So what music do you guys like besides classical?

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MegaKitsune
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So what music do you guys like besides classical?

Post by MegaKitsune » Mon Jan 22, 2007 6:58 pm

Just like the title says. Include genres, any subgenres you like, and artists! Also any music you hate? Tell me!

OK, so for me:

Techno: Lots of acid, hardcore, happy harcdore and especially DnB (Drum and bass) and anything else that has breakbeats. I like The Crystal Method, Pendulum, Aphex Twin's earlier stuff, The Prodigy, Nakatomi, Atari Teenage Riot, AK12000, DJ Dara and The Future Sound Of London.

Rock: I like industrial stuff (especially German) and 80's and early 90's rock. Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson, Nirvana, Van Halen, Die Krupps, Rammstein, Helmet, Eisbrecher and The Bloodhound Gang. Pink Floyd is good too.

Rap: I DESPISE MODERN RAP. I like 80's - early 90's rap. Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, NWA, Run DMC, Kid Frost, Easy E, and Coolio.

Jazz: I'm not real familiar with the artists in here, but I like both funky swingin' jazz and the smooth contemporary stuff. The only artist that comes to me right now is The Thril and the band that did the music for Sonic Adventure 2. Speaking of which...

Video Game Music: Any music in a game that is of the above genres I'm going to like. I like RPG music and FPS music especially. Alexander Brandon, skaven, Richard Jaques, Nobuo Uematsu, Koji Kondo, Mark Knight, Tommy Tallarico, Hiroshi Miyauchi, Jun Sunoe, the Wavemaster crew, Fumie Kumatani, Naofumi Hataya, and Tomoko Sasaki.

Music I HATE: Country western (I don't hate it, I DESPISE IT), modern rap (Lil' Jon and crunk stuff specifically), emo, and modern rock.
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Post by Brendan » Mon Jan 22, 2007 7:13 pm

Besides classical, mostly punk rock (nostalgia for my mis-spent youth or something) along the lines of The Birthday Party, Einsturzende Neubauten, Siouxsie and the Banshees etc.

As I age, I find some of the pop I hated back then quite pleasant today. I even find myself listening to Country music ( :shock: ), as that seems to be where all the guitar-picking and melody in Pop has moved. Doesn't sound much like the Country music I hated as a youth, either. But I have never warmed to Rap, even though it was around when I was still in school (yes, it's been around that long!).

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Post by piston » Mon Jan 22, 2007 7:14 pm

You certainly have strong feelings against country music. :) That's what my wife prefers and I get to listen to quite a bit of it when we travel in our car. I won't try to convince you about some of its virtues. However, I do think that the diversity within that genre is no less wide-ranging than within rock 'n roll, where you like some and don't like other styles. In some country songs, one wonders for example what's the difference with soft rock. It's also a genre which, notwithstanding a number of "macho" male singers, has proven to be quite a platform for female singers and musicians. In any case, I can only listen to non-classical music for so long, but when given the opportunity I listen to classical all day. :lol:
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Post by Ralph » Mon Jan 22, 2007 8:53 pm

I like some jazz, Dixieland, classic show tunes, popular songs from the fifties and earlier, military band music, ragas, folk songs.
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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Jan 22, 2007 9:22 pm

Pretty much what Ralph said, though I am not at all familiar with ragas.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
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Post by Klazzt » Mon Jan 22, 2007 10:03 pm

Heh. I strongly dislike rap, pop, and country music. Most people find the later to be strange of me, as I live in the homeland of country music. I listen to most of the stuff that people here dislike.

I love heavy metal, black metal, and power metal, industrial, some songs from anime, and almost anything that comes out of a video game. My prefered bands are Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Sonata Arctica, Rhapsody of Fire, Luca Turilli, Rob Zombie, Rammstein, Flesh Field, and Blackmore's Night. Blackmore's Night is a bit off, being folk, but it's the only folk band I've heard that I like.

I only listen to music that feels powerful and isn't too soft. If music is too soft, I tend to get bored or a bit sad. :x

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:56 am

I like most genres except traditional country music and rock after 1979.
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Post by anasazi » Tue Jan 23, 2007 3:11 am

Lots of it but not everything. I listen to popular, some rock but mostly the Sinatra type pop, some folk, especially bluegrass, and a number of movie soundtracks, but less of them nowdays. I guess instrumental music has always prevailed for me over vocals and especially the sound of a modern orchestra. I like jazz, but not so modern that my ears can't pick out the chord changes.

Don't care much for country, rap or metal or punk.
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Post by lmpower » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:48 pm

I like Edith Piaf, Armando Manzanero, Joan Baez, Odetta, Ravi Shankar, Scott Joplin, Jerome Kern etc. I am not a country and western fan, but there are some gems in that repertoire. Hank Williams Sr. singing "A Fool Such as I" is an example of a sincere expression in that genre.

