What I listened to today

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Aug 03, 2019 4:50 am

John F wrote:
Fri Aug 02, 2019 8:39 pm
Image

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sun Aug 04, 2019 6:07 am


maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:31 am

I just listened to that yesterday! A stunning recording, in excellent sound, done to perfection. Carol Neblitt's agent who discovered her was a client of mine during ethe 1980's (He and his wife had retired to live in the Dominican Republic of all things, and they used to stay at the NYAC when they came to town). He was very bitter about Neblett who left him when she achieved success, and told tales I won't repeat here.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Aug 07, 2019 3:34 pm

From an oop ASdisc CD

Götterdämmerung, act III (complete)

2. Frau Sonne sendet lichte Strahlen 6:05
3. Ein Albe führte mich irr 19:55
4. MIme hieß ein mürrischer Zwerg 9:07
5. Brünnhilde, heilige Braut! 3:55
6. Orchesterzwischenspiel - Trauermusik 10:05
7. Siegfried - Siegfried erschlagen 5:00
8. Starke Scheite schichtet mir dort 18:10

Astrid Varnay Brünnhilde
Ramon Vinay Siegfried
Lubomir Vichegonov (Luben Vichey) Hagen
Clifford Harvuot Gunther
Lucine Amara Gutrune
Herta Glaz/Rosalind Elias/Shakeh Vartenissian Die drei Rheintöchter

New York Philharmonic Orchestra
Dimitri Mitropoulos

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Wed Aug 07, 2019 4:44 pm

That was the performance of October 30, 1955. As far as I can tell, it's the only time Mitropoulos conducted this music, and for all the effort of preparing it, they gave only the one performance. The concert began with the Forest Murmurs from "Slegfried" and then on to "Götterdämmerung" after a brief pause. No chorus is credited in the program, though Act 3 of "Götterdämmerung" calls for it; is a chorus audible or did they just leave it out?

According to the program, New York mayor Robert Wagner proclaimed this "New York Philharmonic-Symphony" week, but while this has every appearance of being a gala, the program doesn't say so.
John Francis

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Aug 08, 2019 6:18 am

Yes to 30 Oct 1955. No to any chorus I can hear.

In a labor of love by a Symphonyshare member, this ASdisc rip of the transcription was painstakingly de-noised by hand, click by click and scratch by scratch, so as not to alter the underlying music. The sound is pretty good for that era.

Another member of that forum wrote:
"[Luben] Vichey [Hagen] had a long career at the Met, from a Sparafucile in RIGOLETTO in December 1948 to the Friar in DON CARLO in November 1965. I just missed hearing him when I started going to the Met in 1964-65."

Unsurprisingly, Mitropoulos' PSONY, esp. the brass, play beautifully; his conducting is, as usual, imaginative.

Image1955.10.30, Wagner by jserraglio, on Flickr

ImageASdisc 549 by jserraglio, on Flickr

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Aug 08, 2019 9:37 am

Gustave Bret: Fauré Requiem (rec. 1929-1930)

QTD material with slight revision and acknowledgement to the Symphonyshare forum member who did this restoration:

The first complete recording of the Fauré Requiem, a performance by the French conductor, composer, organist and critic Gustave Bret (1875-1969). He studied with Charles-Marie Widor and Vincent d'Indy, and was an organist at the Saint-Sulpice church in Paris. He was the first to perform all organ compositions by César Franck in 1903-1904. Bret composed an oratorio, Les Pélerins d'Emmaüs, the premiere of which took place in 1903 in Amsterdam.

Image

Choeur et Orchestre de la Société Bach
Gustave Bret, cond.

Louis Morturier (1888-1969): baritone
Fanny Malnory-Marseillac (1887-1979): soprano
The organist is Alexandre Cellier (1883-1968). He was organist of the Temple de l'Étoile in Paris from 1910 until his death. Cellier also composed organ music and chamber music.

78rpm 30 cm
Disque Gramophone W 1154-8
Recorded: 1929-1930

Image

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sat Aug 24, 2019 10:27 am

Albany Records “Toccata Project” cd , joy start to finish :

https://tinyurl.com/yyxf6n5j ( the cd at Amazon )

All here to hear :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J38TLYZ ... Nt7Kwdy7bR

Sample, Emma Lou Diemer’s “ Serenade Toccata “ :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds4fInjF-HU

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Aug 26, 2019 3:34 pm

Schoenberg's " Friede auf Erden " , Op.13 ( 1907),my first hearing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCrToyZfgs8

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 6:25 pm

Today :

Karen Walwyn's " Reflections on 9-11 ", for solo piano, the composer as pianist, Albany cd in my collection :

https://tinyurl.com/y4etzymd

George Lloyd's 3rd Piano Concerto,Kathryn Stott, pianist, the composer conducting BBC Phil, my Albany cd:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoIU8Yg3yAo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YytFSRZYUM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ya3WByMFW0

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Thu Sep 12, 2019 9:35 am

An interesting program, many new to me, really liked the Poulenc.

