Inventor of instant noodles dies at 96

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Haydnseek
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Inventor of instant noodles dies at 96

Post by Haydnseek » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:33 pm

I've been enjoying this man's invention for years.

Inventor of instant noodles dies at 96

Sat Jan 6, 6:02 AM ET

Momofuku Ando, the Japanese inventor of instant noodles — a dish that has sustained American college students for decades — has died. He was 96.

Nissin Food Products Co., the company Ando founded, said on its Web site that he died Friday after suffering a heart attack.

Born in Taiwan, Ando founded his company in 1948 from a humble family operation. Faced with food shortages in post-World War II Japan, Ando thought a quality, convenient noodle product would help feed the masses.

In 1958, his "Chicken Ramen" — the first instant noodle — was introduced after many trials. Following its success, the company added other products, such as the "Cup Noodle" in 1971.

"The Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum" opened in 1999 in Ikeda City in western Japan commemorating his inventions.

Ando gave a speech at the company's New Year ceremony and enjoyed Chicken Ramen for lunch with Nissin employees on Thursday before falling ill, Japan's largest daily Yomiuri reported.

He is survived by his wife, Masako.

Copyright © 2007 The Associated Press.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:37 pm

The report makes no mention of whether the inventor's invention played any role in his demise. I have been given to understand that there is 0 nutritional value in ramen noodles.

Instant noodle inventor Ando dies at 96

Saturday, January 6, 2007 at 07:21 EST
OSAKA — Momofuku Ando, the founder-chairman of Nissin Food Products Co, died of a heart failure on Friday evening at a hospital in Ikeda, Osaka Prefecture, his family said. He was 96.

Ando was widely known as the inventor of instant noodles.

Born on March 5, 1910 in Taiwan, Ando initially ran clothing companies in Taipei and Osaka while he was a student at Ritsumeikan University. In 1948, he founded the precursor of Nissin, before introducing "Chicken Ramen," the world's first instant noodle product, in 1958.

Ando was inspired to develop the instant noodle after coming upon a long line of people on a cold night shortly after World War II waiting to buy freshly made ramen at a black market food stall, according to Nissin. The experience convinced him that "Peace will come to the world when the people have enough to eat," it said.

In 1971, Nissin introduced the Cup Noodle, instant noodles in a waterproof styrofoam container that could be used to cook the noodles, ahead of his competitors.

Dubbed the "Ramen King," Ando is credited with expanding Nissin into the No. 1 company in the industry and was well-known for his dedication to his job.

Kei Kizugawa, head of the "Kamigata Geino" journal, said Ando was a great food product inventor whose accomplishment equals that of Konosuke Matsushita, the founder of Matsushita Electric Industrial Co who was dubbed in Japan as the "Father of Consumer Electronics."

"I believe generation after generation will talk about Chicken Ramen. I don't think there will ever be an instant noodle product that beats the taste of Chicken Ramen," Kizugawa said.

Ando became a chairman after handing over the presidency in 1981 to his eldest son, but came to double as the president again two years later after having a conflict over the company's policy, including development of new products.

In 1999, Ando opened the Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum in Ikeda after posting his second son, Koki, as the president.

Ando retired from chairman's post in June 2005 to serve as founder-chairman.

In July 2005, Nissin introduced a vacuum packed instant noodle specially designed for Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi to eat during the U.S. space shuttle Discovery's mission.

Showcasing his "Space Ram" noodles in front of reporters, Ando said, "I'm happy I've realized my dream that noodles can go into space." (Kyodo News)
http://www.japantoday.com/jp/news/395279
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jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:44 pm

Considering how long he lived, evidently he did not eat his own product.

