostly Catalan folk songs on the harp, which she plays wonderfully. A worthwhile album.
I heard her and her family on Saint Paul Sunday Morning in Jan 05. I thought the song she sang from the album was lovely. As you note, she's not her mom, but then billions aren't.
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Post by Ralph » Fri May 05, 2006 9:17 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
miranda wrote:Bella Terra--Arianna Savall

The daughter of the great Montserrat Figueras had a more ethereal, less throaty and rich voice than her mother, but hers is no less beautiful. On this album, she accompanies her singing of mostly Catalan folk songs on the harp, which she plays wonderfully. A worthwhile album.
I heard her and her family on Saint Paul Sunday Morning in Jan 05. I thought the song she sang from the album was lovely. As you note, she's not her mom, but then billions aren't.
*****

She's young and will develop more as a singer.
Image

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat May 06, 2006 2:27 am

RebLem wrote:I just ordered the Dorati box of all the Haydn Symphonies from ArkivMusic yesterday.
I don't think you will be disappointed.
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Sun May 07, 2006 6:19 am

From arguably my favourite 'part-time' composer:

Image

Mark Antony Owen
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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Sun May 07, 2006 6:21 am

keninottawa wrote:From arguably my favourite 'part-time' composer:

Image
I own this. You'll love it! :wink:
"Neti, neti."

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Post by RebLem » Mon May 08, 2006 6:59 pm

RebLem wrote:I just ordered the Dorati box of all the Haydn Symphonies from ArkivMusic yesterday.
It arrived today. :D
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue May 09, 2006 1:21 am

RebLem wrote:
RebLem wrote:I just ordered the Dorati box of all the Haydn Symphonies from ArkivMusic yesterday.
It arrived today. :D
Anticipating full report! 8)
Corlyss
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue May 09, 2006 1:45 pm

^ All of 'em, eh? That box must weigh a ton!

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Post by miranda » Tue May 09, 2006 4:53 pm

Dietrich Buxtehude--Membra Jesu Nostri, on the Harmonia Mundi label, performed by the Cantus Colln. I haven't listened to this yet, other than a few audio samples--I'm curious as to how it will sound....

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Post by Ken » Fri May 19, 2006 10:55 am

Image

George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra: Brahms, Symphony 4 plus the Academic Festival and Tragic Overtures.

To be honest, I'm a touch disappointed with the recording of the third movement. It's far too leisurely... It's supposed to be a giocomo, darnit! Speed it up a and ring that bell a bit louder!
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

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Post by mourningstar » Fri May 19, 2006 11:00 am

Sarah Chang - Sweet Sorrow One heck of Solist :wink:
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hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Fri May 19, 2006 1:42 pm

Sarah Chang is performing in Malaysia on the 19th of June, too bad i don't have the bucks to spit out for that concert with the Oslo Philharmonic. She must be one of the supreme young soloists of our time.

mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Fri May 19, 2006 2:21 pm

Hautbois I know :shock: She was in The Netherlands 2 weeks ago. She was asked for the Violinconcert of Sibelius. I heard she's from the Julliard school. anyways she plays it so powerful. I was lucky enough to see it because they aired it on National Television 8) Not to mention that Sarah Chang is a very charming young lady :oops:
"Desertion for the artist means abandoning the concrete."

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Post by RebLem » Sat May 20, 2006 3:31 am

From Thurs, 11MAY 2006 through FRI, 19 MAY 2006, I listed to a few CDs. A few days, I listened to none, but here goes--

9/9 Beethoven: Sym 3--Jaap Schroeder, cond. Smithsonian Chamber Orch.--Smithsonian Collection of Recordings. The 2nd and 4th movements are particularly good here, but though it is a digital production, somehow it sounds a bit muffled at times. An original instruments production, this is part of a set of a 6 CD box consisting of the first 3 symphonies on 2 CDs, the Op. 18 early string quartets on 3 CDs, and 1 CD of the first two cello sonatas.

