Are you a Cat or Dog person?

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Are you a Cat or Dog person?

I'm a Cat Person
4
40%
I'm a Dog Person
6
60%
 
Total votes: 10

living_stradivarius
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Are you a Cat or Dog person?

Post by living_stradivarius » Fri Aug 25, 2006 4:54 pm

Vote!
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mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Fri Aug 25, 2006 4:56 pm

Absolutley Cat person.,,.. i have this fobia for (big) dogs.
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Post by living_stradivarius » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:05 pm

I like dogs, but that doesn't mean I avoid cats :D
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paulb
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Post by paulb » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:05 pm

All my life I've loved any animal. But I'd have to say I'm more of cat fan. I adoted 3 and treat them like spoiled kids. They love me alot , especially since I started feeding them smoked organic turkey and canned tuna fish in water.
My old home of New Orleans was much more favored towards dogs. In fact many in new orleans hated cats. Here in Baton Rouge its about equal, but they really do love their cats.
I told a fellow katrina refuge that got a bit upset that my cat was loose from his cage inside the church shelter, "yeah you new orleanians did love your dogs and sure hated the cats" He snapped back, "yeah we can't stand the critters".
People do all kinds of malicious acts upon cats.

I love all animals but feel a better connection with cats.
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:16 pm

mourningstar wrote:Absolutley Cat person.,,.. i have this fobia for (big) dogs.
They don't have to be that big to be mean and even vicious. There is something called breeding (a form of genetic engineering that is very ancient) that basically makes most dogs extremely potentially dangerous, including small ones like my fahter's late Lhasa Apso, a breed that was bread specifically as an indoor watchdog.

I used to walk down the paths of Columbia, Maryland and encouncter women walking multiple dogs obviously designed simply to kill anyone whe looked sideways at their "mistress," which is exaclty what they would have done, had the stupid ugly bitch (and I don't mean the dog) who flattered herself that she might be raped not realized that she herself would have been put in prison if this had ever happened.

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Post by RebLem » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:20 pm

I am a dog person. Dogs are better than kids.

They don't raid the refrigerator, they have no use for $150 Nikes, and if you take them to the dog park, they don't get embarrassed if you hug them in front of their friends.
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Post by paulb » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:30 pm

RebLem wrote:I am a dog person. Dogs are better than kids.

.
When I was housed at the church shelter several kids were petting my cat and all of a sudden said, "we love animals more than people" :shock:
I mean what could I say. I believe one said "yeah animals are nicer" How could one argue that point?
One girl said she wants to be a vetanarian.
Psalm 118:22 The Stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing , it is marvelous in our sight.

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Post by BWV 1080 » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:05 pm

With 3 kids I have little use for animals.

Real children are so much more rewarding than projecting your parental instincts and emotional needs onto a dumb animal

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Post by living_stradivarius » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:18 pm

RebLem wrote:I am a dog person. Dogs are better than kids.

They don't raid the refrigerator, they have no use for $150 Nikes, and if you take them to the dog park, they don't get embarrassed if you hug them in front of their friends.
They may be embarrassed but can't do a thing about it ;)
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Post by Madame » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:40 pm

BWV 1080 wrote:With 3 kids I have little use for animals.

Real children are so much more rewarding than projecting your parental instincts and emotional needs onto a dumb animal
Too bad you feel that way ... you're cheating your kids out of something pretty wonderful.

And I know there is at least one person here (besides myself) who will go to the mat with you on whether animals are dumb.

But I do know people who think they ARE and treat them accordingly; best that they don't own them. They're likely to ignore their health and safety needs.

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Post by Madame » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:46 pm

RebLem wrote:I am a dog person. Dogs are better than kids.

They don't raid the refrigerator, they have no use for $150 Nikes, and if you take them to the dog park, they don't get embarrassed if you hug them in front of their friends.
Don't be too SURE about that, ha! Given the chance, my grand-dog could go through a pair of $150 Nikes in an afternoon, not to mention a stereo headset, and whatever other "chew toys" might be left lying around. :) After the headset incident my son asked whether there was a DV law against "puppy shaking".

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Post by Madame » Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:04 pm

Yikes! I have to choose?

