Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

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jserraglio
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Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jul 27, 2018 3:24 pm

Cleveland Orchestra concertmaster William Preucil suspended amid sexual assault allegations
ClevelandNews5
by Drew Scofield
July 27, 2018


Image
Concertmaster William Preucil | January 29, 2016 | Photo by Rodrigo Varela/Getty Images for The Cleveland Orchestra

CLEVELAND - William Preucil, the Cleveland Orchestra's concertmaster, has been suspended following allegations of sexual assault raised in an article by The Washington Post.

André Gremillet, Executive Director of The Cleveland Orchestra, released the following statement:
The Cleveland Orchestra was not aware of the allegations reported by The Washington Post about William Preucil in their July 26, 2018 article. We take this matter very seriously and will promptly conduct an independent investigation. Mr. Preucil has been suspended until further notice.
Preucil became concertmaster for the orchestra in 1995.

______________________________________________________

The Washington Post
Assaults in dressing rooms. Groping during lessons. Classical musicians reveal a profession rife with harassment.
By Anne Midgette and Peggy McGlone
July 26, 2018


Violinist Zeneba Bowers was 26 when she says she asked William Preucil, the concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra, out for a drink after a lesson in 1998. Bowers was a member of the New World Symphony in Miami, the elite training orchestra, which had hired Preucil, then 40 and widely hailed as the greatest living concertmaster, to teach the New World’s young musicians.

For a young violinist like Bowers, the chance to talk shop informally with someone at Preucil’s level was a precious opportunity, and Bowers said she would deliberately take the last lesson of the day with the hopes of talking with the teacher afterward.

On the night that they went out, Bowers says she was flattered and thought she had been accepted into an insider network when Preucil, after a few drinks, asked her back to his hotel room for a cigar. But once in his room she says he began aggressively kissing her, opening her buttons, pushing her onto the bed. She says she was stunned and horrified, and fought him off and ran home. A few minutes later, he called her and threatened to blacklist her if she told anybody, she says.

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William Preucil, the Cleveland Orchestra concertmaster, shown in Severance Hall in 2000, has been accused of harassing women. (Associated Press)

“We’re both adults,” Bowers says Preucil told her. “You know how this works.”

Bowers called her best friend immediately; her friend confirmed the call to a Washington Post reporter.

Preucil said through a Cleveland Orchestra spokesman that he was not available for comment.

Onstage, classical music is larger than life. But the preparation behind the scenes takes place in more intimate environments than most workplaces: dressing rooms, rehearsal studios or windowless practice rooms in hours of one-on-one instruction. And in a field that venerates authority and embraces the widespread fallacy that great artists live outside the mores of society, these conditions can create fertile ground for harassment.

The downfall of movie producer Harvey Weinstein in October led to the toppling of prominent men in many fields. Classical music’s #MeToo moment erupted in December, when star conductor James Levine was suspended from the Metropolitan Opera after people came forward with claims of abuse. Levine, who was later dismissed, denied the charges and is suing the Met, which is countersuing him.

Twelve international orchestras cut ties with the powerful conductor Charles Dutoit after multiple women accused him of abusive behavior, including rape. Dutoit denied the allegations, telling the Associated Press in January, “I am shaken to the core by this bewildering and baseless charge . . . I submit my categorical and complete denial.”

Conductor Daniel Lipton, who resigned from Opera Tampa last year, was accused of unwanted kissing and groping by two women after word that Canadian officials had issued an arrest warrant for a sexual assault in the late 1980s. Opera Tampa officials had bought out his contract in July because they had concerns, according to reports. Lipton denied the charges. “Not everything which one prints is correct,” he said. “Things which have been put in the press are totally inaccurate.”

Flute professor Bradley Garner retired from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music toward the end of an internal investigation that uncovered allegations that he had made unwanted sexual advances to students for years. Garner’s lawyer, Subodh Chandra, said Garner resigned because university officials denied him due process. “He submitted an affidavit under oath, in which he denied the allegations,” Chandra said.

Over a six-month period starting last November, The Washington Post spoke to more than 50 musicians who say they were victims of sexual harassment. These artists, many of whom shared their stories for the first time, described experiences ranging from sexual harassment to sexual assault, at every level from local teachers to international superstars. Opera singers spoke of attempted assaults in dressing rooms or in the wings during performances. Students described teachers inappropriately touching their bodies during lessons.

Young artists in conservatories and training programs such as the New World Symphony are especially vulnerable, interviews showed. Individual teachers have enormous power over their students’ future careers: A good word can open doors, a bad one shut them forever. High-profile instructors like Preucil — whose alleged interaction with Bowers in Miami has not been previously reported — attract donors and new talent, and institutions might be reluctant to discipline them.

Deborah Borda, the president and chief executive of the New York Philharmonic and the highest-ranking female administrator in classical music, says she was harassed early in her career, an incident she says is still both vivid and painful to recall. “Harassment has been going on for centuries,” she says. “It will take us time to achieve true equality. That’s the story I see happening right now.”


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Now chief conductor of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, Daniele Gatti allegedly groped and kissed two women in his dressing rooms in Chicago and Italy in 1996 and 2000. He says he was always “fully convinced the interest was mutual.” (Michaela Rihova/CTK via Associated Press)

The fear of coming forward

Landing a spot in a young-artist program at a major opera house is a ticket to a big career for emerging singers. Soprano Alicia Berneche was 24 on her first day at the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Opera Center in 1996, and she was beaming as she sat in the auditorium when Daniele Gatti, the internationally renowned conductor, then 34, stepped off the podium to speak to her. Berneche says that he offered her a coaching session — just the kind of opportunity the opera program recommended young artists take — and that she followed him to his dressing room to set up a time. But once inside, she claims, she found “his hands on my rear end, and his tongue down my throat.” One of Berneche’s friends confirmed to The Post that the singer had talked about the experience at the time.

Berneche isn’t the only one to make allegations about Gatti, who is now chief conductor of the great Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam (and will tour the United States with it in the spring of 2019). The soprano Jeanne-Michèle Charbonnet told The Post that Gatti tried something similar with her when she was singing in Wagner’s “The Flying Dutchman” in Bologna, Italy, four years later. “I pushed him off and ran out of the room,” Charbonnet says. The company never hired her again. A friend of Charbonnet’s told The Post that she had told her about the incident, many years later.