10/10 Mozart: The Magic Flute--Harnoncourt, cond. Chor & Mozartorchester des Opernhauses Zurich--2 CDs Warner Classics.

10/10 Shostakovich: Sym 8, National Sym |Sym 10, London Sym--Rostropovich, cond. @ Teldec

10/10 Schumann: Genoveva & Manfred Overtures |Overture, Scherzo, & Finale in E Major |Konzertstuck for 4 Horns and Orch in F Major--Konwitschny, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orch, rec 1960-1. Berlin Classics

10/10 Mahler: Syms 1-9 |Sym 10: Adagio--Emil Tabakov, Sofia Philharmonic with soloists and choruses in various works. This is a fine and impressive set of 15 CDs available very inexpensively from Berkshire Record Outlet. I didn't know what to expect; I thought I would hear ragged ensemble, but heard nothing of the sort. These are, for the most part, first class interpretations with superb sound. Unfortunately, some adjustment in sound levels is needed, as different symphonies seem to be recorded at different levels. The only dud here is the 8th--the conductor, orchestra, and choruses do a fine job, but some of the soloists, particularly bass Tamash Syule couldn't carry a Mahler tune in a U-Haul. Singing in the other works, however, is excellent. Particularly impressive is soprano Brigitte Pretschner in the 4th. The 9th also stands out as particularly affecting. These are, for the most part, MOR performances with no real eccentricities.--Capriccio.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
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Barry
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Post by Barry » Sat May 20, 2006 9:37 am

Stokowski Great Conductors of the Century set from EMI

One of the Kleiber/VPO two-disc sets on Memories; includes live performances of Brahms 4th and Beethoven's 7th

A live Jochum/Concertgebouw Bruckner 7th from the 80s on Bells of St. Florain

I also just ordered a few things from this site: http://www.musicinthemail.com/classical ... index.html

They include a live Stoki/Philly Scheherazade from one of his return visits in the early 60s, a Walter/Philly live Eroica from the late 40s, and a couple Giulini/CSO concerts from the 70s that include Bruckner's 8th and Schumann's 3rd.
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http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
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Post by Lark Ascending » Sat May 27, 2006 2:58 pm

Vaughan Williams - Choral & Vocal Collection, a 9 CD box set (also includes works by Bax, Butterworth, Elgar, Finzi, Gurney, Ireland and Warlock)

English Wind Music: Holst - Suites 1 & 2 for Military Band & Hammersmith and Vaughan Williams - English Folk Song Suite & Toccata Marziale
"Look here, I have given up my time, my work, my friends and my career to come here and learn from you, and I am not going to write a petit menuet dans le style de Mozart." - Ralph Vaughan Williams to Maurice Ravel

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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Sat May 27, 2006 5:02 pm

Lark Ascending wrote:Vaughan Williams - Choral & Vocal Collection, a 9 CD box set (also includes works by Bax, Butterworth, Elgar, Finzi, Gurney, Ireland and Warlock)
Hi Lark. Could you please post some more details about this set. Sounds intriguing.

Thanks! :wink:
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Lark Ascending
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Post by Lark Ascending » Mon May 29, 2006 2:46 pm

Mark,
It is a 9 CD box set released on EMI Classics.
Disc 1 - Toward the Unknown Region, Dona nobis pacem, Fantasia on the Old 104th Psalm Tune, Magnificat
Disc 2 - various VW orchestral works (Partia, Concerto Grosso, Tallis Fantasia, Romance & The Lark Ascending)
Disc 3 - Five Tudor Portraits, Benedicite, Five Variants of Dives & Lazarus
Disc 4 - Fantasia on Christmas Carols, Hodie
Disc 5 - Mass in G Minor & other sacred music by Finzi & Bax
Disc 6 - An Oxford Elegy, Whitsunday Hymn, Flos campi, Sancta Civitas
Disc 7 - On Wenlock Edge, Songs of Travel & songs by Elgar & Butterworth
Disc 8 - The House of Life, Songs of Travel
Disc 9 - Songs by Ireland, Gurney, Butterworth & Warlock.