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Post by Don Satz » Tue Jan 23, 2007 3:18 pm

I enjoy listening to most types of music, but classical is the only category I would spend my income on (except for musical gifts for my wife).
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Post by burnitdown » Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:09 pm

Find pop, rock, jazz and hip-hop to be tedious; like quality underground metal and electronic music. No opinion on country.

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Post by RebLem » Wed Jan 24, 2007 2:16 am

lmpower wrote:I like Edith Piaf, Armando Manzanero, Joan Baez, Odetta, Ravi Shankar, Scott Joplin, Jerome Kern etc. I am not a country and western fan, but there are some gems in that repertoire. Hank Williams Sr. singing "A Fool Such as I" is an example of a sincere expression in that genre.
I consider Scott Joplin to be a classical composer, and I love him, too. I like blues, esp. Bessie Smith and, even more, Tampa Red, partly because I knew him personally. He recorded more 78 sides than any other blues artist; his output extends to 15 CDs, Bessie Smith's to only 10. I knew him for the first two years of the last four years of his life, when he was a resident of the Sacred Heart Nursing Home at 1550 S Albany on the West Side of Chicago recieiving medicaid, and I was his public aid caseworker. I am not revealing anything confidential here; the fact that he was receiving public assistance has been published in magazine articles about him, and in liner notes on his recordings. His strongest work is from the mid and late 1930's; his music from that period is not really just blues, but a fusion of jazz and blues.

Then there's Billie Holliday. I have told my family that I want them to play her recording of "Please don't talk about me when I'm gone" at my funeral. I have a 9 CD set of her early work on Columbia and that other 9 CD Verve set of her later work, and I listen to it often. I also like other jazz artists as varied as Louis Armstrong, Thelonius Monk, and that famous Cannonball Adderley/Nancy Wilson album.

When it comes to rock my interest ends with the Beatles. Not interested in anybody after that except the Mamas and the Papas and the Beach Boys, if you want to call that rock. I am especially interested in early rock--Elvis Presley (his best song, to me, is his first one, "That's all right"), Buddy Holly, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Roy Orbison.

I like folk music too. In my opinion, the greatest song of the last 50 years in any genre was Steve Goodman's magnificent "City of New Orleans." But I am, in particular, a fan of folk music of the American labor movement, esp Utah Phillips.

I am very selective about country music, but I do have and enjoy the 10 CD set of the complete Hank Williams, Sr., and I also like Patty Loveless a lot. I got interested in her when she sang a song on the Letterman show that just bowled me over, a labor type song called "You'll never leave Harlan alive." I went to Amazon within a few days and bought about 7 of her albums, and she is now a favorite.

I also like a lot of standards and show tunes, and I hate rap and hip hop of all sorts.
Last edited by RebLem on Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by dulcinea » Wed Jan 24, 2007 1:14 pm

:cry: Having had a very unhappy sentimental life, I am very moved by love songs. Some are cheerful, like FLY ME TO THE MOON and LOVERS CONCERTO, but the ones that touch me the most are poignant stuff like KILLING ME SOFTLY and WE'RE ALL ALONE. I also rate movie music highly. Some of my most pleasant musical moments involve movies such as THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN; when I first heard the very rousing theme music of Elmer Bernstein, I knew I was going to enjoy a very exciting adventure, and I was not disappointed.
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Post by dulcinea » Wed Jan 24, 2007 2:13 pm

:? RebLem, does your TR quotation refer to Roosevelt's revolt against Taft, which resulted in the GOP losing the Presidency? Are you wishing that 1912 might repeat itself?
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Jan 24, 2007 4:49 pm

Actually, for a more comprehensive look at what many of us old posters (including myself) prefer in the way of non-classical, check out thus thread:
http://classicalmusicguide.com/phpBB2/v ... hp?t=11905
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Post by Nashvillebill » Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:37 pm

Ok.... I'm stepping out on a limb here and saying that I like Country!! well not all of it and I more so love the songs them selves vs. the people singing them. I love the songwriters of country music as it's some of the most moving and enjoyable lyrics if you really listen. if you dissagree listen to Radney Foster, Bruce Robison, Darrely Scott and others like them and try and tell me those are some great writers. Also guys like Cash, Willie nelson, Hank Sr. and Dolly should be in everyone collection regardless if you like country or not. They are icons.
am very selective about country music, but I do have and enjoy the 10 CD set of the complete Hank williams, Sr., and I also like Patty Loveless a lot. I got interested in her when she sang a song on the Letterman show that just bowled me over, a labor type song called "You'll never leave Harlan alive." I went to Amazon within a few days and bought about 7 of her albums, and she is now a favorite.
"You'll never leave harlan alive" is probably one of the most haunting songs I have ever heard as well. My wife's grandfather worked in the coal mines in WVA when he was young but got out to join the army which pretty much saved his life from that.