Concert du 6/10/2018 en différé du Kings Place à Londres avec Stephen Kovacevich et Margaret Fingerhut, pianos

Robert Schumann / Claude Debussy : Six Studies for Pedal Piano, op. 56
Arnold Bax : The Poisoned Fountain - Hardanger (Homage to Grieg), pour 2 pianos
Francis Poulenc : Élégie en accords alternés, pour 2 pianos - Capriccio (d'après Le bal masqué) - L'embarquement pour Cythère, for two pianos
Igor Stravinsky : Concerto pour 2 Pianos
Claude Debussy : En blanc et noir - Danse sacrée et Danse profane, L. 103
Serge Rachmaninov : Rhapsodie russe en mi mineur, pour 2 pianos (1891)

https://www.rtbf.be/auvio/detail_concer ... id=2540842

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:13 am

Interesting repertoire for Steven Bishop. I've booked seats for us tomorrow. :)

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sat Sep 14, 2019 11:17 am

Viktor Tretyakov ( Tchaikovsky Comp. winner 1966 ) plays the wonderful Prokofieff VC # 1 ( one of my fav VC’s ) with Gergiev live in Rotterdam in 1996 :

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/457- ... ry-gergiev

Cellist Edgar Moreau and pianist David Kadouch play Frank,Poulenc,Strohl live , the programme from their 2018 Erato cd :

https://www.rtbf.be/auvio/detail_concer ... id=2541658

Pianist-conductor Lahav Shani plays Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments with Gergiev live in Rotterdam Sept.12,2019, my first hearing of the pianist and work (great work ):

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/9245 ... van-parijs

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun Sep 15, 2019 6:26 pm

Local PBS TV today had the Mets 2018-19 “Adrianna Lecouvrere “ HD with Netrebko,Beczala,Noseda,wonderful “Abbe” , “Countess” whose names I missed. Wonderful.Sorry for spellings .

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sun Sep 15, 2019 10:02 pm

Adriana Lecouvreur......Anna Netrebko
Maurizio................Piotr Beczala
Princess di Bouillon....Anita Rachvelishvili
Michonnet...............Ambrogio Maestri
Bouillon................Maurizio Muraro
Abbé....................Carlo Bosi
Jouvenot................Sarah Joy Miller
Dangeville..............Samantha Hankey
Poisson.................Tony Stevenson
Quinault................Patrick Carfizzi
Major-domo..............Christian Rozakis
Chambermaid.............Anne Dyas
Duclos..................Snezhana Chernova
Pantalone...............Bill Corry

Conductor...............Gianandrea Noseda
Production..............David McVicar
Set Designer............Charles Edwards
Costume Designer........Brigitte Reiffenstuel
Lighting Designer.......Adam Silvermann
Choreographer...........Andrew George
Associate Director......Justin Way
TV Director.............Gary Halvorson

http://archives.metoperafamily.org/archives/frame.htm
John Francis

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Sep 16, 2019 12:13 pm


Thanks ! Rachvelishvili and Bosi were great, too , as were Netrebko and Beczala. I defer to others, however,as I am not knowledgeable although enjoy much opera music.

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Sep 16, 2019 12:14 pm

Some brief Debussy recordings by pianist George Copeland:

http://arbiterrecords.org/lifting-the-l ... ys-canope/

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:00 pm

Copeland became friends with Debussy who approved his way of playing his music. One of Copeland's most remarkable feats, repeated in several recordings, is his transcription of the Afternoon of a Faun, which you might think would lose a lot minus the colors of Debussy's orchestration. Well, judge for yourself:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76lLOqQmu7A
John Francis

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:31 pm

John F wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:00 pm
Well, judge for yourself:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76lLOqQmu7A
Thanks again for the YT. There is an extensive excerpt by Copeland about his time with Debussy at the Arbiter Records link I gave.