Berneche says she wanted to report Gatti’s behavior but a well-meaning adviser to whom she had turned said, “If you come forward, you will be fired, and he will continue.” Meanwhile, she had another month of rehearsals with Gatti to get through. The solution she came up with was to take the blame herself. “I wrote him a letter,” she says, “apologizing for coming on to him.”

In a statement delivered through a spokesman, Gatti said he was surprised by the charges. “All my life I have always been totally alien to any behavior that may be referred to [by] the term harassment, whether psychological or sexual,” he said. “Every time I have approached someone, I have always done it fully convinced that the interest was mutual. The facts referred to took place a long time ago, but if I have offended anyone, I sincerely apologize.”

In the upper echelons of the classical music world, stars often don’t face accountability for their actions. Opera is a largely freelance field, where artists come in for a few weeks to rehearse and perform a production, and then move on to the next one. Human resources officials who deal with the concerns of chorus members and apprentices may not have much clout with a jet-setting conductor.

“The fear was that somehow it would get back to the person that the complaint was made about, and it would ruin a career or diminish opportunities,” says Deborah Allton-Maher, associate executive director of the American Guild of Musical Artists, the union that represents performing artists including ballet dancers and opera singers.

Three years ago, prompted by a discussion in a closed Facebook group of hundreds of opera professionals, union members compiled dozens of anonymous stories of abuse and brought them to the union leadership. The union responded, Allton-Maher said, by creating an online system where people could anonymously report harassment. No one had used it before the reckoning on sexual harassment captured the nation’s attention, she said, “But we have had more reports from members since this has become front and center.”

“It says a lot about the climate. It was still far too risky to make a complaint,” she said.

'I lost my confidence'

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Bernard Uzan, artist’s manager and stage director: Four women spoke on the record to The Washington Post about his behavior. (Uzan International Arts)

Bernard Uzan, 73, is a ubiquitous presence in mid-level opera companies. Born in Tunisia and educated in France, he has been an administrator, a director and an artist’s manager — someone who helps singers find work — over a career spanning many decades. He used to run the Opera de Montreal; he is now a co-director of the young artists’ program at the Florida Grand Opera. Four women spoke on the record to The Washington Post with allegations about Uzan’s behavior — charges he denies.

Soprano Diane Alexander says Uzan embraced her and pressed his erection against her in a hotel elevator when she was in the Merola young-artist program at the San Francisco Opera in 1986. Seventeen years later, when she needed new management after her agent retired, she joined Uzan’s roster, thinking the incident was long forgotten, until she says Uzan reminded her that he had long been attracted to her. Still, he represented her without incident for about a year, until 2005, when she starred in a production of Verdi’s “La Traviata” at Opera Carolina in Charlotte. Not only did Uzan find her the job, he also was directing the production. Alexander says Uzan began propositioning her via online messages late at night. She blocked his messages, and, she says, his sexual advances stopped — but he became critical of her performance for the rest of the run. “It was more emotional abuse, more a power thing,” Alexander says. It also undermined her confidence and made it difficult to perform. Alexander’s teacher told The Post that she remembers speaking to her almost nightly to try to help her through the experience.

In 2008, mezzo-soprano Erin Elizabeth Smith, then 29, went out for drinks to discuss her career with Uzan, who had just taken her onto his roster. Uzan had other things on his mind, she says. “This is what you do to me,” Smith recalls Uzan saying as he pushed himself back from the table so she could see his erect penis inside his pants. Then, she says, he stuck his thumb in her mouth and asked her to suck it. Smith says that she made excuses and left but that Uzan continued calling for days, until she told him she didn’t want a physical relationship. A few days later, she says, Uzan dropped her from his roster, citing other reasons. A friend corroborated that she had told him about Uzan’s behavior soon after it occurred.

“I lost my confidence,” Smith says. She felt, she says, “the only reason I’m on his roster is that he wanted to sleep with me. It made me doubt my talent.”

Xixi Shepard, a mezzo-soprano formerly known as Elspeth Kincaid, recalls her first meeting with Uzan in 2008, at dinner, shortly after she joined his roster. After drinking a lot of wine, she says, he told her at length about his talent for oral sex “and invited me to experience this so-called talent of his directly after dinner.” Her mother confirmed that Shepard told her about the incident immediately after it happened.

Mezzo-soprano Carla Dirlikov had been on Uzan’s roster for about a year when she says he cornered her at a 2010 audition and said “something along the lines of, ‘I’ve been waiting for this. I want to sleep with you.’ ” She says that after she declined, he began telling companies that she wasn’t interested in working with them, and saying negative things about her and her lack of sexual attractiveness. Finally, in 2011, during a rehearsal of a “Rigoletto” that Uzan was directing in Detroit, Dirlikov says he put his hand on her breast in a crowded rehearsal room. “I stepped back and said, ‘What the hell are you doing,’ ” Dirlikov says. “And he said, ‘I felt like it.’ ” A colleague recalls the incident and talking to upset cast members about it afterward.

Members of the company and the union asked Dirlikov about pressing charges, but Uzan was still her manager and she was too scared to do anything. “I didn’t see another path,” she says. “It was either, you learn to get a thick skin and you learn to deal with the industry and you’re lucky you have work . . . or work at Starbucks, or go back to school.” But she did eventually leave Uzan’s roster and find another path, performing as head of her own not-for-profit organization that links music with social activism.

“I want women to know they can stand up for themselves,” she says now.

Uzan, contacted by phone, denies the charges. “Groping, that I deny completely,” he says. “Yes, probably I have been flirting with women, that’s possible. Did I insist or push somebody? That’s not possible. Did I push somebody verbally to sleep with me? Absolutely not. Did I blackmail somebody? Absolutely not.”

“I hurt people, I am sure,” he adds. “I am a big temperament, and I always say exactly what I think. I may have said things that were not taken well.” But his “enemies,” he says, “believe I have so much power. I never did.”

'Humongously impactful'

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Violinist Zeneba Bowers says Preucil tried to force himself on her in a Florida hotel room. (Amy Dickerson)

William Preucil, the violinist whom Bowers encountered in Miami, is celebrated as the best concertmaster in the country, at one of the country’s greatest orchestras. A faculty member at the Cleveland Institute of Music, he often travels elsewhere for teaching gigs.

