What I listened to today

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:10 am


ContrapunctusIX
Posts: 971
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:09 pm
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Re: What I listened to today

Post by ContrapunctusIX » Sat Sep 01, 2018 8:49 am

John F wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 4:11 pm
ContrapunctusIX wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 3:06 pm
Shostakovich: string quartets
Borodin Quartet (stereo set, 1-15)

Not as well-recorded as the Decca Fitzwilliam set, but better musically. Working my way through the set in chronological order.
If you can get it, the original Borodin Quartet (with Rostislav Dubinsky, 1st violin) is best of all, I'd say, though it omits the quartets composed after Dubinsky emigrated. Kopelman is certainly a good player but not so special.
Thanks John, I’ll be sure to check that out. I believe I looked at it on amazon sometime back; it’s in mono, right?
Image

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:57 am

Wagner: Walkure III, scene 3 & Siegfried III complete 1985

Thomas Stewart (Wotan)
Ute Vinzing (Brunnhilde)
James King (Siegfried)
Christa Ludwig (Erda)

Vienna Philharmonic
cond. Leonard Bernstein
Last edited by jserraglio on Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:13 pm

Strauss: Elektra

Elektra - Astrid Varnay
Chrysothemis - Hildegard Hillebrecht
Clytemnestra - Martha Mödl
Aegisth - James King
Orest - Eberhard Wächter

Wiener Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan

Salzburg Festival August 17, 1964

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:51 am

jserraglio wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:57 am
Wagner: Walkure III, scene 3 & Siegfried III complete 1985

Thomas Stewart (Wotan)
Ute Vinzing (Brunnhilde)
James King (Siegfried)
Christa Ludwig (Erda)

Vienna Philharmonic
cond. Leonard Bernstein
James King's voice (and physique) were ideal for Siegfried, but this is his only performance of any part of that role. He also avoided Tristan, singing only Act 2 (with the conventional big cut) in concert at Indiana University. Most of his operatic roles were quite short, however demanding - Bacchus in "Ariadne auf Naxos" is typical. A good thing too, because as he said in a New York talk, he always sang his part complete with full voice on the day of the performance. :roll: For more about King's career and attitudes, see this interview:

http://www.bruceduffie.com/king.html
John Francis

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Sun Sep 02, 2018 6:58 pm

Today, Biber's Rosenkranz Sonaten 1-8. Love that scordatura!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mq-SrUZUluU

ContrapunctusIX
Posts: 971
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:09 pm
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Re: What I listened to today

Post by ContrapunctusIX » Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:23 pm

Beethoven: Late Quartets
Juilliard Quartet (60’s recording)
Sony

Image
Image

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:01 pm

Today I'm listening to my CD "Martha Argerich Live from The Concertgebouw 1978 and 1979". The CD includes the Scherzo #3 in C sharp Minor by Chopin; well, what a hurry she is in playing this piece. Argerich rushes over the poetic parts of the work and her concentration is on technique and bravura; many of the sections were just a blurr of notes. My experience with this pianist is that she's always in a hurry and has an appointment somewhere. Such a pity as this Scherzo is a charming work. The Bartok sonata is just bang bang. The only pieces I like on this CD are Ginastera "Danzas Argentinas", Op. 2. The Bach Partita No. 2 was pleasing also. Otherwise, a very mixed bag which didn't endear me to this musician one bit.

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Tue Sep 25, 2018 12:07 am

Just listening to MediciTV broadcast of Sunday night's concert with the National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Gianadrea Noseda. This piece was particularly stunning: Joshua Bell, violin.

Pablo de Sarasate, Carmen Fantasy Op. 25
Introduction and Habañera

And what delectable dishes are both conductor and soloist!!!

Then this stunning Credo by PENDERECKI:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1AeZOEA0TU

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:04 pm

I absolutely adore the Ravel String Quartet in F Major and am listening to it right now. Joy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieRQyyPowH0

What's not to absolutely love about Ravel?

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:22 pm

Penderecki, Concerto Grosso (for 3 Cellos):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDRsxm3HrNE

I sent my Polish physician friend the Penderecki 'Credo' because he dared me to find something "accessible" from this composer. He returned with "I hate it". I don't think he'd be too fond of the Concerto Grosso, though it does sound a little like Shostakovich (I agree with one of the U-tube comments).

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:06 am

What did you think of the violin concerto I recommended to you? (If you've listened to it.)
John Francis

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:00 am

John F wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:06 am
What did you think of the violin concerto I recommended to you? (If you've listened to it.)
I found it no more or less accessible than, say, Berg and it's the sort of work I see could myself appreciating more in the concert hall than at home on the hi-fi system (if that makes any sense). But I don't see myself owning a recording of it.

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:32 am

In the last 30 hours we have travelled about 800km round trip by car to see one of my husband's oldest friends who is dying of cancer. We arrived at the hospital at 11am today to find him in a deep coma, surrounded by family. On the way back home - a 6 plus hour trip - I listened to Beethoven Symphony #7. I found great consolation in that work and I felt empowered by its majesty. Last night I couldn't sleep at all so it was the "Hammerklavier". That will never put anybody to sleep.