I've had 2 great cats, sweet and loving personalities, low-maintenance, but when one was injured and had to stay indoors for a while, I did not like dealing with a litter box.

I've also known some great dogs, they were so responsive to people. My sister's little poodle would come up to me when I was sitting on the couch, just waiting for an invitation to hop up on my lap. Then I'd say "be my friend" and he'd lay his head against me and snuggle. Awww ... how can you not love such a dog.

On the other hand, I've known a couple of really neurotic dogs, both had "abandonment" issues from previous owners, and their neediness was too much. My other sis had a huge poodle she rescued from the shelter, and if she left him home alone he would panic and jump through the windows to get out and find people. Pretty expensive replacing windows and getting him stitched up at the vet.

Of course the most wonderful dog in the whole world is my grand-dog Pug who is certain that he is the center of the universe right now. He is a natural clown and cracks me up. But of course I don't have to deal with him 24/7 :)

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Post by DavidRoss » Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:18 pm

jbuck919 wrote:They don't have to be that big to be mean and even vicious. There is something called breeding (a form of genetic engineering that is very ancient) that basically makes most dogs extremely potentially dangerous, including small ones like my fahter's [sic] late Lhasa Apso, a breed that was bread [sic] specifically as an indoor watchdog.
Another astonishingly bigoted falsehood, viciously defamatory re. both dogs and breeders. Very few breeds have been developed for guard dog purposes; most have been bred either as working dogs (herding, hunting, etc.) or as companions, and temperament is as much a breed characteristic as conformation. Lhasa Apsos are an old Tibetan breed that is probably a product of natural selection rather than selective breeding. They are among the most popular companion dog in the U.S. today, though they are notoriously distrustful of outsiders.

I'm a dog person who loves my cat.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

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Post by BWV 1080 » Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:48 pm

Madame wrote:
BWV 1080 wrote:With 3 kids I have little use for animals.

Real children are so much more rewarding than projecting your parental instincts and emotional needs onto a dumb animal
Too bad you feel that way ... you're cheating your kids out of something pretty wonderful.

And I know there is at least one person here (besides myself) who will go to the mat with you on whether animals are dumb.

But I do know people who think they ARE and treat them accordingly; best that they don't own them. They're likely to ignore their health and safety needs.
I have had both dogs and cats and have come to the conclusion that they are just opportunistic parasites who have evolved a certain mimicry of human affection that enables them to obtain a steady food supply.

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Post by RebLem » Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:29 pm

BWV 1080 wrote: I have had both dogs and cats and have come to the conclusion that they are just opportunistic parasites who have evolved a certain mimicry of human affection that enables them to obtain a steady food supply.
Harumph, harumph!! Bah, Humbug!!
And a happy Labor Day to you, too! :D
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:33 pm

DavidRoss wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:They don't have to be that big to be mean and even vicious. There is something called breeding (a form of genetic engineering that is very ancient) that basically makes most dogs extremely potentially dangerous, including small ones like my fahter's [sic] late Lhasa Apso, a breed that was bread [sic] specifically as an indoor watchdog.
Another astonishingly bigoted falsehood, viciously defamatory re. both dogs and breeders. Very few breeds have been developed for guard dog purposes; most have been bred either as working dogs (herding, hunting, etc.) or as companions, and temperament is as much a breed characteristic as conformation. Lhasa Apsos are an old Tibetan breed that is probably a product of natural selection rather than selective breeding. They are among the most popular companion dog in the U.S. today, though they are notoriously distrustful of outsiders.

I'm a dog person who loves my cat.
I like your repeated use of "sic" in this context.

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Post by Madame » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:00 am

BWV 1080 wrote:
I have had both dogs and cats and have come to the conclusion that they are just opportunistic parasites who have evolved a certain mimicry of human affection that enables them to obtain a steady food supply.
I don't think it's limited to dogs and cats ... there's a good-sized bunch of people who operate that way :) :)

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Post by Ralph » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:21 am

I've always loved dogs, German shephereds in particular. It's impossible for me to have a dog now. :( I do have two terrific cats. They're great but they are not dogs.
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Post by Teresa B » Sat Aug 26, 2006 7:40 am

BWV 1080 wrote: [I have had both dogs and cats and have come to the conclusion that they are just opportunistic parasites who have evolved a certain mimicry of human affection that enables them to obtain a steady food supply.
No way. My toy poodle has skipped the mimicry thing and trained the household humans to follow her as pack leader.