A violinist who played in the New World Symphony says Preucil propositioned her after an uncomfortable dinner at a Miami steakhouse in 2000. When she dropped him off at his hotel, he suggested she come up to his room. “I can see you at the audition next month or you can come upstairs and let me lick you all over,” she recalls him saying. She drove away and soon thereafter told a friend about the incident, which the friend confirmed. The musician spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the insular nature of the orchestra world. Although Preucil did not respond to multiple Washington Post requests for an interview, Justin Holden, the director of public relations at the Cleveland Orchestra, said in an email, “We reached Mr. Preucil and informed him of your request. He indicated that he is not available.”

A 2007 article in the Cleveland Scene about Preucil and his influence at the Cleveland Orchestra describes an allegation of a sexual advance toward one of his students. According to that story, Preucil responded to the allegation in an email to the reporter, “The issue was fully reviewed by the institution and was resolved to everyone’s satisfaction.”

In 2010, more than 10 years after the Miami encounter, Bowers learned that Preucil had been hired as guest concertmaster for a program with the Nashville Symphony, the orchestra she joined in 1999. She was so upset that she told the orchestra’s human resources office about the earlier incident and said she couldn’t play with him. An official at the orchestra confirmed that Bowers and her husband, a cellist, were given excused absences for the week Preucil was in Nashville.

Bowers still plays with the Nashville Symphony. Her history with Preucil “shut off the options of going to a lot of places,” she says. “I would look and see where he was, and make a plan not to go. This was a humongously impactful thing on my career. It changed where I would consider auditioning.”


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The conductor Charles Dutoit initially responded to charges of harassment by saying that “informal physical contact is commonplace in the arts world as a mutual gesture of friendship” but that he had never forced himself on anyone. After a musician claimed that he had raped her in 1988, the maestro fell silent. (Alex Brandon Associated Press)

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The conductor James Levine, dismissed by the Metropolitan Opera after multiple accusations of sexual harassment, has denied the charges and is now suing the Met, which is countersuing him. (Michael Dwyer Associated Press)

'This is not okay'

There is no consensus about whether the #MeToo movement will lead to meaningful change in the field. But there are signs people are starting to push back. In November, students at the Berklee College of Music in Boston marched in the streets in protest after revelations that 11 teachers had been dismissed on sexual harassment charges in the previous 13 years, complaining of the school’s insufficient response. Other music schools are taking note. “We are going through an extensive revision of our policy right now, as everybody’s doing,” says K. James McDowell, president and artistic director of the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia, a leading training center for opera singers.

Artists who had been silent are telling their stories. Former soprano Robin Follman didn’t tell anyone for a decade about her experiences with William Florescu, general director of the Florentine Opera in Milwaukee, where she sang “Madame Butterfly.” She says Florescu’s continuous harassment culminated on a night when he drove her to a secluded area and subjected her to nonconsensual sexual acts. It was the worst experience of her career, but she never spoke about it. “There wasn’t the right person to go to then,” Follman says. “When you’re being followed by [the general director], there’s no one to go to.”

But earlier this year, after speaking to a Post reporter, Follman confided in a friend, who immediately contacted the Florentine Opera board. The company quickly sent a team to interview her, twice, about what had happened. “I’m so impressed with how the opera company handled it,” she says.

Florescu resigned in May, and the company later said his departure was “related to his violation of the Florentine Opera’s policies and prohibitions concerning sexual misconduct.”

Follman says she decided to speak now not only because of the changing climate, but also because she has the security of an entirely different life. “Back then, it was my livelihood,” says Follman, now chief executive of a manufacturing company. “My ability to put food on the table was threatened. I was just trying to get the next job.” The incident was a major factor in her decision to leave opera a few years later. “I never got over that,” she says.

Multiple attempts to reach Florescu for comment were unsuccessful.

The response of companies like the Florentine Opera has begun to shift musicians’ ideas about institutional complicity.

Reevaluating the past, and bringing old stories into the open, can be a significant step in changing the narrative.

“I thought this behavior was totally okay and normal,” Smith says now. “It’s only recently that I’ve been waking up to the fact that this is not okay.”

“Realizing that men like that are losing their power because of this, this women’s movement really is just so, so great,” says mezzo-soprano Shepard. “These people don’t have power anymore, once you realize in your head what happened.”

jserraglio
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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jul 27, 2018 5:26 pm

NY Times
Cleveland Orchestra Suspends a Star After Accusation of Assault
By Michael Cooper
July 27, 2018

The classical music world’s reckoning with sexual misconduct and abuse continued on Friday when the Cleveland Orchestra suspended the violinist William Preucil, its concertmaster of more than two decades, while it investigates accusations that he sexually assaulted a violin student in 1998.

The orchestra announced the investigation a day after The Washington Post reported the allegations made by the violinist, Zeneba Bowers, who accused him of aggressively kissing her, unbuttoning her clothes and pushing her onto the bed in his hotel room after he had given her a lesson at the New World Symphony, an elite training academy in Miami. After she ran home, she told The Post, Mr. Preucil telephoned her and threatened to blacklist her if she told anyone.

The Cleveland Orchestra, which is routinely ranked at or near the top of American orchestras, promised to conduct an independent investigation of Mr. Preucil. As concertmaster, or leader of the first violins, Mr. Preucil is second in importance and power only to the orchestra’s conductor. And he is a well-known figure in musical circles. But he has been accused of misconduct before, in a 2007 report in the Cleveland Scene.

André Gremillet, the orchestra’s executive director, said that officials there had not been aware of the new allegations detailed in The Post, which also reported that Mr. Preucil had lewdly propositioned another unnamed violinist with the New World Symphony in 2000.

“We take this matter very seriously and will promptly conduct an independent investigation,” Mr. Gremillet said in a statement. “Mr. Preucil has been suspended until further notice.”

Mr. Preucil, who The Post said had not responded to multiple requests for interviews, did not immediately return an email seeking comment. In addition to playing with the orchestra, he performs chamber music and teaches — as a distinguished professor of violin at the Cleveland Institute of Music and at Furman University.