In times of extreme stress and trouble I turn to Beethoven.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:34 am

2018 is turning out to be a bad year for our old friends. One of the library volunteers just lost his best friend to cancer, and my oldest friend - we go back nearly 60 years to college - is dying of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known in America as Lou Gehrig's Disease. We older ones had better make the most of our friendships while we still can.
John Francis

maestrob
Posts: 6251
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:14 am

John F wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:34 am
2018 is turning out to be a bad year for our old friends. One of the library volunteers just lost his best friend to cancer, and my oldest friend - we go back nearly 60 years to college - is dying of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known in America as Lou Gehrig's Disease. We older ones had better make the most of our friendships while we still can.
Totally agree. How sad for both of you. We just lost a close friend to complications from pneumonia of all things. He just didn't agree to go to the hospital in time. My sincerest condolences.

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:18 pm

You're always such a thoughtful person; thank you for your comment. I feel it's time to hug those near and dear as we slip closer towards our own eternity. Recently a close friend's son was killed instantly in a car accident (he was 39) and I wrote to her during one of our exchanges, "I wanted to tell you it was one of the best days of my life when I met you". I think we need to say this often to those friends we love, even if this is more problematic (for me) with family!!

When I was listening to the Beethoven I was thinking of the great man dying in that room in Schwarzpanierplatz in Vienna over a protracted number of days - without the aid of doctors, nursing staff and morphine!! Dreadful to contemplate.

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Wed Oct 24, 2018 11:31 pm

Today, the Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903 played by this magnificent pianist, Leon Fleisher. I find I just NEED music of this complexity and originality more and more with each passing day!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdCf2dSTvMo

maestrob
Posts: 6251
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:45 am

Belle wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 11:31 pm
Today, the Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903 played by this magnificent pianist, Leon Fleisher. I find I just NEED music of this complexity and originality more and more with each passing day!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdCf2dSTvMo
Thanks for that, Belle! After I finish Pogorelich, this is next. 8)

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Tue Oct 30, 2018 2:46 pm

Richard Wagner: TRISTAN und ISOLDE

Spas Wenkoff (Tristan)
Catarina Ligendza (Isolde)
Yvonne Minton (Brangäne)
Donald McIntyre (Kurwenal)
Karl Ridderbusch (Marke)
Herbert Steinbach (Melot)
Heinz Zednik (Junger Seemann & Hirte)
Heinz Feldhoff (Steuermann)


Chor und Orchester der Bayreuther Festspiele
Carlos Kleiber

30.07. 1976, live, STEREO, Festspielhaus, Bayreuth
from the Bavarian Radio.

I think this live performance sounds better than Kleiber's DG studio recording with the DSKO which I also own, and the cast is good. I burned this b'cst to one DVD-R so I could listen straight thru. I like Carlos Kleiber's conducting.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:59 pm

The Kleiber studio recording involved many, many recording sessins stretching over years. Amazing that it holds together at all. The Bayreuth Festival performance you're listening to, from a single broadcast, is much better.
John Francis

Wallingford
Posts: 4545
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Thu Nov 01, 2018 6:11 pm

This isn't today, but rather the LPs I listened to the past few weeks, using the old cartridge and saving the new cartridge for some fresh, unopened vinyl:

Weber's Oberon and Der Freischutz Overtures, and Smetana's Moldau (Szell, NYP)
Tchaikovsky's Symphony #4 (Koussevitzky)
Gershwin's Cuban Overture and "I Got Rhythm" Variations (Fiedler)
Kodaly's Hary Janos Suite (Toscanini)
Debut! (full album of Henry Mancini pieces, played by him with the Philadelphia Orchestra)
Bartok Mikrkosmos excerpts (played by his widow, Ditta-Pasztory Bartok)
Handel Water Music excerpts (Van Beinum)
Mozart's Piano Concert #27 (Casadesus/Szell)
Schubert's Symphony #1 (Leibowitz)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 18048
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Lance » Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:35 am

And what, out of this group, captured your musical heart the most?
Wallingford wrote:
Thu Nov 01, 2018 6:11 pm
This isn't today, but rather the LPs I listened to the past few weeks, using the old cartridge and saving the new cartridge for some fresh, unopened vinyl:

Weber's Oberon and Der Freischutz Overtures, and Smetana's Moldau (Szell, NYP)
Tchaikovsky's Symphony #4 (Koussevitzky)
Gershwin's Cuban Overture and "I Got Rhythm" Variations (Fiedler)
Kodaly's Hary Janos Suite (Toscanini)
Debut! (full album of Henry Mancini pieces, played by him with the Philadelphia Orchestra)
Bartok Mikrkosmos excerpts (played by his widow, Ditta-Pasztory Bartok)
Handel Water Music excerpts (Van Beinum)
Mozart's Piano Concert #27 (Casadesus/Szell)
Schubert's Symphony #1 (Leibowitz)
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Wallingford
Posts: 4545
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:17 am