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Aug 26, 2006 9:12 am

I'd just like to make it clear that while I am dog-wary (not phobic), I understand that they make valuable companions for huge numbers of people. I've had too many encounters while walking or jogging with dogs allowed to run loose in Stony Creek not to assume the worst until proven otherwise. Not to mention that there and in other places I've lived dogs barking can be a serious problem. Not so far in Germany, though. The worst thing I saw here was two dogs who were properly leashed get into a spontaneous dominance fight next to an outdoor cafe where there were children young enough to be frightened.

At least I don't live in France and have to deal with Fifi eating off mommy's plate at the next table.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
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Post by RebLem » Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:54 am

jbuck919 wrote:I'd just like to make it clear that while I am dog-wary (not phobic), I understand that they make valuable companions for huge numbers of people. I've had too many encounters while walking or jogging with dogs allowed to run loose in Stony Creek not to assume the worst until proven otherwise. Not to mention that there and in other places I've lived dogs barking can be a serious problem. Not so far in Germany, though. The worst thing I saw here was two dogs who were properly leashed get into a spontaneous dominance fight next to an outdoor cafe where there were children young enough to be frightened.

At least I don't live in France and have to deal with Fifi eating off mommy's plate at the next table.
Are you sure the dogs in Stony Creek weren't just excited by the flashing lights on the heels of your running shoes? :P
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Post by Susan L » Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:55 am

Some of you may remember my tribute/birthday wishes re Beethoven a couple years ago. I haven’t really posted since because... Having had many cats and dogs (and the occasional fish and lizard), a few years ago I decided to take the plunge and move fully from pet owner to capital “D” Dog capital “P” Person. I specialize in Cairn Terriers (ala Toto from the Wizard of Oz, or “dirty Westies” - West Highland White Terries being all white, while similar-looking Cairns are any color but white), showing in conformation (the “beauty” contest, how closely the dog conforms to the idealized “Standard” of what the breed should look like), and training for performance competition (obedience, agility, etc.). I’ve also been involved with breed rescue.

Canine behavior is very much a combination of nature and nurture. Certain behaviors, or drives, are genetically predisposed, and purebred lines were intentionally developed to reinforce those characteristics. Re guard and herding dogs: Some breeds have exceptionally strong pack instincts. (Appropriately) Raising those pups with humans or livestock - the dog comes to view those creatures as its pack, and is particularly protective of its pack. Other breeds - herding dogs, sight hounds - are innately attracted to movement, a drive which can be channeled and is useful for managing livestock, or hunting.

Much like human infants, puppies have a window of opportunity - approximately the first 16 weeks - which are critical for social development. Successfully managing the stages of outgoingness and fearfulness they go through at that age significantly impacts their level of socialization, and the temperament of the adult dog. Not to say, if you miss that window, all is lost - but you’re bound to spend lots of time, and money on professional trainers, rectifying the situation. IMO - and I have to admit, I used to be one of those people who smirked at the idea - if you take a dog to only one training class, do puppy preschool. Having a dog heel in proper position or shake hands on command is icing on the cake; having a well-socialized dog that knows how to deal with stress is a dog you can live with, that doesn’t show inappropriate aggression as a way of dealing with stress, fear, novel situations. Pet, working dog, show dog - it’s still an animal, and first and foremost, you need to be safe, as do those who may come in contact with your dog.