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by david johnson » Sat Jul 28, 2018 4:16 am

A rough kick in the crotch is what they need. However, I do not understand how there can be a statute of limitations for some crimes but not one for allegations. How does that work?

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by Ricordanza » Sat Jul 28, 2018 6:16 am

david johnson wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 4:16 am
A rough kick in the crotch is what they need. However, I do not understand how there can be a statute of limitations for some crimes but not one for allegations. How does that work?
A statute of limitations is a time limit on commencing a criminal prosecution. For example, if there is a 12-year statute of limitations on sexual assault in the state where the crime occurred, and the incident occurred on November 13, 1998, formal charges must be presented by November 12, 2010.

However, the statute of limitations only affects criminal charges and has no impact on an employer's ability to take action against an employee. Also, a statute of limitations for criminal charges has no impact upon a civil action that the victim may initiate. There are different statutes of limitations for various types of civil actions.

As for allegations, there's really no time limit on when an individual can assert that they have been victimized. In the case of Bill Cosby, for example, some women came forward and alleged that he had sexually assaulted them 40 years ago. The statute of limitations only affects the consequences of that allegation. Of all the women who came forward to claim that Cosby sexually assaulted them, Andrea Constand's allegation was the only one that fell within Pennsylvania's statute of limitations.

I hope that answers your question.

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by maestrob » Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:02 am

Sexual assault has been common in the classical music world since the beginning of time, as in all fields where there is inequality of power. From personal experience,I can say that it happens to both sexes. And yes, I was propositioned by my male voice teacher when I was in high school. My reaction was to report the incident to the person who referred me to that teacher, and I stopped taking lessons. Luckily my voice held up through graduation, where I sang a solo, but I lost my high notes without lessons for roughly ten years and sang in choruses until I finally found a decent teacher with an excellent vocal technique. Luckily, he referred me to La Selva, through whom I learned conducting technique, and the rest, as they say, is history. :D

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:50 am

maestrob wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:02 am
Sexual assault has been common in the classical music world since the beginning of time, as in all fields where there is inequality of power. From personal experience,I can say that it happens to both sexes. And yes, I was propositioned by my male voice teacher when I was in high school. My reaction was to report the incident to the person who referred me to that teacher, and I stopped taking lessons. Luckily my voice held up through graduation, where I sang a solo, but I lost my high notes without lessons for roughly ten years and sang in choruses until I finally found a decent teacher with an excellent vocal technique. Luckily, he referred me to La Selva, through whom I learned conducting technique, and the rest, as they say, is history. :D
Good heavens, b! Apart from the immediate horror of such inappropriate, indeed criminal, behavior, people who do this make it infinitely more difficult for the decent ones who would never think of such a thing. I've been teaching for years, and I can't even put a kind supportive hand on a student's shoulder in a moment of need without fear that it would be misunderstood.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Sat Jul 28, 2018 12:39 pm

Ronan Farrow's investigative report on sexual abuse at CBS Corp (New Yorker, 3 & 16 Aug. issue, linked in rhe Pub) lays bare how large organizations (Fox and CBS news, congress, the church, orchestras, opera companies) are prone to close ranks to enable and protect abusers, esp. their top brass: CEOs, music directors, cardinal archbishops, news commentators, congressmen, etc.

Belle
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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by Belle » Sat Jul 28, 2018 8:18 pm

jserraglio wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 12:39 pm
Ronan Farrow's investigative report on sexual abuse at CBS Corp (New Yorker, 3 & 16 Aug. issue, linked in rhe Pub) lays bare how large organizations (Fox and CBS news, congress, the church, orchestras, opera companies) are prone to close ranks to enable and protect abusers, esp. their top brass: CEOs, music directors, cardinal archbishops, news commentators, congressmen, etc.
When I was a very young woman my mother taught my 3 sisters and me that there were sexual predators out there in almost every field of endeavour and that there were significant steps one could take to avoid being a victim. One of these was NEVER to go into a private room with a male and never give the slightest hint of any kind of sexual interest. But the Womens' Lib movement gave women a false sense of security and their mothers stopped telling them these important things. Now it has all gone pear-shaped. There's still criminality and there always will be and there are few things we can do to avoid that; and that's when we expect the law to intervene. And the law need to apply serious sanctions, not just 'home detention' to a serial offender, appeal pending or not. That sends an appalling message. And it's a good thing Carlos Kleiber, with his womanizing ways, isn't around today!!

And what constitutes "rape" now? Is it attempting to kiss a woman? I think we need to be told.

Another aspect to this is that women and men haven't been working together side-by-side for very long in human history and the 'rules' are desperately in need of formulation. It used to be OK for the secretary to have 'an affair' with the boss; remember Billy Wilder's film "1,2,3" and the jokes behind almost the entire plot. Frau von Ingeborg is the secretary to the James Cagney character, McNamara; she comes in to 'take dictation' and is chewing gum. She sits down, crosses her leg in her super short skirt and starts to take the dictation. The phone rings; it's McNamara wife. Frau von Ingebord pulls her skirt down when she realizes who is on the other end of the phone!! McNamara tells his wife he can't come home early tonight for supper because "I've got a desk full of work"!! The audience laughed along with these gags for decades. Here is Frau von Ingeborg:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DD5AQluWoIM

Nobody told them when they had to stop laughing.

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:19 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:50 am
maestrob wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:02 am
Sexual assault has been common in the classical music world since the beginning of time, as in all fields where there is inequality of power. From personal experience,I can say that it happens to both sexes. And yes, I was propositioned by my male voice teacher when I was in high school. My reaction was to report the incident to the person who referred me to that teacher, and I stopped taking lessons. Luckily my voice held up through graduation, where I sang a solo, but I lost my high notes without lessons for roughly ten years and sang in choruses until I finally found a decent teacher with an excellent vocal technique. Luckily, he referred me to La Selva, through whom I learned conducting technique, and the rest, as they say, is history. :D
Good heavens, b! Apart from the immediate horror of such inappropriate, indeed criminal, behavior, people who do this make it infinitely more difficult for the decent ones who would never think of such a thing. I've been teaching for years, and I can't even put a kind supportive hand on a student's shoulder in a moment of need without fear that it would be misunderstood.
More important and even more honorable than the people who would never think of such a thing are those who do think of such things, but have the character and discipline to resist temptation.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:11 am

RebLem wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:19 pm
those who do think of such things, but have the character and discipline to resist temptation.
Some are better suited to resist temptation than others.