Lance wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:35 am
And what, out of this group, captured your musical heart the most?
Wallingford wrote:
Thu Nov 01, 2018 6:11 pm
This isn't today, but rather the LPs I listened to the past few weeks, using the old cartridge and saving the new cartridge for some fresh, unopened vinyl:

Weber's Oberon and Der Freischutz Overtures, and Smetana's Moldau (Szell, NYP)
Tchaikovsky's Symphony #4 (Koussevitzky)
Gershwin's Cuban Overture and "I Got Rhythm" Variations (Fiedler)
Kodaly's Hary Janos Suite (Toscanini)
Debut! (full album of Henry Mancini pieces, played by him with the Philadelphia Orchestra)
Bartok Mikrkosmos excerpts (played by his widow, Ditta-Pasztory Bartok)
Handel Water Music excerpts (Van Beinum)
Mozart's Piano Concert #27 (Casadesus/Szell)
Schubert's Symphony #1 (Leibowitz)
TheToscanini Kodaly always impressed me with its cleanness and its immaculetteness; it can easily rival any modern-day performance. And I like the Bartok very much, though this was a Qualiton recording leased to the cheapie budget label, Mace; there was always this post-echo coming from the right channel in the wake of the last chord struck by Madame Bartok.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:12 pm

John F wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:59 pm
The Kleiber studio recording involved many, many recording sessins stretching over years. Amazing that it holds together at all. The Bayreuth Festival performance you're listening to, from a single broadcast, is much better.
I've found this poor quality image of Carlos Kleiber in the pit for rehearsals at Bayreuth with "Tristan und Isolde" - this opera performed at the time of my wedding in 1974!! So long ago now (sigh). What an inspirational man Carlos Kleiber was and how very much missed by me he remains. (I remember where I was and exactly what I was doing when I heard on the radio that he'd died!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbdSmDmkcIc

I hope the recording quality from these performances, discussed on this thread, is much better than what we get from the secretly-recorded pit camera!

Anyway, there's still this!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta8Tqjn7Suo

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Tue Nov 20, 2018 5:30 am


jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Nov 22, 2018 6:05 am

Kubelik conducts Beethoven Symphonies DG

Image

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:57 am

Puccini: Il Trittico de Billy-Met 2018 broadcast

Handel: Teseo (arr Jacobs) Jacobs/Academy of Ancient Music, Berlin 2018 Vienna live

Image

Wallingford
Posts: 4545
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:49 pm

These past two weeks I’ve been celebrating the installation of a new cartridge by trying it out on a pile of unplayed vinyl….stuff I’ve had over the decades and never played. There’re two Murray Hill sets of Mozart, and my near-complete Time-Life Great Men of music series. The latter include LPs I’ve had over four decades—I never listened to the complete sets when I received them. I’d generally leave out chamber music and vocal/choral works. So I’ve been hearing now:

Bach’s Mass in b excerpts (Shaw)
Berlioz’ Les nuits d’ete (Price/Reiner)
Mozart’s Quartet #15 (Guarneri Qt.)
Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte exerpts (Price, Raskin, Troyance, Milnes, Leinsdorf, Philharmonia Orch., Ambrosian Opera Chor.)
Haydn's Harmoniemesse (Marriner)
Prokofiev’s Violin Conc. #1 (Friedman/Leinsdorf)
Beethoven’s “Razmovsky” Qrt. (Guarneri Qt.)
Sibelius/ Violin Conc. (Perlman/Leinsdorf)
Sibelius’ Sym. #2 (Ormandy 3)
Wagner’s Gotterdammerung finale (Flagstad/Munch)
Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll (Monteux)
Mendelssohn’s Violin Conc. (Laredo/Munch)
Mendelssohn’s Italian Sym. (Munch)
Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream excerpts (Martinon)
Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture (Reiner)
Mendelssohn’s Capriccio Brillant (Graffman/Munch)

All are drawn, you might’ve guessed, from RCA’s Red Seal catalog.

The reason this list is so “Mendelssohn-heavy” is that that volume was still unopened….got it recently on ebay at an irresistible price.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Dec 03, 2018 12:29 am


On Sunday, November 2, 2018, I listened to two CDs.
 
1. Frank Bridge (1879-1941): CD 3 of 6 in a set titled "Bridge Orchestral Works." |Tr. 1. Coronation March, H97 (1911) (6'19) (world premiere recording) |Tr. 2. Summer, H 116 (1915) (10'42) |Tr. 3. Phantasm for piano and orchestra, H 182 (1931) (24'21) |Tr. 4. There is a Willow Gros aslant a Brook II. 173 (1927) (11'19) |Tr.. 5-7. Vignettes de danse, H. 166 (1938) (11'21) |Tr. 8. Sir Roger de Coverley (A Christmas Dance), H. 155 (1922) (premiere recording of this version) (4'41)--Howard Shelley, piano (Tr.3), Richard Hickox, cond., BBC Symphony Orchestra of Wales. TT: 69'51)--CHANDOS.--Rec. NOV 2000-OCT 2004.
 