I purchased my copy at HMV Oxford Circus branch whilst I was visiting London over the weekend as it's on special offer at £18.99 reduced from £40. I've listened to several of the CDs and particularly enjoyed the Songs of Travel which I'm listening to as I type.

Hope this helps
"Look here, I have given up my time, my work, my friends and my career to come here and learn from you, and I am not going to write a petit menuet dans le style de Mozart." - Ralph Vaughan Williams to Maurice Ravel

Mark Antony Owen
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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Mon May 29, 2006 3:04 pm

Lark Ascending wrote:Mark,
It is a 9 CD box set released on EMI Classics.
Disc 1 - Toward the Unknown Region, Dona nobis pacem, Fantasia on the Old 104th Psalm Tune, Magnificat
Disc 2 - various VW orchestral works (Partia, Concerto Grosso, Tallis Fantasia, Romance & The Lark Ascending)
Disc 3 - Five Tudor Portraits, Benedicite, Five Variants of Dives & Lazarus
Disc 4 - Fantasia on Christmas Carols, Hodie
Disc 5 - Mass in G Minor & other sacred music by Finzi & Bax
Disc 6 - An Oxford Elegy, Whitsunday Hymn, Flos campi, Sancta Civitas
Disc 7 - On Wenlock Edge, Songs of Travel & songs by Elgar & Butterworth
Disc 8 - The House of Life, Songs of Travel
Disc 9 - Songs by Ireland, Gurney, Butterworth & Warlock.

I purchased my copy at HMV Oxford Circus branch whilst I was visiting London over the weekend as it's on special offer at £18.99 reduced from £40. I've listened to several of the CDs and particularly enjoyed the Songs of Travel which I'm listening to as I type.

Hope this helps
Fabulous! Thanks, Lark!
"Neti, neti."

Formerly known as 'shadowritten'.

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Post by RebLem » Tue Jun 06, 2006 3:22 am

On 18 MAY, I emailed my first order to Castle Classics in Scotland. It just arrived yesterday, Monday 5 JUN 2006: the 12 CD Chandos set of the Mahler Symphonies conducted by Leif Segerstam (Castle appears to be one of the few sources that still has this available) and The Quarteto Casals CD of the 3 Arriaga SQs. It was 98.46 pounds, without VAT, of course, which, as it turned out, worked out to a charge of $185.40 on my credit card, plus a modest $1.85 foreign transaction fee finance charge.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

miranda
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Post by miranda » Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:42 am

Monteverdi--Vespers of 1610, performed by Martin Pearlman and the Boston Baroque--2-disc set, on the Telarc label.

Hildegard of Bingen, Voice of the Blood, performed by Sequentia, on the Deutsche Harmonia Mundi label.

Mark Antony Owen
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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Tue Jun 06, 2006 4:24 pm

RebLem wrote:On 18 MAY, I emailed my first order to Castle Classics in Scotland. It just arrived yesterday, Monday 5 JUN 2006: the 12 CD Chandos set of the Mahler Symphonies conducted by Leif Segerstam (Castle appears to be one of the few sources that still has this available) and The Quarteto Casals CD of the 3 Arriaga SQs. It was 98.46 pounds, without VAT, of course, which, as it turned out, worked out to a charge of $185.40 on my credit card, plus a modest $1.85 foreign transaction fee finance charge.
RebLem, I'm on good terms with Shaun, the Castle Classics' owner and MD. He's incredibly helpful, and I hope you had a great service from his business. I know stuff can take a while to arrive - it does here in the UK, too - but nothing's ever too much trouble with Shaun, and he'll always email you with a comprehensive answer if you pose a question.
"Neti, neti."

Formerly known as 'shadowritten'.

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