"I've looked on a lot of women with lust. I've committed adultery in my heart many times." —Jimmy Carter 1976

“You know, it doesn’t really matter what [the media] write as long as you’ve got a young and beautiful piece of ass.” —Donald Trump 1991

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by Lance » Sun Jul 29, 2018 1:01 pm

I'm surprised about the Carter quotation. Nobody has been able to come up with anything really sensational about him. The Trump remark, however, doesn't surprise me in the least.
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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:43 pm

jserraglio wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:11 am
RebLem wrote:
Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:19 pm
those who do think of such things, but have the character and discipline to resist temptation.
Some are better suited to resist temptation than others.

"I've looked on a lot of women with lust. I've committed adultery in my heart many times." —Jimmy Carter 1976
Yeah it was an interview for Playboy, and it was one of the big mistakes of his career, which I imagine he still regrets. He did go on to say that he had only really loved his wife and had never been unfaithful to her, which I believe.

If you compare American presidents with potentates from other times and places, they have been a remarkably faithful bunch, starting with George Washington. Thomas Jefferson does not count because he was a widower, and Grover Cleveland does not count because he fathered a child (whom he acknowledged) before he was married. One has to advance all the way to Warren G. Harding to find a known case of infidelity. It does accelerate a bit from there, but not by all that much, when you consider the aphrodisiac effect of men of power. Many of our presidents were positively uxorious. Even Richard Nixon was seen to cry uncontrollably in public when his wife died. Trump is a aberration in every respect, including discretion about his supposed sexual prowess. Most of us will not live long enough to witness historians judge him the worst president we've ever had, but that is what he is.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Sun Jul 29, 2018 5:26 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:43 pm
they have been a remarkably faithful bunch, starting with George Washington.
With his wife, George may have been practiced monumental discipline and restraint. With his favorite slaves, well, maybe not so much.

Ona Judge
https://www.mountvernon.org/library/dig ... /ona-judge
Sarah Pierson
George Washington University

Ona "Oney" Judge Staines served as personal servant to Martha Washington until she escaped from the President's Mansion in Philadelphia and relocated to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1796. Much is known of Judge's life in comparison to Washington's other slaves, as a result of newspaper interviews she gave in 1845 and 1847, as well as George Washington’s frustrated attempts to recover her after she ran away.

Born at Mount Vernon around 1773, Judge was the daughter of dower slave Betty and European-American tailor Andrew Judge. Like her mother, Judge was a skilled seamstress and by her own account was never taught to read or write while living at Mount Vernon, nor was she exposed to any religion. At age ten, Judge was incorporated into Mount Vernon's labor force, working in the Mansion. Always a personal favorite of Martha Washington's, Judge was one of the handful of slaves brought by George and Martha Washington to New York in 1789 and then to Philadelphia in 1790 at the start of the presidency. However, she was never kept in Pennsylvania for more than six months at a time to avoid establishing a legal residency that under Pennsylvania law (1780's An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery) would free her from enslavement.

Judge's escape from the President's Mansion in Philadelphia was most likely inspired and facilitated by her exposure to free blacks in a city with fervent abolitionist spirit. On May 21, 1796, while the household was preparing to retreat to Mount Vernon for the summer, Judge prepared her escape; she simply walked out of the house while the family was eating dinner. Her motivation was clear: complete freedom from slavery. Judge had learned that she would be given to Elizabeth Parke Custis upon Martha Washington's death. The promise of continued enslavement after the Washingtons' deaths cemented Judge's decision to risk her relatively comfortable position with the family and board a ship to Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Image
Runaway Advertisement for Oney Judge. The Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 24 May 1796.

In her first newspaper interview, printed in The Granite Freeman of Concord, New Hampshire on May 22, 1845, Judge was asked if she regretted her escape. She replied, "No, I am free, and have, I trust been made a child of God by the means." On two separate occasions, Judge was confronted by George Washington’s aides to return to Mount Vernon free of punishment. She refused, as she was still not guaranteed freedom after the deaths of George and Martha Washington. George Washington was offended by Judge's willingness to bargain with his aides and concluded that her disloyalty and ingratitude in running away should not ever be condoned by giving in to such demands.

Judge spent the remainder of her life living in New Hampshire, a fugitive but free, having evaded Washington's attempts at return. She took pride in teaching herself to read and write, which helped to introduce her to Christianity. Judge married freed person John Staines, with whom she had three children, two of whom died during her lifetime. Ona Judge died at age seventy-five, on February 25, 1848 in Greenland, New Hampshire. Attesting to the absurdities of the legal status of slaves, at the time of her death Ona Judge was still not legally a free person; she is not mentioned in Washington's 1799 will, and she and her children, though they were born in New Hampshire, remained property of the Custis estate.

_____________________________________________

Hercules
https://www.mountvernon.org/library/dig ... /hercules/
Chelsea Lenhart
George Washington University

Hercules, a member of the Mount Vernon enslaved community, became widely admired for his culinary skills displayed after George Washington's first retirement following the American Revolution. Washington appreciated Hercules' skills in the kitchen so much that he brought him from Mount Vernon to Philadelphia to live and work in the presidential household. Hercules, however, later ran away, one of the few instances of a member of Mount Vernon’s enslaved community successfully escaping during Washington's lifetime.

Hercules first appears in the historic record for the Mount Vernon Estate in George Washington's list of tithables (persons for whom taxes had to be paid) in 1770. Previous to his arrival at Mount Vernon, Hercules worked as a ferryman for Washington’s neighbor John Posey. In 1767, Hercules was mortgaged to Washington and became the ferryman at the Mansion House Farm for the Washingtons. Since slaves were first listed in tithable lists at age sixteen, Hercules was likely born sometime in or around 1754. Hercules was married to Alice, a Custis family dower slave owned by Martha Washington. The couple had three children during their marriage: Richmond (1777), Evey (1782), and Delia (1785). Although it is not known exactly when Hercules started working as a cook at Mount Vernon, the 1786 Mount Vernon slave census lists him as the chief cook at the Mansion House.