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Post by Ralph » Sat Jan 06, 2007 10:17 pm

I like ramen and keep it in the office for an occasional cold weather snack. Goes great with Diet Coke.
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Ted

Post by Ted » Sun Jan 07, 2007 12:09 am

John Wrote:
Considering how long he lived, evidently he did not eat his own product.
He may not have eaten it, but he certainly used his noodle

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Post by living_stradivarius » Sun Jan 07, 2007 1:27 am

His invention saved many a college student :D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Sun Jan 07, 2007 2:41 am

Ted wrote:John Wrote:
Considering how long he lived, evidently he did not eat his own product.
He may not have eaten it, but he certainly used his noodle
Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
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jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:19 am

Ralph wrote:I like ramen and keep it in the office for an occasional cold weather snack. Goes great with Diet Coke.
Which makes sense, since they have about the same nutritional value. :)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Wallingford » Sun Jan 07, 2007 4:01 pm

He was a god. (And I'm writing this on a Sunday, too.)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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Post by jbuck919 » Sun Jan 07, 2007 4:12 pm

Wallingford wrote:He was a god. (And I'm writing this on a Sunday, too.)
Appropriate, since his noodles are the salt of the earth.

Not to be unfair to the dead, I am reminded of the time not too long ago when Campbell's soup cans carried the message "If you would like to know about the nutritional content of a Campbell's soup, write us." If you got back nothing, you got an appropriate response.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Tue Jan 09, 2007 8:31 pm

From The New York Times (an editorial perhaps even Corlyss can enjoy):

January 9, 2007
Appreciations
Mr. Noodle

The news last Friday of the death of the ramen noodle guy surprised those of us who had never suspected that there was such an individual. It was easy to assume that instant noodle soup was a team invention, one of those depersonalized corporate miracles, like the Honda Civic, the Sony Walkman and Hello Kitty, that sprang from that ingenious consumer-product collective known as postwar Japan.

But no. Momofuku Ando, who died in Ikeda, near Osaka, at 96, was looking for cheap, decent food for the working class when he invented ramen noodles all by himself in 1958. His product — fried, dried and sold in little plastic-wrapped bricks or foam cups — turned the company he founded, Nissin Foods, into a global giant. According to the company’s Web site, instant ramen satisfies more than 100 million people a day. Aggregate servings of the company’s signature brand, Cup Noodles, reached 25 billion worldwide in 2006.

There are other versions of fast noodles. There is spaghetti in a can. It is sweetish and gloppy and a first cousin of dog food. Macaroni and cheese in a box is a convenience product requiring several inconvenient steps. You have to boil the macaroni, stir it to prevent sticking and determine through some previously obtained expertise when it is “done.” You must separate water from noodles using a specialized tool, a colander, and to complete the dish — such an insult — you have to measure and add the fatty deliciousness yourself, in the form of butter and milk that Kraft assumes you already have on hand. All that effort, plus the cleanup, is hardly worth it.

Ramen noodles, by contrast, are a dish of effortless purity. Like the egg, or tea, they attain a state of grace through a marriage with nothing but hot water. After three minutes in a yellow bath, the noodles soften. The pebbly peas and carrot chips turn practically lifelike. A near-weightless assemblage of plastic and foam is transformed into something any college student will recognize as food, for as little as 20 cents a serving.

There are some imperfections. The fragile cellophane around the ramen brick tends to open in a rush, spilling broken noodle bits around. The silver seasoning packet does not always tear open evenly, and bits of sodium essence can be trapped in the foil hollows, leaving you always to wonder whether the broth, rich and salty as it is, is as rich and salty as it could have been. The aggressively kinked noodles form an aesthetically pleasing nest in cup or bowl, but when slurped, their sharp bends spray droplets of broth that settle uncomfortably about the lips and leave dots on your computer screen.

But those are minor quibbles. Ramen noodles have earned Mr. Ando an eternal place in the pantheon of human progress. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Give him ramen noodles, and you don’t have to teach him anything.

LAWRENCE DOWNES
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Post by burnitdown » Tue Jan 09, 2007 9:31 pm

Think about 100 million styrofoam cups a day hitting the landfills, where they'll fester for one hundred generations. Smart.

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