Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

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dulcinea
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Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by dulcinea » Sun Oct 19, 2014 7:30 pm

I already told you my reminiscence about the skit writer who misused the name of Beethoven because he was totally ignorant about pop music and could not think of names as obvious as Gershwin, Porter, Bacharach, McCartney and Puerto Rico's own Rafael Hernandez.
What outrageous examples of musical name dropping that betrayed rank ignorance of music have you experienced?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

dulcinea
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by dulcinea » Thu Oct 23, 2014 6:30 pm

dulcinea wrote:I already told you my reminiscence about the skit writer who misused the name of Beethoven because he was totally ignorant about pop music and could not think of names as obvious as Gershwin, Porter, Bacharach, McCartney and Puerto Rico's own Rafael Hernandez.
What outrageous examples of musical name dropping that betrayed rank ignorance of music have you experienced?
OK, how about this?:
in Puerto Rico it is frequent to call every type of Kunstmusik--from waltzes to concerti--SINFONIAS=SYMPHONIES. Similarly it's a frequent habit to call all photographs, regardless of subject, RETRATOS=PORTRAITS, no doubt because the first photographs known in PR were mostly portraits.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Lance
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by Lance » Thu Oct 23, 2014 8:38 pm

Well, this has something to with name-dropping. I may have imparted one of these before, but it's worth repeating.

We have a number of streets in Binghamton, NY named after composers or writers, including Mozart, Goethe, Haydn (only spelled Hayden!), Mendelssohn, etc. Also Beethoven, of course. Most people unfamiliar with music who live near or on that street invariably say BEEE-THO-VEN street. And as for Mozart, it's called MOH-ZART. Goethe is given the pronunciation GO--ETH. So much for culture. It really surprised me when one knowledgeable person referred to pianist Artur Schnabel as Artur SHNAY-BELL.

On the radio one, it was announced (somewhere in the Syracuse, NY area), that Chopin (SHOW-PAN) was known for playing in SALOONS (not salons). I rolled on the floor with that one.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Chalkperson
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by Chalkperson » Thu Oct 23, 2014 10:25 pm

dulcinea wrote:
dulcinea wrote:I already told you my reminiscence about the skit writer who misused the name of Beethoven because he was totally ignorant about pop music and could not think of names as obvious as Gershwin, Porter, Bacharach, McCartney and Puerto Rico's own Rafael Hernandez.
What outrageous examples of musical name dropping that betrayed rank ignorance of music have you experienced?
OK, how about this?:
in Puerto Rico it is frequent to call every type of Kunstmusik--from waltzes to concerti--SINFONIAS=SYMPHONIES. Similarly it's a frequent habit to call all photographs, regardless of subject, RETRATOS=PORTRAITS, no doubt because the first photographs known in PR were mostly portraits.
So what, people in the UK call Vacuum Cleaners a Hoover, or the output from a Copying Machine a Xerox.

Also a vertical photograph is known as Portrait, a horizontal photo a Landscape.

Words have multiple meanings...
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

John F
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by John F » Fri Oct 24, 2014 3:05 am

Nowadays, any kind of music can be called a song, including a movement from a piano sonata. The first I became aware of this was when iTunes (I think) did it for its downloads, including classical music, whose works were divided up into short sections - not just an aria in a complete opera recording, but a movement in a symphony, was called a song, and you had to download four songs to get the complete Eroica Symphony.

Since I've never done this and don't know from iTunes, I may not have it exactly right. Chalkie probably knows all about it.
John Francis

jbuck919
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Oct 24, 2014 3:30 am

Lance wrote:Well, this has something to with name-dropping. I may have imparted one of these before, but it's worth repeating.

We have a number of streets in Binghamton, NY named after composers or writers, including Mozart, Goethe, Haydn (only spelled Hayden!), Mendelssohn, etc. Also Beethoven, of course. Most people unfamiliar with music who live near or on that street invariably say BEEE-THO-VEN street. And as for Mozart, it's called MOH-ZART. Goethe is given the pronunciation GO--ETH. So much for culture. It really surprised me when one knowledgeable person referred to pianist Artur Schnabel as Artur SHNAY-BELL.

On the radio one, it was announced (somewhere in the Syracuse, NY area), that Chopin (SHOW-PAN) was known for playing in SALOONS (not salons). I rolled on the floor with that one.
Binghamton has streets named after great composers? Good grief. My knowledge which I hope to take with me to my deathbed is thus enriched. ;) (Binghamton, for those who do not know, is the main city in the region of New York known as the Southern Tier. It has one of the major campuses of the State University, for what that's worth, which may not be much. I think their proudest claim is that Lance Hill lives there.)

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dulcinea
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by dulcinea » Fri Oct 24, 2014 7:40 am

Lance wrote:Well, this has something to with name-dropping. I may have imparted one of these before, but it's worth repeating.

We have a number of streets in Binghamton, NY named after composers or writers, including Mozart, Goethe, Haydn (only spelled Hayden!), Mendelssohn, etc. Also Beethoven, of course. Most people unfamiliar with music who live near or on that street invariably say BEEE-THO-VEN street. And as for Mozart, it's called MOH-ZART. Goethe is given the pronunciation GO--ETH. So much for culture. It really surprised me when one knowledgeable person referred to pianist Artur Schnabel as Artur SHNAY-BELL.

