Top 3 foreign sources of U.S. oil: threatened?

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piston
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Top 3 foreign sources of U.S. oil: threatened?

Post by piston » Fri Feb 09, 2007 9:13 am

Before you consult the following source, try to guess which three countries have been supplying most crude oil and petroleum to the United States in 2006 :D Oh, oh, and look who's in fourth position :wink:

http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petr ... mport.html
Last edited by piston on Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Fri Feb 09, 2007 10:48 am

I didn't know Canada was such a big source. Mexico, yes. SA was not a surprise. Neither was Venezuela; one of the people we have to thank for the large amount of oil we get from Venezuela is John T Scopes, much of whose career after he lost his teaching job in Dayton, TN, was a a geologist in Venezuela working for oil companies. One of the results of his work is that the kinds of people who were the bane of his existence in Dayton, TN, still have enough gas to drive to the courthouse to file their silly-ass lawsuits.

And one of the advantages of Nigerian oil is that, unlike much of the other oil we get, particularly from the Saudis, it is light crude rather than heavy crude, and therefore easier and cheaper to refine.
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piston
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Post by piston » Fri Feb 09, 2007 10:58 am

And I didn't know about Scopes in Venezuela. I bet there were fewer Protestant fundamentalists there in the late 1920's! :wink:
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Post by living_stradivarius » Fri Feb 09, 2007 5:12 pm

RebLem wrote:I didn't know Canada was such a big source. Mexico, yes. SA was not a surprise. Neither was Venezuela; one of the people we have to thank for the large amount of oil we get from Venezuela is John T Scopes, much of whose career after he lost his teaching job in Dayton, TN, was a a geologist in Venezuela working for oil companies. One of the results of his work is that the kinds of people who were the bane of his existence in Dayton, TN, still have enough gas to drive to the courthouse to file their silly-ass lawsuits.
The oil sands of Canada were a source of contention b/w the US and China for quite a while.

LOL I just came up with the perfect response to those who keep saying we went into Iraq "for oil." Canada would have been so much easier... :lol:
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Feb 09, 2007 5:16 pm

Very soon Venezuela may be the most problematic of those top four countries.

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piston
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Post by piston » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:15 pm

From today's Globe and Mail (Toronto)

Officials rate threat level low in Alberta oilpatch despite al-Qaida call

JAMES STEVENSON
Canadian Press
CALGARY — Canada's oilpatch remains at a “low threat” standing despite renewed calls by an al-Qaeda affiliate for a terrorist strike on energy targets in all countries that supply the United States with oil.

The message, posted recently on the online magazine Sawt al-Jihad, or Voice of the Holy War, is not the first that specifically names Canada as a potential terrorist target.
But it's believed to be the first time that the Canadian energy industry has been singled out.

And the danger is being taken seriously, said Greg Stringham, vice-president of markets for the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

“We don't have any direct threat, no credible information to say that there's anything coming, but because Canada was mentioned for a second time you should be aware of it and pay extra special attention,” Mr. Stringham said Wednesday.

The threat level in Canada's energy sector has never been moved upward since the system was implemented in the wake of the 2001 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. But that doesn't preclude “preventive intelligence” being passed on to companies to keep a watchful eye for suspicious activities.

“We've alerted all of our members and sent out communications so that they can be extra vigilant and diligent as to Canada and a number of other countries that supply oil and gas to the United States.”

Last week, the Saudi Arabian terrorist faction called al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula published an article titled “Bin Laden and the oil weapon” which says America will never reduce its dependency on oil.

As such, energy installations not only in Saudi Arabia but other producing countries such as Canada, Mexico and Venezuela should be targeted, the article said.
“We should strike petroleum interests in all areas which supply the United States, and not just in the Middle East, because the target is to stop its imports or decrease it by all means.”

It was translated from Arabic to English by the SITE Institute, a not-for-profit U.S. group that monitors terrorist websites.

Alberta, which has its own five-rung threat assessment system independent of industry, also chose not to increase it from the second or “low” level that it has been at for years.
Al Sauve, executive director of the Alberta Sheriffs branch, which includes the counter-terrorism desk, said Canada has been listed as a potential al-Qaeda target several times.
But it was the first time Canada and its energy production were linked.

Canada is the largest exporter of both oil and natural gas to the massive U.S. market. Canadian oil shipments south are also likely to ramp up dramatically with oilsands production in northern Alberta expected to triple over the next decade or so.

Sauve said the online threat provided both good and bad news.
“It's always good that people are aware of the fact that there are potential threats out there,” he said.
“The more people that are aware and sensitive to it, the more chance that we're going to get other information if there in fact is a legitimate threat out there.”

He said the bad news is that it makes Albertans “even more sensitive to the fact that there are these sorts of possibilities out there, and it kind of raises the angst a bit.”

In Ottawa, Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day said the federal government was also taking the threats seriously. “We've always said that we're not immune to possibilities of terrorism.”

John Thompson, a terrorism expert with the Toronto-based Mackenzie Institute, which studies political instability and organized violence, said the group's intention to do harm was true, but its capability was missing.

“They may be around, but there's not likely to be a critical mass, and the most they might do is basic low-level sabotage like sticking a hole in a pipeline,” he said.
“It's always possible; it's just not very likely at the moment.”
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

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