 
2. Sergei Taneyev (1856-1915): CD 1 of 2. |Tr. 1-3. John of Damascus, cantata for chorus and orchestra, Op. 1 (based on the poem of the same name by A. K. Tolstoy) (25'20)--rec. 1991. |Tr. 4-7. Symphony 4 in C Minor, Op. 12 (41'10)--rec. 1988--Evgeny Svetlanov, cond. USSR State Academy Symphony Orchestra, Academic Choir of the USSR All-Union Radio (Tr. 1-3) Melodiya.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Belle
Posts: 1932
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:45 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Dec 10, 2018 6:49 pm

Today, as I'm preparing a dinner here for 6, I'm listening to the Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 2 in E and what a magnificent work it is. That whole sound world appeals to me.

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Fri Dec 14, 2018 11:54 pm


On Friday, 14 DEC 2018, I listened to the following:
 
1. Tahra 187, CD 3 of a set of 5. Hermann Scherchen, cond. a) J.S. Bach: Prelude & Fugue in E Flat Major (17'56)--Orchester des Hessischen Rundfunks, 2 FEB 1960. b) Arnold Schoenberg: Symphonie de Chambre 1, Op. 9 (20'51), Orchestre de la Radio Suedoise {tr. Radio Sweden], 6 NOV 1955. c) Ernest Krenek: Symphony 1 in one movement, Op. 7 (31'07), Orchestre and date of recording unknown (31'07).
 
The Krenek is the most impressive work here. Although the date of the recording is unknown, it is of a piece, with, perhaps, even a little better sound than the others, so it, in my judgment, has to come from the 1950's at the earliest, and probably from the 1960's. The Bach is, of course, an orchestration of an organ work, and the Schoenberg is an early work from his tonal period. The Krenek, however, is a mature work.
 
2. W.A. Mozart: Tr. 1-3. Piano Concerto 26 in D Major, K. 537 "Coronation" (29'00) |Tr. 4-6. Piano Concerto 27 in B Flat Major, K. 595 (30'06)--Robert Casadesus, piano, George Szell, cond. Columbia Symphony Orchestra. Rec. Severance Hall Cleveland, OH, 2-3 NOV 1962 (1-3) & 4 NOV 1962. CD 3 in a 5 CD SONY set titled "Robert Casadesus plays Mozart."
 
These are, of course, among the most elegant and stylish recordings of these works by a non-OIP orchestra ever committed to disc. These performers are too well known to most who will be reading this to need further description.
 
3-4. Cds 1-2 of a 23 CD set titled "Leopold Stokowski: Complete Decca Phase 4 stereo recordings." CD1 is a potpourri titled "Great music for chorus and orchestra with the New Symphony Orch. of London and the Norman Luboff Choir. It contains two traditional religious songs, Deep River & Praise God from whom all blessings flow. All the others are extracts from larger works, including the Pilgrim's Chorus from Tannhauser. 11 tracks, all told, totalling 52'24. CD 2, with the LSO and Erich Gruenberg, violin, is of Rimsky Korsakov's Scheherazade (45'47), rec. 22 SEP 1964.
 
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sat Dec 15, 2018 3:04 am

Casadesus's recording of the coronation concerto is his best Mozart, I'd say. Elegance is not at all what I want in K.595 but rather depth of feeling, especially in the slow movement; my choice is Curzon/Britten, with any number of others too (Serkin, Schnabel); Casadesus isn't even in the running in this concerto.
Last edited by John F on Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
John Francis

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:45 am

Image

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Sun Dec 16, 2018 12:29 am


On Saturday, December 15, 2018, I listened to the following:
 
1) CD 7 of 10 containing the complete works of Arcangelo Corelli (1655-1715): Sonatas for vioin and cello with cembalo, Op. 5, #s 1-6 (Rome, 1700) (63'34)--Brilliant Classics. Remy Baudet, violin, Jaap ter Linden, cello, Mike Fentross, therobo, Pieter-Jan Belder, harpsichord.
 
Stylish, superb recordings. Highly recommended.
 
2) CD 1 of 5. Jan Sibelius (1865-1957): Tr. 1-4. Symphony 1 in E Minor, Op. 39 (36'13) |Tr. 5-8. Symphony 2 in D Major, Op. 43 (39'50) TT: 76'21. {Paavo Berglund, Helsinki Philharmonic Orch. Rec. Culture Hall, Helsinki 1986. #1 (May), # 2 (DEC). Warner Classics.
 
This, I believe, was Paavo Berglund's third and last complete set of the Sibelius symphonies. Unlike the others, it includes, on Disc 5, a recording of the early, unnumbered Kullervo Symphony, a work for orchestra and chorus. On this CD, he acquits himself well, but not as well as Colin Davis and a few others. The last two movements of the Second Symphony are especially stirring here, and rise above the general quality of the performances of the other movements.
 