Hercules was one of nine slaves brought by George Washington to Philadelphia in 1790 to work in the President's House. Hercules' cooking was very much loved in the Washington household, and was "familiarly termed Uncle Harkless," according to Washington's step-grandson George Washington Parke Custis. Custis described Hercules as "a celebrated artiste . . . as highly accomplished a proficient in the culinary art as could be found in the United States."

Due to his culinary prowess, Hercules was able to bring his son Richmond, to Philadelphia. He was also given other special privileges not entitled to most of Washington's slaves. According to Custis, Hercules accrued a salary of "one to two hundred dollars a year," by selling leftovers, known as slops, from the presidential kitchen. Hercules was a "celebrated dandy," in the words of Custis, and the chef kept an equally meticulous kitchen: "Under his iron discipline, wo[e] to his underlings if speck or spot could be discovered on the tables or dressers, or if the utensils did not shine like polished silver."

Different accounts provide varying reasons for Hercules' decision to escape to freedom. In The Private Affairs of George Washington, Stephen Decatur Jr., the American naval hero and a descendant of Washington's secretary Tobias Lear, described Hercules as being so enamored by Philadelphia that when Washington left to return to Mount Vernon in 1797, Hercules chose to run away. Decatur notes that "although diligent inquiries were made for him, he was never apprehended."

However, other records indicate that Hercules escaped in early 1797, soon after being made a regular laborer at Mount Vernon instead of his usual chef duties. The Washingtons often returned their slaves to Mount Vernon from Philadelphia to circumvent a Pennsylvania law that allowed slaves to claim freedom after residing in the state for a minimum of six months. Weekly reports from Mount Vernon indicated that Hercules and other male house servants were put to work with the bricklayers and gardeners in early 1797. Hercules was most likely not needed in the kitchen at the time, due to a lack of visitors to Mount Vernon while George and Martha Washington lived in Philadelphia.

Washington was angered and confused by the decision to run away, believing that Hercules lived a privileged life, having even received three bottles of rum from Martha to "bury his wife" in September of 1787. On March 10, 1797, Washington expressed to Tobias Lear that he wanted Hercules to be found and returned to Mount Vernon, as soon as possible. Washington was so distressed by the absence of the family chef that he even wrote to Major George Lewis on November 13, 1797, about buying a slave in Fredericksburg who was reputed to be an excellent chef. Washington stated that while he "had resolved never to become the master of another slave by purchase," because of Hercules' absence, "this resolution I fear I must break."

Washington's last will and testament, written in July 1799 before his death that December, provided for the eventual emancipation, care, and education of his slaves, following the death of Martha Washington. However, he had no legal control over whether the Custis family dower slaves would gain their freedom. As a result, Hercules' wife and children remained enslaved, even after Martha Washington’s death in May 1802.
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Jul 29, 2018 6:45 pm, edited 6 times in total.

Rach3
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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by Rach3 » Sun Jul 29, 2018 5:54 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:43 pm
Most of us will not live long enough to witness historians judge him the worst president we've ever had, but that is what he is.

Agreed.

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:58 pm

jserraglio wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 5:26 pm
jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 3:43 pm
they have been a remarkably faithful bunch, starting with George Washington.
With his wife, George may have been practiced monumental discipline and restraint. With his favorite slaves, well, maybe not so much.

Ona Judge
https://www.mountvernon.org/library/dig ... /ona-judge
Sarah Pierson
George Washington University

Ona "Oney" Judge Staines served as personal servant to Martha Washington until she escaped from the President's Mansion in Philadelphia and relocated to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1796. Much is known of Judge's life in comparison to Washington's other slaves, as a result of newspaper interviews she gave in 1845 and 1847, as well as George Washington’s frustrated attempts to recover her after she ran away.

Born at Mount Vernon around 1773, Judge was the daughter of dower slave Betty and European-American tailor Andrew Judge. Like her mother, Judge was a skilled seamstress and by her own account was never taught to read or write while living at Mount Vernon, nor was she exposed to any religion. At age ten, Judge was incorporated into Mount Vernon's labor force, working in the Mansion. Always a personal favorite of Martha Washington's, Judge was one of the handful of slaves brought by George and Martha Washington to New York in 1789 and then to Philadelphia in 1790 at the start of the presidency. However, she was never kept in Pennsylvania for more than six months at a time to avoid establishing a legal residency that under Pennsylvania law (1780's An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery) would free her from enslavement.

Judge's escape from the President's Mansion in Philadelphia was most likely inspired and facilitated by her exposure to free blacks in a city with fervent abolitionist spirit. On May 21, 1796, while the household was preparing to retreat to Mount Vernon for the summer, Judge prepared her escape; she simply walked out of the house while the family was eating dinner. Her motivation was clear: complete freedom from slavery. Judge had learned that she would be given to Elizabeth Parke Custis upon Martha Washington's death. The promise of continued enslavement after the Washingtons' deaths cemented Judge's decision to risk her relatively comfortable position with the family and board a ship to Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Image
Runaway Advertisement for Oney Judge. The Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 24 May 1796.

In her first newspaper interview, printed in The Granite Freeman of Concord, New Hampshire on May 22, 1845, Judge was asked if she regretted her escape. She replied, "No, I am free, and have, I trust been made a child of God by the means." On two separate occasions, Judge was confronted by George Washington’s aides to return to Mount Vernon free of punishment. She refused, as she was still not guaranteed freedom after the deaths of George and Martha Washington. George Washington was offended by Judge's willingness to bargain with his aides and concluded that her disloyalty and ingratitude in running away should not ever be condoned by giving in to such demands.

Judge spent the remainder of her life living in New Hampshire, a fugitive but free, having evaded Washington's attempts at return. She took pride in teaching herself to read and write, which helped to introduce her to Christianity. Judge married freed person John Staines, with whom she had three children, two of whom died during her lifetime. Ona Judge died at age seventy-five, on February 25, 1848 in Greenland, New Hampshire. Attesting to the absurdities of the legal status of slaves, at the time of her death Ona Judge was still not legally a free person; she is not mentioned in Washington's 1799 will, and she and her children, though they were born in New Hampshire, remained property of the Custis estate.