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Sep 16, 2019 5:20 pm

Listening today to Cantata BWV78 "Jesu, der du Meine Seele" from the All of Bach project in the Netherlands. Not only first class musicianship but notes accompany the work, similar to the old liner notes on CDs!!

https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-78/

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue Sep 17, 2019 2:01 pm

Piotr Anderszewski plays Beethoven’s Op.110 Piano Sonata at 2019 Schwetzingen Festival,starting at about 24:00 in to this BBCR3 broadcast. Very interesting and excellent throughout I thought.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0008hvn

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue Sep 17, 2019 7:53 pm

Ignace Tiegerman,Chopin Op.20 Scherzo,4th Ballade, Barcarolle,3rd Sonata,Arbiter Records 2-cd set in my collection.Mon Dieu ! :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TlVX8E ... tFzXyWQera

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Wed Sep 18, 2019 9:26 am

Belle wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 5:20 pm
Listening today to Cantata BWV78 "Jesu, der du Meine Seele" from the All of Bach project in the Netherlands. Not only first class musicianship but notes accompany the work, similar to the old liner notes on CDs!!

https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-78/
Belle, thank you for that exquisite Bach, especially for the soprano/countertenor (alto) duet, which was paced exactly right. The entire performance had a finesse and sensitivity that was world class! I would pay to have that DVD in my library! And what a fascinating website, with notes for each work, etc. Brilliant!

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:34 am

When I was a staff announcer for WBAI in New York, we signed off the air every night with this recording:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujLK28Nlmq4
John Francis

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Wed Sep 18, 2019 11:54 am

Yes, John, I had that on LP as well. Perfect tempo for the duet: haven't heard it in years. Thanks for posting! :D

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Wed Sep 18, 2019 2:15 pm

maestrob wrote:
Wed Sep 18, 2019 9:26 am
Belle wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 5:20 pm
Listening today to Cantata BWV78 "Jesu, der du Meine Seele" from the All of Bach project in the Netherlands. Not only first class musicianship but notes accompany the work, similar to the old liner notes on CDs!!

https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-78/
Belle, thank you for that exquisite Bach, especially for the soprano/countertenor (alto) duet, which was paced exactly right. The entire performance had a finesse and sensitivity that was world class! I would pay to have that DVD in my library! And what a fascinating website, with notes for each work, etc. Brilliant!
I head for the All of Bach site at least once a week and have donated to their project. At the moment things are a bit tight financially but as soon as we're free and clear I'll resume my donations to that and other institutions I regularly sponsor. It's about giving back and giving thanks and I'm only too happy to do it. In the case of the Netherlands Bach Society that is very much the case. (If I was buying these works on CD I'd be paying more than I currently donate year on year.)

Listening to the opening of that Cantata by Bach again this morning - the Chaconne - I instantly wondered if Bach knew the music of Purcell. It so reminded me of "When I am Laid in Earth". Bach, of course, was 10 years old when Purcell died. Does anybody have any knowledge of this?

(And what did we do as human beings to deserve the gift of Johann Sebastian Bach? Surely one of the greatest treasures of western civilization. And the gift that keeps on giving.)

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Wed Sep 18, 2019 4:20 pm

Belle wrote:the Chaconne - I instantly wondered if Bach knew the music of Purcell. It so reminded me of "When I am Laid in Earth".
Unlikely. That ground bass, known as the lamento or lament bass, was common property in the 17th century and after; Bach used it often. As for "Dido and Aeneas," the earliest known copy of the score dates from no earlier than the year of Bach's death, and as it wasn't published until much later, it's unlikely to have found its way to Leipzig by 1724 when cantata 78 was composed.
John Francis

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sat Sep 21, 2019 4:49 pm

Yuja Wang plays the Shostakovich PC # 1 and Martin Froest the Mozart CC at 2019 Tsinandali Festival :

https://www.medici.tv/en/concerts/yuja- ... beethoven/

I listen to the PC mainly to hear the great slow mov.

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun Sep 22, 2019 11:38 am

In addition to the Liszt " Harmonies" I had not heard, also Hungarian Bartok solo piano miniatures and sonata, Arcobaleno cd 1997,with pianist Diane Andersen, enjoy more now than on first hearings, 14 Bagatelles,Op.6 ( 1908 ), 4 Dirges, Op.8 (?),Improvisations,Op.20 (1920 ) , and Piano Sonata ( 1926 ). The earlier works bear and require repeated hearings.