3) CD 2 of 14 Decca box of Mono Recordings by Arthur Grumiaux. Mozart Violin Concerti: Tr 1-3. VC 1 in B Flat, K. 207 (17'41) |Tr. 4-6. VC 2 in D, K. 211 (18'53) |Tr. 7-9. VC 5 in A, K. 219 (27'09)--Bernhard Oaumgartner, Wiener Symphoniker. Rec. 5/1955 (Tr. 1-3), 10/1954 (Tr. 4-9). TT: 64'06.
 
Wonderful stylish performances, with excellent and complicated cadenzas.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:46 pm


On Sunday, 16 DEC 2018, I listened to the following:
 
1) CD 4 of a 6 CD Chandos set of the complete orchestral works of Frank Bridge (1879-1941). Tr. 1. Rebus, H 191 (1940), Overture for orchestra (10'44) |Tr. 2. Ovation (Concerto elegiaco), H. 180 (1929-30) for solo cello & orchestra (29'17) |Tr. 3. Allegro moderato, H. 192 (1940-1), fragment of a symphony for string orchestra (Ed. by Anthony Pople) (13'24) |Tr. 4. Lament, H. 117 (1915) for string orchestra in memory of Catherine, age 9, who died on the Lusitania, 1915. |Tr. 5. A Prayer, H. 140 (1916-18) for chorus and orchestra (17'55) (Text from Thomas a Kempis's "Imitation of Christ," Book 3, Chapter 15. TT: 77'01. Richard Hickox, cond., BBC National Orchestra (and Chorus in Tr. 5) of Wales, Adrian Partington, chorus master (in Tr. 5).
 
2) Sergei Taneyev (1856-1915): Tr. 1-5. Concert suite for viollin & orchestra in G Minor, Op. 28 (44'38)--Andrey Korsakov, violin |Tr. 6. Temple of Apollo at Delphi, entr'acte before Scene 2, Act III of the musical trilogy Orestia, based on the tragedy by Aeschylus (5'56)--Evgeny Svetlanov, cond, USSR State Academy Symphony Orchestra. Perf. in the Grand Hall of the Moscow Conservatory 1990 (Tr. 1-5), broadcast from above venue 28 DEC 1984 (Tr. 6). CD 2 of a 2 CD Melodiya set.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Dec 17, 2018 5:57 am

The more I hear of Taneyev's music, the more highly I think of his achievement. The first of his works to appear in American record stores was the Concert Suite, in a fine performance by David Oistrakh, and while western violinists haven't taken it up - maybe it's too long and too unfamiliar to fit into our concert programs - nearly every important Russian violinist has played and recorded it. This is the second movement, a gavotte.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf4mOEGqj2M
John Francis

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Thu Dec 20, 2018 3:32 am


On Wednesday, December 19, 2018, I only had time to listen to 1--count them, 1 CD. And it was a short one, too, only 33'47 long--
 
Mussorgsky-Stokowski: Tr. 1-8. Pictures at an Exhibition (27'11) |Tr. 9. Debussy: La Cathedrale engloutie (The Submerged Cathedral) (Preludes, Book 1: #10 of 12, orchestrated by Stokowski) (6'36)--Leopold Stokowski, cond., New Philharmonia Orch. Rec. Kingsway Hall, London, rec. 10-11, 15, 25 SEP 1966. CD 3 of a 23 CD set titled "Stokowski's complete DECCA Phase 4 recordings."
 
I looked up the title of the Debussy work, which is translated at "The Engulfed Cathedral" in the accompanying notes, but which Wikipedia says is more properly translated as "The Submerged Cathedral." It is a piece of program music. From Wikipedia:

"This piece is based on an ancient Breton myth in which a cathedral, submerged underwater off the coast of the Island of Ys, rises up from the sea on clear mornings when the water is transparent. Sounds can be heard of priests chanting, bells chiming, and the organ playing, from across the sea. Accordingly, Debussy uses certain harmonies to allude to the plot of the legend, in the style of musical symbolism."


For more information, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_cath%C ... _engloutie

Pictures is obviously the main draw here. For more information, read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pictures_at_an_Exhibition

This is, of course, not the usual Ravel orchestration, but Stokowski's own. I also own the LP version of this, although I haven't listened to it in ages. I remember that version as one of massive chords, and little subtlety. I didn't like it as much as the Ravel orchestration, though my favorite orchestration was of a modern Russian version (I forget the arranger) I heard performed in a Cleveland Orchestra concert broadcast sometime in the 1970's or 80's, I think it was. It was much more subdued, and did not have the grand climax at the end when the Great Gate of Kiev is portrayed. But it sounded much more authentically Russian, and one could imagine it being played by a chamber ensemble at an actual exhibition of paintings, even though it was originally, of course, a work for solo piano.
I like this version a lot better on rehearing than I did originally. The Tuilleries section is missing, but is otherwise a sympathetic and dynamic performance.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Thu Dec 20, 2018 4:02 am