On the radio one, it was announced (somewhere in the Syracuse, NY area), that Chopin (SHOW-PAN) was known for playing in SALOONS (not salons). I rolled on the floor with that one.
Well, let's be glad that nobody ever shot that particular piano player, who always did the best he could.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Lance
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by Lance » Fri Oct 24, 2014 12:17 pm

:oops: :oops: :oops:
Wow, John ... thank you for the comment. I'm blushing! Indeed, there is/was lots to Binghamton, N.Y. We have an enormous amount of culture here ... a symphony orchestra, an opera company, the Phelps Mansion Museum Second Sunday Concerts, Classical Pianists of the Future (of which I am president and present two welll-received recitals a year!), a classical music radio station (NPR), and of course, Binghamton University, which has a great music department of which I was the piano technician for 26 years until I retired. We have theater groups such as S.T.A.R., the Cider Mill Playhouse (very active), reading groups, and yes - streets named after composers! We were the home to IBM, Link Aviation, Hughes Aircraft, Endicott Johnson Shoes (at one time the largest producer of real leather shoes in the world). We have the Goodwill Theater/Firehouse Stage, which offers classical concerts, cabaret events, plays, heavy jazz programs by the likes of Al Hamme and friends, and, just for added information, this was the home of Leroy "Slam" Stewart, who performed world-wide with Benny Goodman and other noted jazz musicians. We were friends and I often tuned his piano. We also have the Roberson Museum of Arts & Sciences, another wonderful Victorian mansion in the manner of the Phelps Mansion Museum.

Unfortunately, we are no longer the Silicon Valley of the East, as many businesses have moved on (though IBM still has a presence here), and there are some major corporations still here. Probably our largest employer now is the State University of New York at Binghamton. It was just announced today they are expanding and are adding a pharmacology school to their ever-growing university.

SO: who wants to make Binghamton, New York their home - after seeing all this? (It's a great place to live and work.) All this is much more than you need to know, but I got carried away with John's glowing statement about yours truly!

OH! And one more important thing: Binghamton is the home of the Classical Music Guide forums!
jbuck919 wrote:
Lance wrote:Well, this has something to with name-dropping. I may have imparted one of these before, but it's worth repeating.

We have a number of streets in Binghamton, NY named after composers or writers, including Mozart, Goethe, Haydn (only spelled Hayden!), Mendelssohn, etc. Also Beethoven, of course. Most people unfamiliar with music who live near or on that street invariably say BEEE-THO-VEN street. And as for Mozart, it's called MOH-ZART. Goethe is given the pronunciation GO--ETH. So much for culture. It really surprised me when one knowledgeable person referred to pianist Artur Schnabel as Artur SHNAY-BELL.

On the radio one, it was announced (somewhere in the Syracuse, NY area), that Chopin (SHOW-PAN) was known for playing in SALOONS (not salons). I rolled on the floor with that one.
Binghamton has streets named after great composers? Good grief. My knowledge which I hope to take with me to my deathbed is thus enriched. ;) (Binghamton, for those who do not know, is the main city in the region of New York known as the Southern Tier. It has one of the major campuses of the State University, for what that's worth, which may not be much. I think their proudest claim is that Lance Hill lives there.)
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

THEHORN
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by THEHORN » Wed Nov 12, 2014 10:55 pm

Years ago, one of the reporters on I believe ABC TV was convering a concert in the parks by the New York Philharmonic during the Summer . In the background, you could hear the orchestra
playing Rossini's familiar overture to Semiramide under a conductor whose name I don't recall .
The reporter, instead of pronouncing it the correct Italian way Se-mi-RAM- i deh ,
said Se-MIR - uh- mide, the last syllable rhyming with side, or hide .
He made it sound like some kind of industrial chemical ! Obviously , he was no expert on opera .

Ted Quanrud
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by Ted Quanrud » Wed Nov 12, 2014 11:55 pm

Lance wrote:We have a number of streets in Binghamton, NY named after composers or writers, including Mozart, Goethe, Haydn (only spelled Hayden!), Mendelssohn, etc. Also Beethoven, of course. Most people unfamiliar with music who live near or on that street invariably say BEEE-THO-VEN street. And as for Mozart, it's called MOH-ZART. Goethe is given the pronunciation GO--ETH. So much for culture. It really surprised me when one knowledgeable person referred to pianist Artur Schnabel as Artur SHNAY-BELL.
Years ago, I was in Salvage One, an enormous old factory building in an unsavory section of Chicago, filled with old fireplace mantles, staircases and other architectural details rescued from demolished buildings. In a pile of Chicago's old black-on-yellow street signs, I found a sign for North Mozart Street. It has since announced the entrance of my listening room in Bismarck, ND

Auntie Lynn
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by Auntie Lynn » Thu Nov 13, 2014 9:15 am

I absolutely adore Rafael Hernandez - play all his stuff all the time - and guess what, there is great demand for it, borinque...

lennygoran
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by lennygoran » Thu Nov 13, 2014 9:26 am

Auntie Lynn wrote:I absolutely adore Rafael Hernandez - play all his stuff all the time - and guess what, there is great demand for it, borinque...
Never heard of him--just listened to preciosa--very pleasant. Regards, Len

bigshot
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Re: Feast of Pure Ridiculousness

Post by bigshot » Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:57 pm

My pop used to jokingly say his favorite composer was Wolfgang von Beethoven. But he was just being cute.

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