The cd cheap at Amazon - US : https://tinyurl.com/y6h23ez9

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:33 am

Pletnev playing " Pictures" , not sure where, when, possibly Germany circa 2009-2011, quite something,especially left hand voicing in "Great Gate ". Video and audio:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMg_A8eYweY

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:05 am

I have not heard a lot of Judith Weir's music,have not much warmed to most that I have, but this UK premiere of her Oboe Concerto exhibits are very appealing,lyrical,elegiac work:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0008rbh ( At about 17:00 in )

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:35 am

Rach3 wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:33 am
Pletnev playing " Pictures" , not sure where, when, possibly Germany circa 2009-2011, quite something,especially left hand voicing in "Great Gate ". Video and audio:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMg_A8eYweY
I have the CD issued at that time, and I find Pletnev's approach highly individual, but never offensive. He should be heard. Thanks for posting this.

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:38 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:05 am
I have not heard a lot of Judith Weir's music,have not much warmed to most that I have
I've been intrigued by some of her operas, "A Night at the Chinese Opera" and "The Vanishing Bridegroom." Haven't heard much of her since then.
John Francis

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Sun Sep 29, 2019 5:21 pm

I watched this last night, Chrome Casting it to my television with its excellent sound system. I heard notes I'd never heard before in the Rachmaninov 3rd Concerto, though Horowitz was rather elastic with the tempi at times. See the way Mehta keeps a close eye on him all during the performance and seemed very relieved to get to the end of the musical journey in sync with Horowitz. How DOES Horowitz manage to bring the left hand to the fore without drowning out the right???

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5mxU_7BTRA

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:20 pm

Sheer magic. How else could 75-year-old flesh and bone do it? It wasn't just Mehta who was relieved to get to the end - I love it when Horowitz pumps the air at 41:42.
John Francis

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:07 pm

John F wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:20 pm
Sheer magic. How else could 75-year-old flesh and bone do it? It wasn't just Mehta who was relieved to get to the end - I love it when Horowitz pumps the air at 41:42.
I've just come from a morning tea spread put on by our parent organization (University of the Third Age) to thank those who do all the co-ordinating.

Sitting next to my friend, a PhD in Ethnomusicology, we had a long talk about music today - from jazz to art music of our time (particularly the Corigliano Clarinet Concerto - which he'd never heard before), music of the Medieval era and the role of the church. And also a discussion about great musicians such as Horowitz, which included jazz musicians.

Just a typical discussion amongst music enthusiasts on any social gathering!! What's not to love?

We are both in accord; we need to bring the music of our own time into our sessions with our group. Perhaps some people here can offer 'must have' recommendations for this?

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Sep 30, 2019 3:46 am

One possibility for your group might be John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1. It's an attested masterpiece of the 1980s (winner of the Grawemeyer Award), it's composed in a listenable style, it tells a story and it relates to a major issue of our time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_ ... origliano)

Corigliano's comments on the symphony as both personal and universal:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE5delIC0D4

There have been several recordings; here's one. It omits the epilogue which I've supplied from another recording.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KskXS9euKQY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQgo1sKGZYs

A review of a recent performance:

Review: The Searing Power of an AIDS Symphony
By Anthony Tommasini
May 31, 2019

During the late 1980s, as the AIDS epidemic became worse and worse with no end in sight, the composer John Corigliano did not shy away from responding to something so immense and horrific. When the Chicago Symphony Orchestra offered him a commission, he wrote a raw, seething symphony of rage and remembrance for friends who had died.

From its first performance, in 1990, Mr. Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1 brought catharsis and comfort to many listeners, and acclaim to its composer. It also stirred pushback from some critics who found the music too blatant: How many episodes of pummeling percussion, gnashing chords, screeching brass and sorrowfully wafting string melodies can one piece contain?

I used to share those reservations. But I hadn’t heard the work in a long while before Thursday, when Jaap van Zweden led the New York Philharmonic in a formidable performance at David Geffen Hall, part of the orchestra’s season-ending “Music of Conscience” series. Maybe some distance — the Philharmonic hadn’t performed it since 1992 — helped put the sincerity and intensity of the music, as well as Mr. Corigliano’s impressive technical skills, in perspective. I was engrossed.

The symphony fares best in live performance. On Thursday, the Philharmonic, with boosted ranks to accommodate a work scored for huge orchestral forces, held back nothing during din-like outbursts, yet also summoned shimmering sonorities during tender passages. The music seemed like an in-the-moment response to tragic loss.