RebLem wrote:favorite orchestration was of a modern Russian version (I forget the arranger)
Gorchakov? Kurt Masur used that one instead of Ravel at the New York Philharmonic.
John Francis

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Dec 21, 2018 4:45 pm

Wagner Gotterdammerung & Walkure Keilberth/Bayreuth

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Dec 22, 2018 6:09 am

Image

Mozart Magic Flute Bicket-Met December 19, 2018 [1-act version in English]

Image

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sun Dec 23, 2018 9:42 am

Previn, Mercer & Harwood: The Good Companions (1974)

Susie Dean ........... Annalene Beechey
Jerry Jerningham ........... Stuart Matthew Price
Jimmy Nunn ........... John Arthur
Morton Mitcham ........... Paul Bentley
Inigo Jollifant ........... Mark Meadows
Elizabeth Trant ........... Liz Robertson
Jess Oakroyd ........... Ian Talbot
Mr Joe Brundit ........... Graham Stone
Mrs Joe Brundit ........... Sharon Eckman Elsie
Longstaffe ........... Kimberley Akester The Maida Vale

Singers & BBC Concert Orchestra
John Wilson, conductor

BBC Radio 3
Broadcast: 16 November 2009
Recorded: November 5/6 2009
Presented by Petroc Trelawny

Image

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Dec 24, 2018 11:11 am

Image

Lois Marshall, Soprano
Mary Palmateer, Contralto
Jon Vickers, Tenor
James Milligan, Bass

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir & Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Sir Ernest MacMillan
1952 Beaver Records LTD/1962 reissue World Record Club

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Tue Dec 25, 2018 8:13 am

Alfred Burt's Carols

Image

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:00 am

​On Sunday, 30 DEC 2018, I listened to 5 CDs:


1) Tahra 188, CD 4 of 5 in a set titled "Hommage a Hermann Scherchen", featuring performances led by said conductor. |Tr. 1. Hector Berlioz (1803-69): Les Troyens a Carthage: Ballet from Act 1 (8'37)--Paris Conservatory Orch., May, 1952. |Tr. 2. Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901): Nabucco Overture (7'30)--Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie Herford, 3 JUN 1960 |Tr. 3. Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953): Lieustenant Kije, Op. 60 (20'56)--South German RSO, 26 OCT 1962 |Tr. 4-7. Vassily Kalinnikov (1866-1901): Symphony 1 (35'46)--Czech Philharmonic, 5 JUNE 1951.


A potpourri here, each work performed by a different orchestra. The one thing they have in common is that none of the composers is German, but instead we have a French, an Italian, and two Russian composers, all well performed.
The Berlioz and Verdi pieces are well played, but are mere preludes to the last two works, which form the real meat of the CD. Prokofiev's comedy is not lost on Scherchen. It proceeds at a steady and jaunty pace, and one can almost imagine an old slapstick comic actor like Charlie Chaplin or Ben Turpin playing Kije. The first theme of the Kalinnikov may have provided the inspiration for the main theme of Kije, but it quckly moves into dominant themes of a much more serious character. The third movement is much cheerier than the first two, moving along at a jaunty pace, and the last movement is a reallly stirring rouser, rivalling anything Mahler has to offer. It will have you jumping to your feet and applauding. This symphony is generally considered Kalinnikov's greatest work. At Tchaikovsky's recommendation, he was appointed main conductor of the Maly Theater in Moscow and late the Italian Theater there, but his tuberculosis forced him to resign. He moved to Yalta in the Crimea and lived there until his death January 11, 1901, just two days before what would have been his 35th birthday.


2. CD 4 of a set of 5 SONY CDs entitled "Robert Casadeus plays Mozart." |Tr. 1-3. Piano Concerto 15 in B Flat Major, K. 450 (22'07) |Tr. 4-6. Piano Concerto 17 in G Major, K. 453 (30'30) |Tr. 7-9. Piano Sonata 12 in F Major, K. 332 (300k) (14'15). George Szell, cond., Cleveland Orch., 20 OCT 1968 (Trs. 1-6), Columbia 30th St Studio, NYC, 20 OCT 1964 (Tr. 7-9).


Superb playing here all the way around. The only rivals, IMHO, the Casadesus/Szell collaboration have in these two concerti is from the superb performances by Peter Serkin and Alexander Schneider in their set of the Concerti 14-18 with the English Chamber Orch. And, the middle movement of #17 is my #1 personal favorite Mozart slow movement.


3. CD 8 in a set of 10 Brilliant Classics CDs of the complete works of Arcangelo Corelli (1655-1713). Sonate for violin, cello, & cembalo, Op 5, Part 2 (Rome, 1700): |Tr. 1-4. 7 in D Minor (8'29) |Tr. 5-8. 8 in E Minor (12'15) |Tr. 9-12. 9 in A Major (9'37) |Tr. 13-17. 10 in F Major (8'54) |Tr. 18-22. 11 in E Major (7'52) |Tr. 23. "La Folia" (10'57)--Musica Amphion, (Remy Baudet, violin, Jaap ter Linden, cello, Mike Fentoss, theorbo & guitar, Pieter-Jan Belder, harpsichord, director).