_____________________________________________

Hercules
https://www.mountvernon.org/library/dig ... /hercules/
Chelsea Lenhart
George Washington University

Hercules, a member of the Mount Vernon enslaved community, became widely admired for his culinary skills displayed after George Washington's first retirement following the American Revolution. Washington appreciated Hercules' skills in the kitchen so much that he brought him from Mount Vernon to Philadelphia to live and work in the presidential household. Hercules, however, later ran away, one of the few instances of a member of Mount Vernon’s enslaved community successfully escaping during Washington's lifetime.

Hercules first appears in the historic record for the Mount Vernon Estate in George Washington's list of tithables (persons for whom taxes had to be paid) in 1770. Previous to his arrival at Mount Vernon, Hercules worked as a ferryman for Washington’s neighbor John Posey. In 1767, Hercules was mortgaged to Washington and became the ferryman at the Mansion House Farm for the Washingtons. Since slaves were first listed in tithable lists at age sixteen, Hercules was likely born sometime in or around 1754. Hercules was married to Alice, a Custis family dower slave owned by Martha Washington. The couple had three children during their marriage: Richmond (1777), Evey (1782), and Delia (1785). Although it is not known exactly when Hercules started working as a cook at Mount Vernon, the 1786 Mount Vernon slave census lists him as the chief cook at the Mansion House.

Hercules was one of nine slaves brought by George Washington to Philadelphia in 1790 to work in the President's House. Hercules' cooking was very much loved in the Washington household, and was "familiarly termed Uncle Harkless," according to Washington's step-grandson George Washington Parke Custis. Custis described Hercules as "a celebrated artiste . . . as highly accomplished a proficient in the culinary art as could be found in the United States."

Due to his culinary prowess, Hercules was able to bring his son Richmond, to Philadelphia. He was also given other special privileges not entitled to most of Washington's slaves. According to Custis, Hercules accrued a salary of "one to two hundred dollars a year," by selling leftovers, known as slops, from the presidential kitchen. Hercules was a "celebrated dandy," in the words of Custis, and the chef kept an equally meticulous kitchen: "Under his iron discipline, wo[e] to his underlings if speck or spot could be discovered on the tables or dressers, or if the utensils did not shine like polished silver."

Different accounts provide varying reasons for Hercules' decision to escape to freedom. In The Private Affairs of George Washington, Stephen Decatur Jr., the American naval hero and a descendant of Washington's secretary Tobias Lear, described Hercules as being so enamored by Philadelphia that when Washington left to return to Mount Vernon in 1797, Hercules chose to run away. Decatur notes that "although diligent inquiries were made for him, he was never apprehended."

However, other records indicate that Hercules escaped in early 1797, soon after being made a regular laborer at Mount Vernon instead of his usual chef duties. The Washingtons often returned their slaves to Mount Vernon from Philadelphia to circumvent a Pennsylvania law that allowed slaves to claim freedom after residing in the state for a minimum of six months. Weekly reports from Mount Vernon indicated that Hercules and other male house servants were put to work with the bricklayers and gardeners in early 1797. Hercules was most likely not needed in the kitchen at the time, due to a lack of visitors to Mount Vernon while George and Martha Washington lived in Philadelphia.

Washington was angered and confused by the decision to run away, believing that Hercules lived a privileged life, having even received three bottles of rum from Martha to "bury his wife" in September of 1787. On March 10, 1797, Washington expressed to Tobias Lear that he wanted Hercules to be found and returned to Mount Vernon, as soon as possible. Washington was so distressed by the absence of the family chef that he even wrote to Major George Lewis on November 13, 1797, about buying a slave in Fredericksburg who was reputed to be an excellent chef. Washington stated that while he "had resolved never to become the master of another slave by purchase," because of Hercules' absence, "this resolution I fear I must break."

Washington's last will and testament, written in July 1799 before his death that December, provided for the eventual emancipation, care, and education of his slaves, following the death of Martha Washington. However, he had no legal control over whether the Custis family dower slaves would gain their freedom. As a result, Hercules' wife and children remained enslaved, even after Martha Washington’s death in May 1802.
I happen to know all of this, and more. Hercules's daughter was asked if she missed her father and she replied, "Oh no, he's so much happier now that he is free." The British actually made an incursion on Mount Vernon during the Revolutionary War and liberated several of Washington's slaves, which he tried mightily but unsuccessfully to get back. He was not above forming a posse to recapture slaves. Then there is the famous story of Washington rotating his slaves from Pennsylvania back to Virginia so that they could not claim freedom.

Washington lived his retirement riding around his estate. He was reputed to be the greatest horseman of his time. He actually spent all day doing this, not just an hour or two. The second-greatest horseman was a slave who rode with him named, IIRC, Billy. In the end, Washington came around, however horrible the past had been. His adoptive family begged him not to free his slaves after Martha's death, because they represented wealth. Contrast this with Thomas Jefferson, who freed no slaves except his mistress Sally Hemings and her children by him.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

jserraglio
Posts: 4825
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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Mon Jul 30, 2018 3:16 am

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:58 pm
I happen to know all of this, and more . . . [Washington] was reputed to be the greatest horseman of his time. He actually spent all day doing this, not just an hour or two. The second-greatest horseman was a slave who rode with him named, IIRC, Billy. In the end, Washington came around, however horrible the past had been. His adoptive family begged him not to free his slaves after Martha's death, because they represented wealth.
Might not equestrian Billy have harbored some doubts about how welcome he really would be in horsey-set society? In one scenario, if he had been acquired as a Custis dower slave, he wouldn't have even qualified for freedom under the generous terms of Massa George's will.

So might MARCUS (the f.k.a. "Billy", in the advertisement printed below) be Billy, the horseman of whom you speak? In any event, a slave named 'Billy' but rechristened 'Marcus' by his devout Christian hosts so relished the lavishly slavish hospitality afforded to him by the Washingtons of Mount Vernon that said Billy/Marcus vamoosed from the premises first chance he got:

Image

This 'wanted poster' also hints at the fact that Martha, the former Mrs. Custis, freed George's slaves before she died. That may have been because she feared for her life in the hands of her husband's devoted servants. Possibly afraid they would knock her off to obtain their promised freedom under her estimable husband's will, she generously freed George's slaves before they took matters into their own hands.