Much, if not most, of “bad” dog behavior is actually poor people choices. We tend to over anthropomorphize our pets, and unwittingly train the animal to behave poorly. The doorbell rings; Bowser runs to the door, barking; you pat him on the head, “good boy! good boy!” You just reinforced the dog to be aggressive with strangers. It’s an animal. As loveable as he is, he’s got a little peanut brain. He’s not going to be very good at differentiating between a burglar or mugger and Aunt Lillian who you haven’t seen in 15 years. While cats have an extensive vocal language by which they communicate, canines primarily communicate via ritualized body language. (Most of us are cautious-to-fearful of a barking dog with ears back. Confusing signals because you also need to evaluate the tail, lips, stance, etc. and how they relate to one another to determine whether or not that’s an aggression display. You see a dog that is stock still, rigid as a granite statue, intently focused on you/someone else - YOU ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER, that dog is in attack mode.) We - obviously - have primate body language. A common situation where you’re prone to be bitten: walk right up to a dog to go pet him. People approach one another head-on (it’s that primate visual thing); to a dog, that’s aggressive body language. Unless they mean to fight, dogs approach one another in a slight arc. (A well socialized/trained dog will be able to deal with that stress, and may well flash you a few, I mean you no harm, body signals to diffuse the, what is to the dog, confrontation.) (And the next time you go to pet someone’s dog, turn your body at a slight angle - the dog should be able to correctly read your good intent.) We primates throw our arms around others, and our dogs, and hug them. To display hierarchy within the pack, the more dominant dog will place its chin/head on, or throw its forelegs over, the shoulders of a lesser ranking dog. Nothing wrong with hugging our dogs, but when we do, we display our dominance within the family pack. If we’re not consistently dominant in other areas, it confuses the dog, and a dog confused about its position within the hierarchy tends to react inconsistently, sometimes dangerously. (Dominance is not aggression; it’s, who’s calling the shots, who’s lead do we follow. For a pack animal, someone MUST be the leader. Not out of aggression, or spitefulness or whatever, but if, in the dog’s viewpoint, there’s no clear “top dog” in your pack, your dog’s hard wired for it - he MUST step up to the plate, because in a pack, one individual MUST be the leader.)

Susan L
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Post by Ralph » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:08 pm

Hi Susan,

Welcome back! A very informative post.
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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:10 pm

Thank you, Susan, that was most informative (meant seriously as an appreciation of your taking the time to write such a lengthy post).

It does, however, sound to me like a lot more trouble than it is worth. No dogs at all or dogs that require a more elaborate training manual than children? That's a no-brainer to me.

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Post by Susan L » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:32 pm

Well, with reality shows like Super Nanny and Nanny 911, doesn't sound like too much reading of training manuals is going on in some quarters...

Kids, canines - In a nutshell, the name of the game is, consistency. Not only be aware of you actions, but take note of the reactions you get. Sounds so simple, but in practice often takes a focused effort. And the plain and simple fact is, dog owners are responsible for making sure their pets appropriately function in our world. A dog is a living creature, that thinks (albeit not the way we do), that's going to be around for many years. Helpful if you have an idea of what you're getting yourself into.

Susan L
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Post by Ralph » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:55 pm

jbuck919 wrote:Thank you, Susan, that was most informative (meant seriously as an appreciation of your taking the time to write such a lengthy post).

It does, however, sound to me like a lot more trouble than it is worth. No dogs at all or dogs that require a more elaborate training manual than children? That's a no-brainer to me.
*****

Kids and canines both benefit from a common sense approach. Americans love manuals be it for childraising or sex. Dogs are social animals hardwired to follow the pack leader. That's gotta be the owner. It doesn't take much study - one good book for a novice owner will do - to train most dogs. Of course a professional trainer may be necessary for certain breeds or if particular skills need to be inculcated.

Cats are another matter.
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Post by DavidRoss » Sat Aug 26, 2006 1:17 pm

jbuck919 wrote:I like your repeated use of "sic" in this context.
Thank you. I'm pleasantly surprised that you display a sense of humor in this context, and that you seem amenable to Susan's correction.

Based on my limited experience with dogs and children, the former are much easier to train and the process is far quicker.

I wonder if anyone's done a study of the relationship between responsible pet ownership (which in the case of dogs certainly includes basic obedience training) and responsible parenting...?