This album is of a piece with the previous volumes in this series. This is beautiful music which falls in that interregnum between the Renaissance and the Baroque, out of space and out of time, endlessly inventive, timeless and sublime. Corelli is, in my opinion, a much underrated composer.


4. CD 2 of 5 Warner Classics CDs featuring the complete symphonies (+ selected other works) by Jean Sibelius (1865-1957). |Tr. 1-3. Symphony 3 in C Major, Op. 52 (1907) (28'36)--rec. Helsinki Culture Hall, 24-26 AUG 1987 |Tr. 4-7. Symphony 4 in A Minor, Op. 63 (1911) (34'12)--rec. London, UK, Tooting All Saints Church, FEB 1984. Paavo Berglund, cond. Helsinki Philharmonic.


These symphonies are probably Sibelius's least known and least popular symphonies, but I find them interesting, especially the third. The second movement of the third has a jaunty, martial theme whose development is uncomplicated and easily understood and followed. It would be a good movement for beginners to listen to to begin to understand what happens in a symphonic movement.
The Fourth Symphony is a much more forbidding work. Sibelius's doctors had found a life threatening tumor in his throad, and it seems depressive and filled with forboding. Although he was cured, he, of course, didn't know that would happen while he was composing the work, and add to that that his family responsibilities were increasing, as his fourth child was born soon afterward. It was not received well initially, but it seemed premonitory after WWI, and so then it became a bit more popular.


5. CD 3 of a 14 CD DECCA set of the complete MONO recordings of Arthur Grumiaux, violin. |W.A. Mozart (1756-91): |Tr. 1-3. Violin Concerto 3 in G Major, K. 216 (21'56) |Tr. 4-6. Violin Concerto 4 in D Major, K. 218 (22'23) |Tr. 7-9. Violin Concerto in D, K. 271a--Wiener Phil, Rudolf Moralt, cond. (Tr. 1-6),rec. NOV, 1953. Bernhard Paumgartner, cond. ((Tr. 7-9), rec. MAY, 1955. All rec. in Wien.


# 3 is my favorite of the Mozart Violin Concerti. Its themes seem more substantive and melodic than some of these in the other VCs. These are excellent performances.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
Posts: 20712
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Dec 31, 2018 4:21 am

RebLem wrote:Hector Berlioz (1803-69): Les Troyens a Carthage: Ballet from Act 1 (8'37)--Paris Conservatory Orch., May, 1952.
This is presumably taken from the complete recording of LTAC, published in the US on Westminster in 1952. I believe the recording was made by the French label Ducretet-Thomson. For many years this was all we could hear of the opera other than the Royal Hunt and Storm and the scene of Énée's departure sung by Georges Thill. We had to wait until 1970 for the first complete recording of the whole opera, indeed of any Berlioz opera.

The all-French cast is mediocre except for Xavier Depraz as Narbal and André Dran in the tiny role of Hylas, and the recording received lukewarm to chilly reviews; apart from Scherchen there's nothing notable about it. Not surprisingly perhaps, the Colin Davis recording has no French singers other than Roger Soyer again as Narbal. As for Scherchen, as far as I know this is the only time he conducted any of this music; in the 1950s, Westminster was building up repertoire by recording him in everything except his real métier, music of the 2nd Viennese School.
John Francis

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:51 am

Image

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:56 pm


On New Years Eve, 2018, I listened to 5 CDs, and wrote about them in a WORDPAD document, as is my regular practice. I spent hours writing it, and then, I went over all of it to copy it, so I could post it, first on my FB page and then on the two classical music sites where I post all my listening reports. Just at that point, when I was about 10-15 seconds away from getting it posted on my FB page, the power went out. Everything in the house that was electric stopped. PNM does that to my neighborhood a lot. I lost all of my hard work to the ether. I started to write a briefer statement, but after about five minutes, the power went out once again, and this time I lost internet. I could write a WORDPAD document, but I couldn't post it any place. So, I just gave up for the night and turned the computer off.
 
 
I don't have it in me to reconstruct the whole thing. So I thought I would do a briefer statement without all the formal headnote on each CD.
 
 
The first CD I listened to was CD 5 of a 6 CD set of some of the orchestral music of Frank Bridge on CHANDOS, Richard Hickox conducting the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, with Roderick Williams, baritone, featured in 3 of the selections. Three of the pieces were world premiere recordings. I found them to be sort of standard, late romantic music, pleasant, but not, to me, terribly inspiring. Much of it could serve well as background movie music.
 