But I also love every type of music as long as it's good and creative and can speak to you.

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Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:56 pm

Like a little of everything - Rock, Jazz, Country, Bluegrass, Hip Hop, Funk, etc.

My general favorite genres these days are:

Late 60's / early 70's fusion (Miles, early Weather Report, Mahavishnu, Headhunters etc.)

Recent Pomo multistylistic weirdness - John Zorn, Mike Patton (Mr. Bungle, Fantomas), Bill Frisell etc

West African music (Fela, King Sunny Ade, Konono no. 1, Pygmy music, Ali Farka Toure, etc)

The underground / hardcore edge of hip hop and heavy metal (Dalek, Meshuggah, Godflesh, Napalm Death, Sepultura, Cannibal Ox)

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Post by lmpower » Thu Jan 25, 2007 12:57 pm

I consider Scott Joplin to be a classical composer

People like Scott Joplin, John Phillip Sousa and Johann Strauss can be considered to be on the borderline with classical allright. Publisher Stark said that Joplin's music had the precision of a Bach fugue and the delicacy of a Chopin nocturne. That was a fitting tribute.

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Post by Dennis Spath » Fri Jan 26, 2007 3:02 pm

My favorite non-classical genre is the Dixieland Jazz and variations popularized on radio in the 1930's and into the 1940's by the likes of Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarten, and groups like Woody Herman, Bennie Goodman, Red Nichols and the Five Pennies, etc., which so influenced the Big Band era. Other favorites of mine were the "Modern Jazz Quartet", which was very classical IMO, Duke Ellington, Dave Brubeck, and Miles Davis. Living in Chicago I was blessed to have seen and heard Armstrong, Teagarten, Brubeck, and Davis live.
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Jan 26, 2007 3:22 pm

lmpower wrote:I consider Scott Joplin to be a classical composer

People like Scott Joplin, John Phillip Sousa and Johann Strauss can be considered to be on the borderline with classical allright. Publisher Stark said that Joplin's music had the precision of a Bach fugue and the delicacy of a Chopin nocturne. That was a fitting tribute.
I might not go that far, for one reason because the concept of "precision" has little meaning in music let alone a Bach fugue, but with the general spirit of your post I can hardly disagree.

When I was in college taking these music theory courses, we were occasionally required to produce a composition. The professors, even at that level, evidently thought this was the way to make their students like them by bringing out their creative side, a fairly foolish American pedagogical conceit that carries over from high school, but I always resented it for I knew I had no talent at all and was pretty sure my classmates had almost none. (If they could compose, they would not be majoring in music at a liberal arts college.) Every time it happened, half the class wrote a ragtime piece, and the other half wrote a waltz. Except for me. I always wrote an atonal piece in the hope of covering up my complete lack of talent. :)

There's also the phenomenon of the borderline borderline. I was reflecting not long ago when Paul McCartney turned 64 that "Will You Still Need Me, Will You Still Feed Me" is a cross between honky-tonk and Cole Porter. This is not going to make me into a general rock/pop fan, but there it is.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Madame » Sat Jan 27, 2007 10:01 am

RebLem wrote:
I consider Scott Joplin to be a classical composer, and I love him, too. I like blues, esp. Bessie Smith and, even more, Tampa Red, partly because I knew him personally. He recorded more 78 sides than any other blues artist; his output extends to 15 CDs, Bessie Smith's to only 10.

Then there's Billie Holliday. I have told my family that I want them to play her recording of "Please don't talk about me when I'm gone" at my funeral. I have a 9 CD set of her early work on Columbia and that other 9 CD Verve set of her later work, and I listen to it often. I also like other jazz artists as varied as Louis Armstrong, Thelonius Monk, and that famous Cannonball Adderley/Nancy Wilson album.

When it comes to rock my interest ends with the Beatles. Not interested in anybody after that except the Mamas and the Papas and the Beach Boys, if you want to call that rock. I am especially interested in early rock--Elvis Presley (his best song, to me, is his first one, "That's all right"), Buddy Holly, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Roy Orbison.

I like folk music too. In my opinion, the greatest song of the last 50 years in any genre was Steve Goodman's magnificent "City of New Orleans." But I am, in particular, a fan of folk music of the American labor movement, esp Utah Phillips.

I am very selective about country music, but I do have and enjoy the 10 CD set of the complete Hank Williams, Sr., and I also like Patty Loveless a lot. I got interested in her when she sang a song on the Letterman show that just bowled me over, a labor type song called "You'll never leave Harlan alive." I went to Amazon within a few days and bought about 7 of her albums, and she is now a favorite.