The first movement, which reflects Mr. Corigliano’s anguish over the death of a pianist friend, begins with a nasal-twanged, persistent note that drives itself into your head, until slashing percussion and steely brass bludgeon it, if only for a moment. The movement then teeters between infuriated episodes and nostalgic passages, during which an offstage pianist plays bits of an Albéniz tango that Mr. Corigliano’s friend loved.

The second movement is based on a tarantella that Mr. Corigliano had written earlier for another friend, a record producer and amateur pianist. Here the dance keeps drifting into madness, where lilting rhythms turn frenzied and chords become distorted, as the music tries to depict AIDS dementia, often a last stage of the illness. During affecting stretches of the final movement, a forlorn melody is first played by a solo cello (here the superb Carter Brey) against streams of sound that become like undulant sonic waves — sometimes lulling, other times threatening.

The program began with a dark, majestic account of Brahms’s “Tragic” Overture. Then the thoughtful pianist David Fray was an elegant soloist in Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor. If Brahms and Mozart seem preoccupied with troubling thoughts in these two works, neither piece quite fit with the “Music of Conscience” theme. No matter. Mr. Corigliano’s symphony did the heavy lifting on this night.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/31/arts ... eview.html
John Francis

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:02 am

Thanks for this; noted and I'm listening. I am interested in the notion that the symphony works best in live performance. Yes, this is an issue for much contemporary music - as I've discovered myself in the concert hall (actually I think it applies to most music, to be honest, but it seems to make the unfamiliar somehow more accessible). Will listen carefully, make notes and send the links to my friend for discussion/comment. I could hear R. Strauss very early in those opening bars, after the tortured cry of the opening chord/s. Very exciting and my enthusiasm for doing this grows. Thank heavens I have a sympathetic colleague in our group.

My friend and I both agreed that if we are going to present this next year to a small 'c' conservative music group there should be no explanation or 'apologies' for what we're doing. Just present it and judge the responses from there and, above all, be able to answer questions!! One thing I'll have to investigate is how it follows the 'symphony' in terms of form. Maybe it is 'symphonic' in terms of orchestration and 'a way of listening/hearing' (as a very rough paraphrase of Rosen talking about sonata form). It is very definitely 'programmatic' and I love that haunting dance in the first movement.

It has certainly taken me a while to get to this point in my own musical journey but, as they say, better late than never!!

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:41 am

After Mahler and many 20th century symphonies, it's no longer very meaningful to talk of following the 'symphony' in terms of form. A symphony today is an orchestral composition of a certain undefined length and weight, sometimes divided into movements but often not, which the composer chooses to call a symphony. That said, Corigliano's first symphony has a rather traditional shape. It's in three continuous movements plus an epilogue; the first is the seat of greatest conflict, as with the Eroica; the second, Tarantella, is a grim scherzo; there follows a lyrical slow movement; and the epilogue contains reminiscences of themes from the earlier movements.

People can have very dogmatic notions of what a symphony is or ought to be. Years ago a member of CompuServe's Music Forum insisted that a symphony must have four movements, despite the existence of famous works in 5 or more movements (Beethoven No. 6), three (Mozart no. 38 and others), two (Nielsen No. 5), or just one (Sibelius No. 7), though one or more of these may actually te two movements merged nto one.

If there's a lesson to be learned from your branching out into contemporary music, it's not that the traditional forms have stayed the same but that they haven't. None of the movements in Mahler's 9th symphony is in classical sonata form (Wikipedia calls the first movement "loose" sonata form but that's stretching it), yet it is one of the greatest symphonies we have.
John Francis

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:57 am

I agree with what you've said about the symphony and its evolution; it appears freer and more organic for all the reasons you (and Rosen) suggested. Still, I will probably need to answer this question in more detail when the time comes.

Always interesting to read your ideas. Thanks. And I've remembered that I've raised this question of recommendations for contemporary music on another thread, which I'll have to search again for.

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Sep 30, 2019 6:46 am

Tom Service wrote:In 1907, Mahler met Jean Sibelius, whose symphonies are the polar opposite of Mahler's: compressed, distilled, self-referential. The composers discussed the meaning of the symphony. Sibelius admired its "profound logic and inner connection". Mahler completely disagreed: "A symphony must be like the world," he said. "It must embrace everything."
John Francis

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:17 am

Belle:

Do try the excellent John Adams CD pictured below led by Sir Simon (If you have amazon Prime you can stream it.) It's one of Rattles's best efforts; the disc simply explodes with energy. Harmonielehre may be Adams's greatest work to date, as he confessed to working really hard on it. Short Ride in a Fast Machine is a popular work here in the USA, with good reason. It's exciting and uplifting as well as new and accessible at the same time. Here's a picture of the CD:

Image

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:16 pm

John F wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 6:46 am
Tom Service wrote:In 1907, Mahler met Jean Sibelius, whose symphonies are the polar opposite of Mahler's: compressed, distilled, self-referential. The composers discussed the meaning of the symphony. Sibelius admired its "profound logic and inner connection". Mahler completely disagreed: "A symphony must be like the world," he said. "It must embrace everything."
Well that's very interesting. A discussion like this could provide one session alone in our music group - if I could come to grips with the complexities. I call all this a "gym for the brain"!