 
I actually listened to only four issues, but one of them was a 2 CD set. That was a performance of Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio from the 1956 Salzburg Festival conducted by the redoubtable George Szell. Wiener Phil and Chorus. One of the characters I found rather controversial, Hannsgeorg Laubenthal, who had the speaking role of Pasha Selim, whose jail holds Belomonte's beloved Konstanze. Mr. Laubenthal had also appearedin "Die Rothschilds," a 1940 German antisemitic and anti British propaganda film about the famous Jewish-British financier-banker family. In addition to him Erika Koth appears as Konstanze, Rudolf Schock as Belmonte, Lisa Otto as Blonde, Konstanze's servant, and Murray Dickie is Pedrillo, Belmonte's ervant. Kurt Bohme appears as Osmin, the jailer. A very fine performance before a live audience, and the comedic acting, judging from the audience reaction, was quite effective. Its on Melodram, a label which specializes in recordings from, shall we say, unofficial sources, and the sound is not up to the standards one expects from official sources from 1956. The accompanying booklet has five pages of notes on the actors, but is otherwise uncommunicative. I remember the whole thing lasted just a couple minutes over 2 hours.
 
 
The third issue, and the fourth CD I listened to was CD 4 from Leopold Stokowski's Complete Decca Phase 4 recordings, of excerpts from two Tchaikovsky ballets: Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty, recorded Sept 1965 with the New Philharmonia Orch. I do remember my short commentary on this issue:
Once you have heard those three things: Stokowski, Tchaikovsky, Phase 4, what more do you need to know? Its all there. Magnificent, glorious excess. Guilty pleasures abound, especially if you have, as I do, a near state of the art playback system.
 
 
And finally, we have the last volume, Tahra 189, of a 5 CD set titled "Hommage a Hermann Scherchen." Two composers featured here. One is a 33'13 excerpt from Schoenberg's Moses und Aron called The Danse Around the Golden Calf, probably the most Bacchanalian excerpt from the opera. 5 soloists listed, and its with the Chorus & Orchestra of the Landestheater de Darmstadt, recorded 2 JULY 1951. The other work is Bartok's 28'46 Music for Strings, Percussion, & Celesta with the Orchestre de la Radio Suedoise, 23 OCT 1954.
 
Both these works are well performed and well recorded, albeit a little too closely and at a high volume. I had to calibrate the volume of my playback down a couple notches below my usual settings, as they are much too closely miked. But they are good, clear performances, highly recommendable.
 
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:14 pm


On New Years Day, 2019, I listened to 2 CDs.
 
 
1. CD 5 of a 5 CD SONY set "Robert Casadesus plays Mozart." |Tr. 1-3. Concerto for two pianos & orchestra in E Flat Major, K. 365 (316a) (23'07)--Robert & Gaby Casadesus, duo pianists, Eugene Ormandy, cond., The Philadelphia Orch.--rec. Manhattan Center, NYC, 15 DEC 1960 |Tr. 4-6. Concerto for three pianos and orchestra in F Major, K. 242--Robert, Gaby, & Jean Casadeus, trio pianists, Eugene Ormandy, Philadelphia Orchestra, rec. Philadelphia Athletic Club 9 DEC 1962. |Tr. 7-9. Qunitet for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn, & bassoon in E Flat Major, K. 452--Robert Casadesus, piano, Philadelphia Woodwind Quintet members (John De Lancie, oboe, Anthony Gigliotti, clarinet, Mason Jones, French horn, Bernard Garfield, bassoon--rec. 16 NOV 1963. TT: 67'13.
 
The double concerto is mid-period Mozart, the triple a tad earlier, and the quintet is close to late period Mozart. So, we have a range here, from a rather immature style in the triple, to his more sophisticated later music in the quintet. As such, its a good reflection of his development as a composer. Specifically, the Triple is from 1776, a year it is easy to remember for some reason; it is his pc # 7. The Double is #10 and is from 1779, and the quintet is from 1784.
 
 
2. Arcangelo Corelli (1655-1713): 12 Concerti Grossi, Op. 6, #s 1-7. |Tr. 1-5. #1 in D Major (12'30) |Tr. 6-10. #2 in F Major (10'42) |Tr. 11-15. #5 in C Minor (10'57) |Tr. 16-19. #4 in D Major (12'09) |Tr. 20-24. #5 in B Flat Major (10'32) |Tr. 25-29. #6 in F Major (11'08) |Tr. 30-34. #7 in D Major (8'55)-- (Remy Baudet & Sayuri Yamagata, violins, Albrt Bruggen cello, & Musica Anphion, Pieter-Jan Belder, directing from the harpsichord. Recording date and place unknown, but it seems of recent vintage. This is CD 9 of a 10 CD set by these forces of the Complet Works of Arcangelo Corelli on Brilliant Classics.
 
Words fail me when I try to describe this music and the feeling of peace and universality it imparts. I repeat what I said in my last report of CD 8 in the set--Arcangelo Corelli is a great and much underrated composer, and you are cheating yourself if you don't become more familiar with his work, all of which is in this inexpensive 10 CD set in superb performances. The last volume, to come, is obviously of the same opus #, mostly, just #s 8-12, plus a couple works without opus numbers.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
Posts: 5607
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:22 pm

Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 24 guests