And, Susan, I really respect anyone who has the patience to succeed with terriers in obedience and agility trials. :D
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

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"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Aug 26, 2006 3:18 pm

I'm really a dog person. I have had both, have had only one, and now I have both again. I'm very allergic to both. I like cats, but they ain't dogs. One day I'll tell you about the surprise my mother got me when she thought I was too stressed out with work and law school.
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Post by Ralph » Sat Aug 26, 2006 4:19 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:I'm really a dog person. I have had both, have had only one, and now I have both again. I'm very allergic to both. I like cats, but they ain't dogs. One day I'll tell you about the surprise my mother got me when she thought I was too stressed out with work and law school.
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Law schools stressed you? Egads!
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Post by mourningstar » Sat Aug 26, 2006 5:02 pm

My cats are already walking around my living room. really proud and all. they are clean. and do not pee somewhere else except the place they are suppose to

at this very moment, they are on my left and my right.

does anyone of you people learned cats tricks? i saw on youtube.com the strangest tricks that cats were doing.
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Post by living_stradivarius » Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:22 pm

Ralph wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:I'm really a dog person. I have had both, have had only one, and now I have both again. I'm very allergic to both. I like cats, but they ain't dogs. One day I'll tell you about the surprise my mother got me when she thought I was too stressed out with work and law school.
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Law schools stressed you? Egads!
Isn't that normal? :) Unless you meant that.
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Post by anasazi » Sun Aug 27, 2006 12:59 am

Can't choose. I have had both for pets (or actually, they have had me).

Only one dog. She loved to catch frisbees (her idea). Dogs are a lot different now than when I was a kid. What ever became of beagles, poodles and terriers?

At the moment, a cat is in charge here (Boo). He likes to try and beat me to my favorite couch for our afternoon siesta. It is difficult to move him once he is situated however, he weighs in at 20 pounds.
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Post by Ralph » Sun Aug 27, 2006 7:44 am

anasazi wrote:Can't choose. I have had both for pets (or actually, they have had me).

Only one dog. She loved to catch frisbees (her idea). Dogs are a lot different now than when I was a kid. What ever became of beagles, poodles and terriers?

At the moment, a cat is in charge here (Boo). He likes to try and beat me to my favorite couch for our afternoon siesta. It is difficult to move him once he is situated however, he weighs in at 20 pounds.
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Post by Wallingford » Sun Aug 27, 2006 3:41 pm

Cats are smarter than dogs. Cats don't obnoxiously yap at you when you pass them by while they're in a locked car.
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Post by jbuck919 » Sun Aug 27, 2006 3:52 pm

Wallingford wrote:Cats are smarter than dogs. Cats don't obnoxiously yap at you when you pass them by while they're in a locked car.
No, but cats will escape from a car while you're taking them to the vet and require hours to retrieve.

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Post by Wallingford » Mon Aug 28, 2006 5:06 pm

But no matter what else he wrote, the late Cleveland Amory redeemed himself with a question he answered in his longtime syndicated column, "Animail." A reader asked, "Which cat do you consider the most beautiful?" Amory replied, "Yours."
Last edited by Wallingford on Tue Aug 29, 2006 4:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:30 pm

jbuck919 wrote:No, but cats will escape from a car while you're taking them to the vet and require hours to retrieve.
:lol: :lol:

I have found a handy little device to prevent that - I mean besides the portable cage. When I drove from DC to Utah, it took me 4 days. The entire trip I had every stinkin' one of my cats in a dog halter. That slows 'em down like you wouldn't believe. They scrape themselves on the ground trying to get it off. They contort themselves like pretzels to try to slip out of it. All that obsessing over the halter prevents them from bolting anywhere.
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Post by Ralph » Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:32 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Wallingford wrote:Cats are smarter than dogs. Cats don't obnoxiously yap at you when you pass them by while they're in a locked car.
No, but cats will escape from a car while you're taking them to the vet and require hours to retrieve.
*****

Not from cars with a trunk!
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"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:34 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:No, but cats will escape from a car while you're taking them to the vet and require hours to retrieve.
:lol: :lol:

I have found a handy little device to prevent that - I mean besides the portable cage. When I drove from DC to Utah, it took me 4 days. The entire trip I had every stinkin' one of my cats in a dog halter. That slows 'em down like you wouldn't believe. They scrape themselves on the ground trying to get it off. They contort themselves like pretzels to try to slip out of it. All that obsessing over the halter prevents them from bolting anywhere.
*****

You been reading B&D mags? :)
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"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:43 pm

Ralph wrote:You been reading B&D mags? :)
?
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Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Cosima__J

Post by Cosima__J » Thu Aug 31, 2006 10:03 pm

Someone asked, what happened to all the beagles. Well we have three of them --- Daisy, Dolly and Ty. Beagles are so good natured and affectionate. Two of them were adopted from the pound.

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