Martha's own slaves, the ones she owned as a result of her prosperous match with first husband, Daniel Parke Custis? Well, they were not freed but passed on to her heirs even though in a process familiar to us today, families were separated (wife from husband, child from parent) b/c some had intermarried with George's now freed slaves.
jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:58 pm
Contrast this with Thomas Jefferson, who freed no slaves except his mistress Sally Hemings and her children by him.
Doesn't say a whole lot for GW to contrast him favorably with Thomas Jefferson. TJ not freeing any of his slaves except, and then only upon his death, his own children and their mother, Sally Hemings, the 14-year-old girl he had knocked up during the Revolutionary War or shortly thereafter. Their first 'love child' died in infancy, a slave, but at Monticello Sally Hemings was destined to present her master with several more slave babies.
And to call Hemings TJ's 'mistress' lends their relationship an aristocratic air of normality when in fact it was, shall-we-say, more "complicated".
Washington's behavior as a slave owner

Sources offer differing insight into Washington's behavior as a slave owner. On one end of the spectrum, Richard Parkinson, an Englishman who lived near Mount Vernon, once reported that "it was the sense of all his [Washington's] neighbors that he treated [his slaves] with more severity than any other man." Conversely, a foreign visitor traveling in America once recorded that George Washington dealt with the people he enslaved "far more humanely than do his fellow citizens of Virginia."What is clear is that Washington frequently utilized harsh punishment against the enslaved population, including whippings and the threat of particularly taxing work assignments. Perhaps most severely, Washington could sell a slave to a buyer in the West Indies, ensuring that the person would never see their family or friends at Mount Vernon again. Washington conducted such sales on several occasions. https://www.mountvernon.org/george-wash ... n-slavery/

Slave Control
In addition to having overseers monitoring work on site, George Washington utilized a number of methods to try to control the labor and behavior of the Mount Vernon slaves. Since work as a house servant or skilled laborer was viewed as higher-ranking than field work, Washington could threaten to demote an artisan who would be punished by becoming a field worker.

Violent coercive measures were used as well, including whippings and beatings. In some instances, physical restraints were utilized to ensure that slaves would not run away. When Tom, the slave foreman at River Farm, was sold in the West Indies in 1766 as a punishment for being "both a Rogue & Runaway," Washington wrote to the ship's captain to "keep him handcuffd till you get to Sea."

Although one houseguest noted in his journal that George Washington prohibited the use of whips on his slaves, evidence in the historical record proves otherwise. In 1758, Washington—while serving in the French and Indian War—received a letter from his farm manager explaining that he had "whipt" the carpenters when he "could see a fault." In 1793, farm manager Anthony Whiting reported that he had "gave…a very good Whiping" with a hickory switch to the seamstress Charlotte. The manager admitted that he was "determined to lower Spirit or skin her Back." George Washington replied that he considered the treatment of Charlotte to be "very proper" and that "if She, or any other of the Servants will not do their duty by fair means, or are impertinent, correction (as the only alternative) must be administered." Washington instituted a system of review in order to determine when he deemed physical abuse as a punishment. As described by Washington's secretary Tobias Lear, "no whipping is allowed without a regular complaint & the defendant found guilty of some bad deed."

If threats of demotion and whipping did not succeed in changing a slave's behavior, the ultimate form of punishment was to sell the individual away from the plantation. Slaves could be sold to a buyer in the West Indies, ensuring that the person would never see their family or friends at Mount Vernon again. George Washington resorted to such sales on several occasions. Washington seems to have believed, however, that less extreme methods could have a better effect than punishment and coercion. In one case, he reminded a manager that "admonition and advice" sometimes succeeded where "further correction" failed.
https://www.mountvernon.org/library/dig ... e-control/

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by Lance » Tue Aug 07, 2018 1:23 pm

Any updated news on this subject?
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Re: Cleveland Orch. suspends concertmaster William Preucil 1 day after WAPO reports on sex abuse in classical music

Post by jserraglio » Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:33 am

Lance wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 1:23 pm
Any updated news on this subject?
Preucil, distinguished professor of violin at the Cleveland Institute of Music, was forced to resign that position days after the Post story broke.

http://radio.wosu.org/post/after-miami- ... c#stream/0

AFAIK, the Orchestra continues its investigation while Preucil is suspended with pay, which totals over $500K/year.
Cleveland.com wrote: Letter to the Editor
There are plenty of good musicians who can replace Preucil

Aug 6 https://www.cleveland.com/letters/index ... music.html


I believe it is time for the Cleveland Orchestra to let go of concertmaster William Preucil. He has harassed people long enough. Mercifully he has resigned from CIM. He has had a long career while simultaneously making it impossible or difficult for his victims to do likewise. There are plenty of good musicians who can replace him (wouldn't it be poetic justice for him to be replaced by a woman) and who can bring to the position the honor & trust it deserves. The Cleveland Orchestra is a revered institution and it must live up to the regard in which it is held by never allowing rapacious, predatory persons to have anything to do with the sublime & serious pursuit of reaching peoples' souls through music.
Virginia Goetz,
Cleveland
Stories about Preucil have circulated in public since a 2007 Cleveland Scene article. Now those are resurfacing this summer wherever he is scheduled to perform:
Santa Fe New Mexican.com wrote: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/l ... 5aea0.html

A story published in the Cleveland Scene in 2007 presented a portrait of a musician and teacher whose behavior toward young women at the Cleveland Orchestra and Cleveland Institute of Music had long crossed a line.

Employees of the orchestra and institute thought “his comments are a bit too sexually charged for the teacher-student relationship,” the story said.

That article described a 2004 incident involving a female student who said Preucil, during a private rehearsal for a student-faculty recital, “overtly hit on the young woman, rubbing himself against her and making a lewd advance.”

Friends of the woman said she had reported the incident to the dean and president of the Cleveland Institute of Music, and the administration made her an offer: “In return for the woman’s silence, the school would transfer her to another teacher’s studio. At the end of the year, it would pay for her to audition and fly out to other music schools. It would also pay for her education at the school she chose.”

Preucil didn’t deny the allegations, the Cleveland Scene reported.

“In response to a question left on his answering machine, he sent an email that read: ‘With respect to your question regarding my work at CIM, I can only presume that the rumors you hear are based on an incident that occurred a few years ago when there was a dispute over the nature of an interaction I had with a student. The issue was fully reviewed by the institution and was resolved to everyone’s satisfaction.’ ”

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