I also like a lot of standards and show tunes, and I hate rap and hip hop of all sorts.
Were we separated at birth or something? :)

I'm a big Steve Goodman fan and always wonder how/when others hooked into his work -- ah, I see you lived near Wrigley Field, THAT explains so much!

I like classic country (or at least classic sounding) -- the new country all sounds the same to me. When George Jones goes (looks like he's going to be around for a while yet!) there will be a huge vacuum.

Add good R&B to the list, like Etta James, Ruth Brown, and I'm a happy woman. I play Etta's '7 Year Itch' CD at the computer, can dance without leaving my chair!

I picked up on the good post-50s rock later on, Clapton, Springsteen, etc. -- some is timeless, still there for the taking. Roy Orbison's 'Black and White' concert is a must-see, the best at their best. The Cream of Clapton is also an awesome trip across his career. Bob Dylan is forever. As are Joni Mitchell, James Taylor ...

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Re: So what music do you guys like besides classical?

Post by Opus132 » Sat Jan 27, 2007 10:02 am

MegaKitsune wrote:Also any music you hate? .
90% of the stuff mentioned in this thread would be a good start. :lol:

I don't listen to a lot of non-classical this days, but i have a selected few artists which i still dig every now and then, mostly King Crimson, some
Frank Zappa, and on the jazz side mostly John Coltrane.

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What other music do I like?

Post by Daisy » Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:19 pm

Well, I love Gilbert & Sullivan, which arguably is still classical music. But I also enjoy Broadway tunes, Japanese music, New Age music, "world" music, and of course Dixieland (I am from New Orleans).

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Post by miranda » Thu Feb 01, 2007 10:24 am

Wow, RebLem, you knew Tampa Red? That's pretty great. He's a favorite of mine.

I love all kinds of music. I'm particular about what artists I'll listen to in each genre, but I listen to a lot of different genres. Bluegrass, country, folk, blues, r & b, jazz, avant-garde jazz, classical, rock, some african and gamelan music, some rap and hip-hop, punk, and some industrial. with the exception of a few bands, most metal music bores me, as does techno and any kind of saccharine commercial pop.
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Post by burnitdown » Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:07 pm

miranda wrote:with the exception of a few bands, most metal music bores me
What are the exceptions? Do tell.

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Post by slofstra » Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:27 pm

I listen to everything from the Stanley Brothers to Ray Davies to Coltrane. But lately I've tapped into some of the music my kids and their friends listen to. In particular, there are currently a few pop artists who eschew the drum machines and music manufacturing scene (from Beyonce to whatever - I really avoid all this kind of stuff) to incorporate more traditional idioms and instruments. Not that the end result is traditional or derivative in any way. I'm referring to artists such as Joanna Newsom, Regina Spektor, Jack Johnson, Sarah Harmer and Sufjan Stevens. Their stuff is without peer in anything in my past even going back to the psychedelic era. (okay, that's tongue-in-cheek). And then there is some fine rock band music and some amazing wit in the likes of: the Shins, Flaming Lips, New Pornographers, Sprites, Cake, Beta Band, Moby ... Stuff I listen to in the car at times; at home it's classical only.

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Post by slofstra » Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:53 pm

I just noticed a mention of Steve Goodman, here. I am a fan. Recently a DVD emerged of his performances on Austin City Limits. At one point I owned all of his records, but they generally paled in comparison to his live performances. There's a good 2 CD retrospective set, one CD of polished studio recordings and another of outtakes. It's the outtakes that stand out and give a real sense of his energy and musicality as a live performer. I saw Goodman several times in Toronto in the 70s, notably at Mariposa around 1972. Who else was there: Martin Carthy, Bruce Cockburn, Bonnie Raitt, Murray McLauchlan, Joni Mitchell (cameo), Neil young (cameo), also the legendary Stan Rogers and John Allan Cameron who recently passed away. Even Bob Dylan and Gord Lightfoot roamed in the audience (there's a photograph) though I never saw either. Anyway, Goodman's performances were electric (figuratively) and through word of mouth, his stages were always packed as the festival wore on, and his buddies John Prine and Dave Bromberg always showed up to jam with him (and he reciprocated for their performances). Little did I know then that I'd never experience anything like this again in my lifetime. Goodman's following in Toronto grew in the following years, and at some point in the 70s he sold out Massey Hall (his records never sold, really) on the strength of his reputation from Mariposa. But his performance that night at Massey Hall was dismal. He showed up with just his guitar and a serious cold (no-one knew about the leukemia), and certainly disappointed my friends who'd come along on the strength of my recommendation. He was just a little too unpredictable - but I know more than one aging folkie who still talk about him.

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