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:18 pm

maestrob wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:17 am
Belle:

Do try the excellent John Adams CD pictured below led by Sir Simon (If you have amazon Prime you can stream it.) It's one of Rattles's best efforts; the disc simply explodes with energy. Harmonielehre may be Adams's greatest work to date, as he confessed to working really hard on it. Short Ride in a Fast Machine is a popular work here in the USA, with good reason. It's exciting and uplifting as well as new and accessible at the same time. Here's a picture of the CD:

Image
Thanks. I heard Harmonielehre with the Berlin Philharmonic on the Digital Concert Hall when one member of our group presented a program last year on John Adams and his music!!

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Oct 02, 2019 6:26 pm

The complete piano Preludes of Heino Eller, my Pro Piano 1996 cd, Vardo Rumessen,piano.That cd is at YT now.

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:33 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Wed Oct 02, 2019 6:26 pm
The complete piano Preludes of Heino Eller, my Pro Piano 1996 cd, Vardo Rumessen,piano.That cd is at YT now.
I had a brief listen to these and also a link to an orchestral piece. Very interesting and worthy of further exploration. Have never heard of this composer.

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Oct 07, 2019 6:23 am

Beethoven Symphony #2, Chamber Orchestra of Europe/Harnoncourt; especially the 2nd movement Larghetto, which is calming in a storm-tossed world. Such a magnificent movement and, incredibly, written roughly contiguous with the despair of the Heiligenstadt Testament in 1802.

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Oct 07, 2019 1:11 pm

Wont appeal to all tastes, but I enjoy ( and have a recording of ) Henri Dutilleux’ Cello Concerto, “Tout un mode lointain…”, written for Rostropovich, here a perhaps rare (?) live performance by cellist Victor Julien-Laferriere with RCO under Gergiev , in Amsterdam Oct.3, 2019 :

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/9275 ... e-symfonie

From the cellist’s website :

“ 1st Prize winner of the Queen Elisabeth Competition 2017 in Brussels, as part of the first edition dedicated to cello, Victor Julien-Laferrière also won the 1st Prize and two special prizes at the 2012 Prague Spring International Competition. In 2018, he was awarded the Victoire de la Musique in France as “Best Instrumental Solo”….Victor Julien-Laferrière began the cello with René
Benedetti, then studied successively with Roland Pidoux at the Paris Conservatoire, Heinrich Schiff at the University of Vienna and Clemens Hagen at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. At the same time, he took part from 2005 to 2011 at Seiji Ozawa International Music Academy in Switzerland….He also receives many recording awards, including the Diapason d’or of the year 2017 for his sonata album with the pianist Adam Laloum. In January 2019, Victor Julien-Laferrière releases a new album devoted to Schubert with the Trio Les Esprits (Sony Music). His next release is planned for the Automn 2019 with the pianist Jonas Vitaud for the label Alpha Classics.”

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue Oct 08, 2019 6:19 pm

After some Kurtag's, and the latest horrors from Trump and his lemmings, cronies, solace in Mozart PC's Nos.11-13, K.413-415, Mozart's own versions for piano and string quartet , on my EMI Classics (now Warner Classics ) cd released 1998,recorded 1997,Patrick Dechorgnat,pianist,Henschel Quartet. The final movement of No.13 amazing, can stand with any mov. of any other PC Mozart wrote, IMHO.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJBSF2R ... 4B632zjp_s

Rach3
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 9:29 pm

Boris Lyatoshynsky, 1895-1968, piano music ( mine an OOP Russian CD ) .

Three Preludes, Op.38 :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zS-Y0oL ... Ez&index=9

Prelude,Op.44,# 2 :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnqJi4L ... z&index=10

Ballade, Op.22 :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUS3bjJ ... z&index=36

Fiorentino plays Brahms Variations,Piano Classics cd :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHFQYe0LUSg ( Handel )
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8EJ8QVO3Y4 (Paganini)

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